Handgun Radio 176 - The Sig Sauer P320 Saga & Other Handgun Recalls

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Hello and welcome to Handgun Radio! I’m your host Ryan Michad from the wild woods of Central Maine, and this is your home for all the news, information and discussion in the handgunning world.

 

This week we discuss the recent Sig P320 Saga and other handgun recalls!

 

Brought to you by the Firearms Radio Network

 

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Week in Review:  

Shooting a Ruger MKIV Tomorrow

Eddie Eagle Gun Safety: https://youtu.be/Ho36vonT3Rw

 

Robert:

I took 4 boys to the range Sunday. Shot up all my ammo.

Brett:

Bought a jogging stroller to turn into a 3 gun cart.

Drink Segment:  Fernet Michaud: http://liquidriot.com/packaged/fernet-michaud/

 

Main Topic: The Sig Sauer P320 Saga & Other Handgun Recalls

 

Sig Sauer safety alerts and recalls

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2017/08/11/was-the-p320-hammer-test-scientific/

 

Sig Sauer P320 Pistol

 

Remington

R51 – too easy not to talk about this one

https://www.remington.com/news/2014/remington-arms-announces-voluntary-product-recall

 

S&W Shield

https://secure05.lwcdirect.com/front/frontQuestionnaire.jsp?linkparam=y&uID=0&p=mpshieldsafetyalert.com&loginType=skipWelcome&clientID=742&campaignID=63

Ruger MK IV

https://ruger.com/dataProcess/markIVRecall/index.php

 

Glock

https://us.glock.com/customer-service/recoil-spring-exchange

 

Interesting link of recalls and warning at FirearmsID.com

http://firearmsid.com/recalls/Firearm%20Recall%20Index.htm

 

Additonal recall links ( I did not research each case just the link )

Whitney Wolverine

http://rockislandauction.blogspot.com/2014/05/rise-and-fall-of-whitney-wolverine.html

Taurus

Taurus safety alerts and recalls

Curve

PT Series Pistols

https://bearingarms.com/bob-o/2015/07/28/massive-taurus-safety-settlement-include-100000-pistols/

 

Walther CCP

Walther safety alerts and recalls

Walther CCP Pistol

Walther PK380

Walther PPK and PPK/S pistols

http://www.waltherarms.com/ccp-recall-notice/#

 

Caracal

https://caracalusa.com/press/cat/recall

 

Vector South Africa

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vektor_CP1

 

Ruger

 

LCP

http://www.ruger.com/LCPRecall/

SR9

http://www.ruger.com/SR9Recall/index.html

 

S&W

22a

https://www.smith-wesson.com/safety/recalls/model-22a-pistols-safety-recall

329

https://www.smith-wesson.com/safety/recalls/performance-center-model-329-safety-recall

460

https://www.smith-wesson.com/safety/recalls/performance-center-model-460-safety-recall

 

Beretta

http://www.berettasupport.com/

 

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2010/09/16/recall-notice-beretta-neos-pistols/

 

IWI recall

Galil ACE pistols

Springfield Armory

XDS

http://www.springfieldrecall.com/recall%20faq.asp



 

Wrap-Up:

  • Don’t forget to shop Brownells using our affiliate link! Head to firearmsradio.tv and click the affiliate link in the upper right hand corner!

  • Be sure to go like Handgun Radio on facebook and share it with your friends!

  • Leave us a review on iTunes!

  • Listen to all the great shows on the Firearms Radio Network!Guns of Hollywood

  • Be sure to visit the Firearms Insider for review more awesome content! Also, if you are interested in writing reviews for the Firearms Insider, please email TJ at tj@firearmsradio.tv

  • Be sure to check out the Firearms Radio Network on YouTube!

  • Visit Weerd Beard at  weerdworld.com   sqrpt.com  http://gunblogvarietycast.com/

 

Until next week, have fun and SAFE SHOOTING!!!!

 

Handgun Radio 152 - Polymer Pistol Modifications

Hello and welcome to Handgun Radio! I’m your host Ryan Michad  from the wild woods of Central Maine, and this is your home for all the news, information and discussion in the handgunning world.

This week, Weerd & I discuss modifications you might consider making to your polymer pistol!

Brought to you by the Firearms Radio Network

Please check out the Patriot Patch Company for their awesome patches and other high quality items! Visit www.patriotpatch.co for more information!

Shop Amazon using our affiliate link www.firearmsradio.tv/amazon

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Week in Review:

Ryan: Ruger Mk III Discontinued!!!

-The SPAs Argentinas Full Auto

Ruger SR1911 Target

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2016/11/29/ruger-sr1911-target/

Drink Segment: Bar Equipment:   Jigger:  You can get a set of double jiggers, which is really classy looking,  but I get a LOT more versatility out of a graduated jigger.

Shaker:  Traditionally we use a Boston Shaker which is the pint glass with a metal cup.   I prefer a Cobbler shaker, which is a metal cup with a cap and attached strainer.

Strainer: If you use the boston shaker, or use a mixing glass for stirred drinks, you’ll need a strainer.   A Hawthorn Strainer is the metal spring that is most common,  but a Julep strainer which is just an oversized metal spoon will win you some style points.

Bar Spoon: Something I don’t have, but they’re really handy.   Of course you use them to stir your drink,  but you can also measure ingredients and even muddle with them.

Main Topic: Modifiying Your Polymer Pistol

http://www.cylinder-slide.com/index.php?app=ccp0&ns=prodshow&ref=915

https://robarguns.com/custom-weapons/handguns/kahr/

https://robarguns.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/1911-two-tone-roguard-and-NP3.jpg

https://robarguns.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Poly-T2.png

Boresight Solutions Facebook

http://www.boresightsolutions.com/

 

Stippling

Trigger Modifications

Magwells

Slide Modifications

Wrap-Up:

  • Don’t forget to shop Brownells using our affiliate link! Head to firearmsradio.tv and click the affiliate link in the upper right hand corner!

  • Be sure to go like Handgun Radio on facebook and share it with your friends!

  • Leave us a review on iTunes!

  • Listen to all the great shows on the Firearms Radio Network!Guns of Hollywood

  • Be sure to visit the Firearms Insider for review more awesome content! Also, if you are interested in writing reviews for the Firearms Insider, please email TJ at tj@firearmsradio.tv

  • Be sure to check out the Firearms Radio Network on YouTube!

  • Visit Weerd Beard at  weerdworld.com   sqrpt.com  http://gunblogvarietycast.com/


Until next week, have fun & safe shooting!!!

 

 

HGR 072 - Kahr Talk

Hello and welcome to Handgun Radio! I’m your host Ryan Michad from the wilds of Central Maine, and this is your home for all the news, information and discussion in the handgunning world.

This week, I’m joined by TJ and Weerd Beard to discuss the Kahr brand of handguns and my new 9mm single-stack!

Brought to you by the Firearms Radio Network

Week in Review:

Ryan - Did some reloading for my new gun, got 50 rounds of 9mm 115 grain ball loaded up and got to test them today. They functioned perfectly although one magazine the slide didn’t lock back so I think I may have bumped it with my thumb.

  • Got a Sticky Holster in for test and evaluation. Look for a review coming up soon on the Firearms Insider!

TJ:

Weerd:  http://www.weerdworld.com/2014/a-little-gun-geekery/

Main Topic: Kahr Talk

As I have mentioned before on the show, I was looking for something that was much lighter and suited to comfortable pocket carry. I was looking for a 9mm, and a single stack. At first I considered guns like the S&W Shield or the LC9s but those all had features that I didn’t care for. The LC9s has too many “safety” devices and the Shield just seemed too big for comfortable pocket carry. I had thought about the XDs but that has too many safety devices as well. Then TJ and Chad mentioned the Kahr pistols to me. I remembered shooting one a long time ago and I really liked the long smooth revolverish trigger pull. I started searching for a CM9 but had no luck around here. They were all running too high for my budget. I had resigned myself to just getting a Ruger LCP with a grip extension and being done with it, but then I decided to check one of the local swap and sell websites. There was a Kahr CM9 9mm with TWO magazines and the original box and papers. The price was well below what everyone else wanted for them. I asked the seller why he didn’t want it and why he didn’t shoot it and he responded with “I have no use for a 9mm, we shoot 10mm and .45 around here” (which was an awesome response, by the way). The gun was in its original factory condition and visual inspection didn’t show any evidence that it had been fired beyond the test-firing at the factory.

So far, I have put about 50 rounds through the Kahr and I couldn’t be happier with it! The gun fits my hand well, it has a fantastic trigger pull that is smooth without alot of takeup. It just has a nice consistent firm resistance all the way through the stroke. The gun has not hung up, even on my handloads and has functioned reliably so far. The sights are really good and the gun carries well in the pocket without snagging on the draw. I highly recommend the Kahr CM9, especially if you are a longtime revolver shooter like me; the trigger will be just like an old friend.

A great review of the CM9 from Chad W. over at the Firearms Insider!

TJ couldn’t make it this evening, but he did send me a message to let us know his experience with his Kahr .380.

I sold my LCP because I wanted something with better sights and a better trigger. The Kahr seemed to fit that role, so I went with it. When I picked it up from that dealer, I immediately realized how stiff the slide was. I actually cut my finger trying to lock it open, but I knew that Kahr recommended a break in period, so I wasn't worried. The slide weight actually loosened up just from handling it for a few days. The first range trip, I had a couple of failures to feed and failures to extract during the first 60 rounds. When I shot it this past weekend, it functioned perfectly for about 150 rounds. The only issues I had were 2 stovepipes and the slide not locking open on an empty mag. The stovepipes I attributed to the 2 new 7 round mags, because it only happened the first time I shot each mag, so I feel confident with that. I ended up fixing the slide lock issue by holding a locked thumb grip, verses my usual thumbs forward grip. I was very impressed with the accuracy as J was able to keep most of the rounds on an 11x17 silhouette at ~15 paces. In the end, I love my Kahr and would recommend one to anyone. Just remember the break in, and it'll be great.

Weerd Beard, you have many, MANY Kahr stories. What has been your experience with Kahrs?

What features that are on Kahrs make them different from other polymer pistols?

What would you like to see Kahr come out with in the future?

Obscure Gun of the Week:

(Ruger must have heard us talk about the LCR style in the long barrel a few episodes back)

Ryan: Small North American Arms revolver in .32 S&W (with a corresponding company offering to load .32 S&W), either top break or swing out. Would be great quality and a fun gun.

Weerd: X Frame in .22 LR (22 SHOTS!!!)

Wrap-Up:

HGR 044 - Handguns of World War I & II

This week, myself and Weerd Beard of the Squirrel Report discuss the various handguns that were used in World War I & II. We also discuss some blackpowder revolver testing I did this weekend!

Brought to you by the Firearms Radio Network

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Week in Review:

Ryan:

  • Shot the Pietta this weekend, got some pretty decent groups with it! There is a video over at the YouTube page showing the test. I used a pistol rest and shot three, five shot groups from 25 and 15 yards. The first group was okay, the second group was one of my best, and the third one was abysmal. The blackpowder revolvers seem to be sensitive to the powder charge, and that seems to have a large effect of the accuracy that you can obtain. The single action trigger is wonderful for precise shooting, but the sights are miniscule to almost non-existent. I also used some paper cartridges that I made. These were more for convienience than anything, as the charge was already pre measured, and all I had to do was dump it in the chamber and seat the ball after. A great day of shooting and a good time!

Weerd: Time with family; watching videos!

Main Topic: Handguns of World War I & II

So this week, we are going to be discussing the military handguns that were issued to each side during World War I & II. I chose to lump both conflicts together for the purposes of this episode because many of the countries did not change their selected handgun between the two conflicts. Other countries SLIGHTLY changed their guns, like the British and the .455 vs. .380/200. One thing to note also is going to be the differences in purpose that the handgun served between the European countries and the United States. In most of the European countries, with Great Britain being the exception, the handgun was seen as a badge of rank, not as a serious front-line combat weapon. This is the reason that you see many of the European service sidearms chambered for cartridges that we would consider not combat effective. A good example of this is the Walther PPK in .32 ACP or the Beretta 1934 in .380 Auto. For the purposes of our discussion, we are going to stick with the larger players in the conflict and stay away from the smaller countries that may have had their own domestic arms production and had an individual pistol of their own. Also, a few countries, ESPECIALLY Germany, would seize arms from a country they invaded and absorb those arms into their ranks, oftentimes giving them a designation under the “substitute standard” category. One great example of this is the Browning Hi-Power, which, when issued in German service, was designated the Pistole 640 (b). Also, different branches of the military may have used different firearms as well. While the standard pistol for the German military at the start of WWII was the P08 Luger, the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) and the Fallschirmjagers (Paratroopers) were known to use the Astra 600 and the Sauer 38H respectively. We are going to try to stick with the MAIN handguns that were issued on both sides.

World War I & II:

Allied Forces:

Great Britain:

- At the end of World War I, only three major military powers still issued revolvers as their standard handgun; France, Great Britain and the new-to-the-party USSR.

- The British forces in World War I (and many in World War II) carried the Webley Mark IV revolver chambered in .455 Webley. The .455 Webley was a decent combat cartridge, firing a 265 grain .45 caliber slug at 650 to 700 feet per second. The Webley Mark IV was a double-action, break open revolver with automatic ejection that weighed in at a hefty two pounds, five ounces.

- In order to lessen the weight on the footsoldier, the British switched in 1928 to the Enfield No.2 Mark I revolver. This revolver was smaller and lighter than the Webley, and was modified to speed up production and cut manufacturing costs. It chambered a cartridge that was known as the .380/200. It was basically a beefed up .38 S&W cartridge, moving a 178 grain bullet at 700 feet per second. Weighing in at only 27 ounces, it was a full ten ounces lighter than the Webley Mark IV. It used the same break action automatic ejection that the Webley Mark IV used.

- Not wanting to be outdone on the semi-automatic pistol front, the British helped get some designers out of occupied Belgium and send them to work at the Inglis factory in Canada. These designers, including one Dieudonne Saive, brought with them the blueprints for the Browning Hi-Power and built them for the Allied Forces use. The British began issuing the 13 shot 9mm pistol to troops in March 1945, just in time for the last operations of the war. The Hi-Power has the distinction of being used by both sides in the conflict, with the Germans utilizing Hi-Powers mostly with the Waffen SS and the Fallschirmjager forces.

_Webley also did some limited use with the .455 Webley Self-loading Pistol which was chambered in the .455 Webley Automatic which fired a 224 grain jacketed bullet at 700 FPS.

France:

- France was armed with a HUGE array of different handguns following World War I. The main handgun that was issued to French soldiers during WWI was the G. The M1892 revolver fired an 8mm French cartridge and weighed in at around 30 oz. It was a double-action revolver, with a swing-out cylinder holding six rounds. The French attempted to switch to a domestically-designed and produced semi-auto, the Mle 1935, but production could not keep up with the needs of the troops, and continued to issue revolvers. The 8mm French cartridge fired a 128 grain bullet at 730 feet per second, not very robust. One notable feature of the revolver was that the cylinder swung out to the right instead of the typical left. Many believe this was to allow cavalry to reload the gun with the reins in their hand and not having to swtich hands. After France was occupied by the Germans, the resistance fighters continued to use the Mle 1892 in large numbers.

- In WWI, the French were desperate for small arms, particularly handguns which were well suited for trench warfare. Several Spanish firms had begun manufacturing handguns that almost replicated the venerable Colt/Browning 1903 Pocket Hammerless, but with a longer grip to accommodate more cartridges. The French government got ahold of some of these so-called “Ruby” pistols in 1915, and contracted with several Spanish firms to produce the small .32 ACP pistols for their troops. The name “Ruby” covers the general form/finish/caliber/function of the pistols rather than being a particular brand or model.

USSR (Russia):

- The USSR followed a similar pattern of the British army, sticking with a revolver for the majority of both conflicts, before switching to a semi-automatic pistol. The USSR switched much earlier than the British Army, but still used revolvers right until the end of the war and beyond.

- The USSR issued the much-loved (not) Nagant 1895 Revolver. The Nagant used a 7.62 cartridge that was seated well below the case mouth, like a deep seated wadcutter. This bullet helped create a gas seal along with the unique mechanism of the gun, where the cylinder cams forward on every shot. The 1895 Nagant 7.62 cartridge launched a 102 grain bullet at 900 fps, which was very underpowered compared to other pistol cartridges of the time. The Nagant has the distinction of being the only revolver that can be effectively suppressed due to its gas seal operation. The NKVD put this to good use in the 1950’s.

- The USSR did adopt a semi-automatic handgun in 1930, the TT series of pistols. The TT-30 and more ubiquitous TT-33 were semi-automatic pistols that took cues from the M1911 pistol and the 1903 Pocket Hammerless pistol. It used a simplified trigger system that could actually be removed from the gun as a unit for repair or replacement. The TT-33 was probably most notable for its powerful cartridge. A HUGE step up from the 1895 Nagant cartridge, the 7.62x25mm launched an 85 grain bullet at almost 1,500 fps! This cartridge was based off the 7.63x25mm Mauser cartridge that was chambered in the C96 “Broomhandle” pistols. The TT-33 did not fully replace the Nagant Revolver, but it did significantly increase the firepower of the troops.

United States:

-  The United States saw the handgun as a viable combat weapon, unlike many other countries in WWI & II. The U.S. issued the well-known M1911 pistol in .45 ACP from 1911 all the way to 1986. The 1911 has been covered as much as any one handgun can be covered, but it served well in the military. It fired a hard-hitting & proven cartridge and was accurate and controllable.

- While the U.S. had the 1911, they still had a need for even more handguns. S&W had contracted with the U.S. to provide revolvers, and a S&W engineer came up with the design for moon-clips, allowing the rimless .45 ACP to be fired out of a revolver. The S&W Model 1917 and the similar Colt 1917 served as substitute standard weapons in both wars. The 1917 revolver saw a great deal of use in the Pacific theater during WWII.

Axis Powers:

Germany:

Luger P08: Introduced 1904,  Chambered firs in the 7.65x21mm (AKA .30 Luger) but later chambered for the famous 9x19mm Luger.   Used a toggle lock system and was striker fired.   It used a lot of hand fitting had had almost no parts interchangeability between units without fitting.

Walther P38/ P1:   Chambered also in 9x19 luger.   Uses the Walther locking block design that is best seen today in the Beretta 92/M9.   It was DA/SA gun using a slide mounted decocking and safety lever.   In many ways this gun can be considered a single-stack predecessor to the Beretta 92 series.  In 1961 this gun was updated with an aluminum alloy frame and called the P1 which was still being issued until 2004 when it was fully replaced by the H&K USP pistol which had started seeing service in the 1990s.

Walther PP and PPK: The PP (Police Pistol in German) was the first gun to be issued, chambered in .32 Auto and .380 Auto.   PPK (Police Pistol Short *kurtz*) was a smaller variant.

It was one of the first DA/SA pistols issued, and was simple blowback with the decocking and safety lever on the slide.   More of a badge than a fighting weapon, given how small even the PP variant was, and the power level of the .32 and .380 pistol cartridges.

Italy:

-Beretta Model 1934 .380 ACP

-Glisenti Model 1910

Japan:

-Type 14 Nambu (8mm)

-Type 94 (8mm)

Wrap-Up:

HGR 041 - Paul Carlson of Safety Solutions Academy & The Remington R-51

This week, myself and special guest Paul Carlson, the proprietor of the Safety Solutions Academy, discuss his work in the defensive training world as well as his experiences with the new-for-2014 Remington R-51.

Brought to you by the Firearms Radio Network

Brownells helps make Handgun Radio possible. Selection, service, satisfaction. Find it all at Brownells! If you are doing any shopping with Brownells please use our affiliate link www.handgunradio.com/brownells to help support the show!

Week in Review:

paul carlson
paul carlson

Ryan:

  • Getting stuff ready for next week’s test of the Glock 42 and the XDs 4.0! Hope to get some great footage of these handguns!
  • My dad found a bunch of old holsters from his early patrol days, as well as the original wooden target grips for the S&W Model 19. I can’t wait to get those on there and see how it looked in it’s original format!

Main Topic: Safety Solutions Academy with Paul Carlson & the Remington R-51 Saga

Safety Solutions Academy:

  • What prompted you to start Safety Solutions Academy?
  • I notice you train people in many different disciplines, such as Unarmed Defensive Training, Long Guns, and have done trainings such as Mas Ayoob’s MAG-20/40 training. Do you have a particular formula that leads you to offer a wide variety such as this? Some way that you balance “knowledge” education with practical education i.e. range time?
  • In your experience, what are some of the more common training “mistakes” made by people who may be new to the training world?
  • With the great increase in firearms sales over the past several years, we have seen a corresponding increase in people offering training services. Many of these people are reputable, knowledgeable individuals such as you & your business, but many are not. For those people that are looking to spend some money and get some training, what are some things to note when looking for a good instructor/training company?
  • What do you have planned in the future for SSA?
  • What are some firearms you are really excited about for 2014?

The Remington R-51 Saga:

As many listeners know, I was extremely excited about the R51, because I am a huge fan of the Colt 1903 and it was nice to see a design from the period being brought back to life. Unfortunately, the R-51 seems to be experiencing quite a few problems. Paul has some videos over at the SSA YouTube page that you can check out!

  • First off, with a hands-on view of the gun like you have (I have not handled one yet) is it living up to much of the hype regarding its controllability and other “advantages”?
  • What are some of the issues that MOST concern you about the pistol? (Maybe from most concerning to least concerning?)
  • Do you have any thoughts as to what might be causing some of the issues you’ve experienced?
  • I really want this gun to work. It is really awesome when a company chooses to resurrect a classic design and they get it right. This is not the case with the R51 it seems. Do you have any thoughts on changes they could make to increase functionality?
  • If you could have the ultimate single-stack 9mm, what would your specifications be for the Paul Carlson 9mm?
  • What classic design would you like to see a modern company reintroduce? (my vote is the Colt 1903.)

Wrap-Up: