Reloading Podcast 271 - bolt vs semi revisited

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking a bit more about bolt vs semi.

  1. What is the name of Phil’s podcast?

  2. Hi guys,To your discussion the other day on accuracy of an AR15 vs a bolt gun. Never heard of a bench rest shooter using an AR15. I have an experiment for you all. Does the COL change when the bolt slams shut? This is the same way a bullet puller works. And if no crimp is applied will the “feed ramp” move the bullet? I hade a 6.8 spec bullet pushed back in the case. It was un crimped reduced load. I believe on a normal load (100% density) the powder would keep this from a curing. I will never load for an auto loader and not crimp. Thanks and keep up the good work. Jr.

    1. Case mouth and Neck Tension gage

    2. Primer pocket go no go

  3. I’m a new listener and I’m really enjoying your podcast. I started listening about a month or so ago. I started on episode 232 and have been playing catch-up and I’m now up to episode 251. At the end of episode 243 you were talking about where everyone was from. I believe it was Jim (I don’t know everyone’s name by voice yet) who said he was from Pennsylvania and moved to North Carolina. I just recently moved to Northern Virginia from Oregon and I’m having a hard time finding a good reloading shop. I don’t know if he is familiar with or knows any good shops being from the area. Any and all suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks for your time and Keep up the good work! Palm

  4. Hello everyone and just wanted to say I’m new to the podcast, but so far you guys are doing a great job! Very useful information and great topics. I have always casted bullet then used liquid alox, but after hearing Travis give the used car lot salesmen’s speech of powder coat, I’d figure why not give it a go, so my question is when would Jim make the amazing transition from alox to powder coat? I did and I wondered why I have not started powder coating sooner! Thanks guys and keep up the good work! - Lupe from California






Cartridge corner:Cartridge corner:The 7.65×53mm Mauser (designated as the 7,65 × 53 Arg. by the C.I.P.)[2] is a first-generation smokeless powder rimless bottlenecked rifle cartridge developed for use in the Mauser Model 1889 rifle by Paul Mauser of the Mauser company. It is also known as 7.65×53mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Argentine rimless, 7.65mm Argentine, 7.65×53mm Belgian Mauser or 7.65mm Belgian (in the United States) and 7.65×53mm Mauser (in Belgium).

The 7.65×53mmR is a rimmed variant of the 7.65×53mm Mauser cartridge.[citation needed] Ballistically it is comparable to the also-rimmed .303 British cartridge.[citation needed]

Contents

History[edit]

The 7.65×53mm Mauser was the result of considerable experimentation by Paul Mauser to optimize the bullet diameter for use with the new smokeless propellant introduced as Poudre B in the 1886 pattern 8mm Lebel that started a military rifle ammunition revolution.[3] At the time of its development it was a high-performance smokeless-powder cartridge.

This cartridge was loaded commercially by many manufacturers in the United States until about 1936.[1] Hornady is the only major U.S. ammunition manufacturer to still produce this cartridge. Sporting ammunition in this caliber is still loaded in Europe.[1] Norma, Prvi Partizan, and Fabricaciones Militares (FM) currently produce 7.65×53mm ammunition.[4] Boxer-primed cases are easily formed from .30-06 brass; resize and trim. For reloading the cartridge, use .303" British load data.

Cartridge dimensions[edit]

The 7.65×53mm Mauser has 3.70 ml (57.1 grains H2O) cartridge case capacity. The exterior shape of the case was designed to promote reliable case feeding and extraction in bolt action rifles and machine guns alike, under extreme conditions.

7.65×53mm Mauser maximum C.I.P. cartridge dimensions. All sizes in millimeters (mm).

Americans would define the shoulder angle at alpha/2 ≈ 22.2 degrees. The common rifling twist rate for this cartridge is 280 mm (1 in 11.02 in), 4 grooves, Ø lands = 7.65 mm, Ø grooves = 7.92 mm, land width = 4.20 mm and the primer type is large rifle.[2]

According to the official Commission Internationale Permanente pour l'Epreuve des Armes à Feu Portatives (CIP) rulings the 7.65×53mm Mauser can handle up to 390.00 MPa (56,565 psi) Pmax piezo pressure. In CIP member countries every rifle cartridge combination has to be proofed at 125% of this maximum pressure to certify fit for sale to consumers. This means that 7.65×53mm Mauser chambered arms in CIP regulated countries are currently (2013) proof tested at 487.50 MPa (70,706 psi) PE piezo pressure.[2]

The American .308 Winchester cartridge is a close ballistic twin of the 7.65×53mm Mauser. The .308 Winchester being a post World War II cartridge developed by Winchester to provide similar performance in a short bolt action format.[citation needed]

Due to the cartridge case's dimensions, production of 7.65mm brass can be accomplished by reforming .30-06 Springfield cases. Simply resize and trim.

Military ammunition[edit]

Round-nosed 7.65×53mm Mauser ball ammunition

Spitzer 7.65×53mm Mauser ball ammunition

The original 1898 pattern military ball ammunition was introduced in the Mauser Model 1889 and loaded with a 13.65 grams (210.7 gr) round-nosed bullet fired at a muzzle velocity of 650 m/s (2,133 ft/s) with 2,884 J (2,127 ft⋅lbf) muzzle energy.

Following the lead of French and German army commands in developing the spitzer - a pointed-tip - bullet shape, later military ball ammunition was loaded with a 10.00 g (154.3 gr) spitzer bullet fired at a muzzle velocity of 830 m/s (2,723 ft/s) with 3,445 J (2,541 ft⋅lbf) muzzle energy from a 589 mm (23.2 in) long barrel became available. It had a maximum range of 3,700 m (4,046 yd).[5] Reverse engineering the trajectory from the previous sentence indicates a ballistic coefficient (G1 BC) of approximately 0.34.

After that military ball ammunition loaded with an 11.25 g (173.6 gr) spitzer bullet fired at a muzzle velocity of 725 m/s (2,379 ft/s) with 2,957 J (2,181 ft⋅lbf) muzzle energy from a 589 mm (23.2 in) long barrel became available. Besides a pointed nose this projectile also had a boat tail to further reduce drag. It had a maximum range of 5,000 m (5,468 yd).[5] Reverse engineering the trajectory from the previous sentence indicates a ballistic coefficient (G1 BC) of approximately 0.55.

Military use[edit]

At one time, the 7.65×53mm Mauser cartridge saw widespread military use. It was used by:

Chambered service weapons[edit]

Some of the Mauser rifles it was used in were the Model 1889, Model 1890, Model 1891, Model 1893, Model 1903, Model 1905, Model 1907, Model 1909, Model 1927, FN Model 1930, Vz. 32, Standardmodell 1933 and FN Model 1935. Other rifles included the Fittipaldi machine gun, Madsen machine gun and the FN Model 1949. In Argentinian military service, the cartridge was used from 1891 to the early 1970s in Mauser bolt-action military rifles, as well as a semi-automatic rifle, the FN-49, manufactured by Fabrique Nationale in Belgium.

References[edit]

  • Ball, Robert W. D. (2011). Mauser Military Rifles of the World. Iola: Gun Digest Books. ISBN 9781440228926.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 7,65×53 mm Argentino.

 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 270 - Sharenda Birts

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking with Sharenda Birts.

  1.  Sharenda Birts:  Personal History of Reloading.  

  2. Ben Paulson posted in RLPGFB: I have an older Lyman 500 beam scale. Never had a problem zeroing it or verifying with the weights. I have one of the Lyman weight sets as well. Went to check it today before starting and every weight confirmed zero correctly except the 5 grain test piece and the 4 grain (2 of the 2 grains pieces). I cleaned all the weight pieces just Incase but still same results. The beam scale is about 20+ years old. Do I need a new scale?

  3. Travis Cress posted in RLPGFB: First time playing with compressed loads on a ladder load. Started at 90percent at coal of 2.170 by the time I got to my 95 percent capacity was seating at 2.175. Should I have adjusted the seating stem for the extra volume? Or should it all be ok seeing it’s only .005 in length ?






Cartridge corner: 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 269 - Lil Gun and cornmeal

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are covering some more questions.

  1. Charlie Foxtrot posted in RLPGMW::  What is the difference between the Dillon 650 and the new 750? Is the difference significant? Can a Dillon 650 be upgraded to a 750?

  2. Russ Harrison posted in RLPGMW: I hate being a pain in the arse, but wanting to try many different powders and bullets for my load development. I am already using H110 and Longshot with bullets ranging from 325 - 410 grain. I picked up a pound of Lil’ Gun at the local gun shop and a patron reminded me of it’s reputation for forcing cone erosion. Checked The Reloading Room and found a variety of opinions. New revolver so all modern metals in its construction. Is the erosion caused by fast or slow burning powders, single or double based propellants, heavy or light bullets, or am I just looking for a boogie man? I know Jason shoots a lot of big bore revolvers, but would appreciate all of your opinions Sorry for being so long winded

  3. Paul Nelson posted last week in RLPGFB: This question is for Jim Fleming; When you formed your 7mm AI brass why did you use the cornmeal vs just shoot a bullet down the barrel? By shooting a bullet you could form the brass, break in the barrel at the same time. I reloaded a few wildcats in my day and except where the shoulder was moved forward and the neck reduced I loaded up a bullet in a near normal load and fired it. Examples .223 AI I just shot standard of 223 loads, same with 22-250 AI along with 6mm Remington AI. Other wildcats like 30 and 357 Herrett have a rim but I still used a handloader to expand out the case. Cases like the 6 mm bench rest I needed to do the cornmeal and wad to format cases do to case neck thinking when forming cases from 243 Winchester once Remington stopped producing bench rest brass that was pre thinned in production.





Cartridge corner: 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser

History


During the muzzle loading era, the most common bore diameters in Europe ranged between 17 and 18mm. With the development of the brass case cartridge and breech loading rifle, ballisticians also began experimenting with smaller bores. The 15mm bore diameter appeared during the 1850’s and by the 1870's, 10 and 11mm cartridges were very much in vogue. The next major discovery was smokeless powder, this new powder created higher velocities, which in turn gave rise to the possibility of using even smaller bores. 


In 1886 Colonel Nicholas Lebel of France created the first smokeless small bore cartridge, the 8mm Lebel.  At this time, France was under the influence of a power hungry war monger, General Boulanger. The advantages of the Lebel cartridge in the hands of the French immediately struck terror throughout the rest of Europe. Some countries panicked and attempted to rework their existing weapons. Paul Mauser of Germany took a longer view and in 1888 produced the 7.92 (8x57). It was the first smokeless rimless cartridge and its design was so well thought out that it went on to become the parent of our most popular modern cartridges. Nevertheless, both Mauser and other industrious groups continued to experiment with various bore diameters, the most cutting edge developments produced by Swiss researchers. 

 

The Italian military had acted very rashly in the face of Lebel’s invention and had lost a lot of money trying to upgrade existing arms. It was the decision to start afresh using the latest available technology that led the Italians to Professor Freidrich Hebler of Switzerland. Hebler had been experimenting with 6mm and 6.5mm caliber bores. The Italians were impressed and decided to adopt a 6.5mm caliber cartridge. The Italian military then began looking for parties interested in designing a suitable rifle for the new caliber. 45 'contestants' entered the competition and of these, two contractors Paul Mauser and Ferdinand Ritter Von Mannlicher, were supplied with prototype cartridges and barrels. Only Mannlicher succeeded in a limited capacity with his magazine design, the Italians used this design while Italian Lt Col Salvatore Carcano was responsible for designing the rifle. The pyrotechnic laboratory of Bologna redesigned Hebler’s prototype 6.5mm rimmed cartridge based on a rimless case. In 1891 the Modella 91 Carcano rifle chambered in 6.5x52 was born. Many of these rifles have survived to the present day and are often referred to as Mannlicher Carcano's. The original military load featured a 162 grain bullet at 2300fps ( 30" barrel ). 


The next Countries to adopt the 6.5mm bore diameter were Norway and Sweden. The 6.5x55 cartridge was initially designed during a joint Norwegian-Swedish commission. Norway officially adopted the 6.5x55 in 1894. But for whatever reasons, history seems to have forgotten Norwegian involvement as well as the 6.5x55 Krag even though over a quarter of a million rifles were produced in Norway. Furthermore, to the dismay of modern Norwegian hunters and historians, the 6.5x55 is today known as the 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser.


Sweden looked to Paul Mauser for a rifle design to house the 6.5x55. Mauser's newest rifle, the M93 (1893) chambered in 7x57 had just been sold in great numbers to the Spanish military. This rifle was a culmination of Paul Mauser's 22 years as a rifle designer and all of it's features were of his own design.  Sweden decided to adopt the M93 design and in 1894 the Karbin M94 in 6.5x55 became Sweden's military rifle.


Between 1894 and 95 Mauser Werkes produced 10,000 M94 carbines (using Swedish steel) before Sweden's Carl Gustaf factory took over production. In 1896 a much longer rifle was released with a 29" barrel over the original carbines barrel length of 18.5". This model was designated the Gevar M96 and some 40,000 were made by Mauser Werkes between 1896 and 1899 while the Carl Gustaf factory produced 445,000 between 1898 and 1925. The next version of this rifle was the M38 manufactured by Husqvarna. The M38 featured a 24" barrel and micrometer adjustable rear U notch sight. Type 1 M38's were converted M96 rifles while type 2 M38's were newly built rifles.


Swedish Mauser rifles were built and inspected to incredibly high levels of workmanship. The Mauser design was also capable of handling greater pressures than the Krag. All inspected parts received a stamped crown for approval or an X if the part failed inspection and was to be scrapped. Horizontal crowns meant the part was made by Mauser or Carl Gustaf while tilted crowns denoted parts made by Husqvarna. Most rifles were proof tested and the inspection mark for this is a crown stamped on the left of the receiver beside the serial number or on the rear sight of Husqvarna rifles.


Military 6.5x55 ammunition was loaded to a pressure of 3200 ATM which converts to 47008psi. Proof loads developed between 4000 and 4500 ATM which converted (x14.69) give pressures of between 58,760psi and 66,000psi. The original m/94 military load featured a 10.1 gram (156 grain) round nosed bullet which achieved 725m/s (2378fps) in the 29" barreled m/96 rifle, 700m/s (2297fps) in the 24" m/38 rifle and 655m/s (2149fps) in the original 18.5" m/94 carbine. The first pointed bullets were tested between 1910 and 1920 in experimental rifles, the final load appeared in the M/41 sniper rifle and used a 9 gram (139 grain) pointed bullet. This load quickly proved itself superior to the former and in 1944, the 9 gram load replaced all of the previous M94 designated ammunition. The M/41 load achieved 793 m/s (2601fps) in the 29" M/96 barrel, 768 m/s (2519fps) in the 24" m/38 barrel and 730 m/s (2395fps) in the18.5" M/94. Many Swedish rifles still bare a brass disc on the butt which helps tell the user which ammunition the rifle was sighted in for, its zero - and the condition of the bore since its last inspection.


After WWII, Sweden adopted newer self loading rifle designs and released the Swedish Mauser to the civilian market. It is at this point that the 6.5x55 cartridge became known as the 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser or simply the 6.5 Swede. The 6.5x55 offered hunters worldwide the same virtues it had provided the military with; high quality, adequate power, excellent accuracy combined with low recoil. America mostly received the carbine M94 rifles while the longer rifles made it as far as Australia and New Zealand where they remain popular to this day. Having limited knowledge of the Swedish Mauser, American ammunition companies kept sporting loads for the Swede to extremely low pressures. Such loads perform adequately at close ranges, under 50 yards, but are left wanting at further ranges. 


In Europe, the 6.5x55 remained popular for several decades, helped to a great extent by the Norma Ammunition Company of Sweden who loaded the 6.5x55 to full pressures. Nevertheless, by the mid 1990’s, the 6.5 had lost a great deal of its popularity to the ‘modern’ European favorite, the .30-06 Springfield, the larger cartridge being immensely superior when used on Moose.


 

Walter Bell and the 6.5 Mannlicher Schoenauer

After Sweden adopted the 6.5x55 and having had first hand experience with the 6.5x52 Carcano, Austrian designer Ferdinand Ritter Von Mannlicher went on to design both the 6.5x54 cartridge and Mannlicher rifle, adopted by the Austrian and Greek military in 1900 (1900-1940). The sporting version of this rifle was released in 1903 in the form of the famous Mannlicher Schoenauer. A true carbine at just 6 and a half pounds and 38 inches (97cm) overall, the smooth feeding Mannlicher is a highly sought after rifle today.  From the short 17" barrel the 6.5x54 fired a 160 grain bullet at a velocity of 2330fps. The Mannlicher Schoenauer became an instant hit with European hunters and was a favorite of Walter Bell who used 160 grain solid projectiles on a great number of Elephant. The success of the Mannlicher Schoenauer was attributed to the rifle’s quality - giving outstanding accuracy along with low recoil. From 1910 the Mannlicher Schoenauer was sold fitted with a scope which aided accuracy further.


Unfortunately, accuracy aside, many hunters died using the 6.5x54 Mannlicher Schoenauer in Africa after being gored by wounded dangerous game. Unless the CNS was struck directly, the 6.5x54 produced slow kills on dangerous game.


The 6.5x54 Mannlicher and 6.5x52 Carcano rifles were very similar in chamber and bore dimensions.  In fact both held loose dimensions enabling both cartridge types to be fired in either rifle. Groove diameters in either rifle could be as wide as .269" (6.8mm). In recent years, this has posed varying degrees of accuracy problems for reloaders using .264” caliber projectiles. Typical velocities when hand loading for the 27” barreled 6.5x52 Carcano are 2600fps with 120 grain bullets and 2400fps with 140 grain bullets. The 6.5x54 hand loaded and fired from the short Mannlicher carbine gives velocities of 2500fps and 2300fps with 120 and 140 grain bullets respectively. Recently Hornady released a 160 grain .268” round nosed projectile, enabling reloaders to optimize accuracy when using these older rifles. Conservative velocities when hand loading this bullet are 2200fps in the 6.5x52 M91/41 27” barreled Carcano and 2100fps for both the 6.5x52 Carcano and 6.5x54 Mannlicher carbines.

 


Performance

The 6.5x55 has generated a huge amount of interest throughout the world since the influx of surplus military rifles became available on international markets. Articles relating to the Swede appear in every gun magazine yet there is still a lot of misinformation over the performance of the 6.5x55 on game. Authorities state that the Swede is useful for all game up to the size of Moose with its long for caliber bullets giving deep penetration. Comments have also been made that beyond 200 yards the Swede ballistically out performs the .270 while giving less recoil. In truth, the Swede is a rather modest performer. With factory ammunition, performance is generally in the same class as the .30-30. Wounding is slightly narrower than the .30-30 but penetration is usually deeper. The trajectory of factory ammunition is poor.


With light 120 grain bullets hand loaded to between 2900 and 3000fps, the Swede is a fast killer on lighter medium game. Most 120 grain bullets produce shallow penetration therefore this bullet weight is not particularly well suited to larger bodied game unless using the 120 grain Barnes TSX or XLC.


The hand loaded 130 grain bullet weight is neither fish nor foul. It has neither the high SD’s and BC’s of the 140 grain bullet weight or high velocity achieved from hand loaded 120 grain bullets. Performance is identical to budget .270 Winchester factory ammunition at 2900fps.


The 140 grain bullet is the most versatile bullet weight in the Swede. Hand loaded to between 2750 and 2800fps, this combination produces the best balance of wounding versus penetration. Nevertheless, regardless of high BC’s and SD’s, the Swede can be a slow killer at ranges beyond 200 yards.  Conventional projectiles, regardless of SD, often fail to produce deep penetration. The 6.5x55 is simply not in the same class as the .270 which it is often compared to, regardless of hype.


At ranges beyond 200 yards, the hunter should aim to break the foreleg bones of game. Both rear lung and neck shots often result in very slow killing at extended ranges. With care to shot placement, the Swede gives excellent results, so much so that it is all too easy to become lulled into a false sense of security. It is therefore not unusual to have a string of successes followed by an abysmal failure after neglecting the above mentioned shot placement.


A sporterised and scoped Swedish Mauser weighs between 8 1/2 and 9 pounds which makes for extremely balanced shooting. The stout barrels of these rifles can handle repeated firing and if properly bedded and free floated will continue to give acceptable accuracy up until the point where the shooter can no longer see through the heat mirage coming from the barrel. For younger hunters it is important to make sure the stock of a sporterised military rifle is of the correct fit or else felt recoil will be noticeably enhanced. For those not wishing to go to the trouble of reworking the military rifle; there are several factory rifles to choose from including Sako, Tikka, CZ, Blaser as well as the occasional U.S design.


 

1 banner advert resize

 


Factory Ammunition

For many years, Norma produced two loads for the 6.5x55, the 139 grain Vulcan at 2850fps (29" barrel) and the 156 grain Alaska at 2559fps. Both of these loads were used successfully on Sweden's Moose but this deserves an explanation. Firstly, the popularity of the 6.5x55 in Sweden came from the availability of cheap surplus rifles. Secondly, the 6.5x55 has mostly been used by farmers and lower income earners but has otherwise been superseded by more powerful cartridges.


When Norma designed projectiles for the 6.5, some 600 Moose were shot and autopsied which allowed Norma to conclude that flat point bullets deliver the most shock. The resulting flat pointed Vulcan and Alaska were ballistically suited to the Swedish woodlands where shots typically occur under 150 yards.  Unfortunately the poor ballistic coefficients of both of these bullets make them highly susceptible to wind, drop and energy loss at the ranges they are used at in America, Australia and New Zealand. At close ranges, these bullets perform extremely well on medium game and offer immediate shock transfer on even the lightest animals. On Moose, death usually occurs after a run of up to 300 meters.


Norma have recently revised the loadings for the Swede, removing the once popular 139 grain Vulcan load. Current loads include the 120 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip at an anemic 2822fps, the 140 grain Nosler Partition at an equally poor 2690fps and three styles of 156 grain bullet, the Vulcan, Oryx and Alaska, all at 2560fps. The Vulcan is a flat point crimped nose conventional style projectile and as mentioned, is an excellent game bullet for close range hunting. Performance is nevertheless limited by low muzzle velocities. The Alaska is a basic conventional round nose soft point while the Oryx is a core bonded projectile which in the Swede, produces a narrower wound than either the Vulcan or Alaska but gives deeper penetration. Both of the Nosler projectiles are extremely good performers but again, are limited by the mild muzzle velocities.


U.S ammunition brands are typically very poor performers. True velocities from 22 to 24” barrels for Winchester, Federal and PMC 140 grain loads run between 2400fps and 2450fps. At close ranges, these velocities cause little disruption to conventional bullets on impact, giving up to 80% weight retention and outstanding penetration on medium game. That said beyond 50 yards these brands of ammunition offer very poor shock and slow kills are common.

 


Hand Loading

The 6.5x55 is a cartridge that is best utilized with hand loads. The Swede prefers powders in the medium slow to slow burning range such as H4350 (ADI 2209) and H4831sc (ADI 2213sc). For this reason the cartridge gains optimum performance in a 24" (600mm) barrel. All ex-military rifles have a 1:7.5 twist barrel and obtain best accuracy with bullets weighing between 140 and 160 grains. Most military rifles give acceptable accuracy with lighter 120 grain bullets out to 300 yards but very few will give sub MOA accuracy. Modern production sporting rifles such as Sako and Tikka fair a little better due to slower twist rates.


On average though most 24" barreled rifles will give 2950fps with 120 grain bullets, 2750fps with the 140 grain bullet weight and 2500fps with heavy 160 grain bullets. The 140 grain bullet can be driven to a velocity of 2700fps in 20” barrels with careful load development but does lose power at the carbine length of 18.5”. Furthermore, it is quite possible to drive 120 grain bullets at 3000fps and the 140 grain bullet weight at 2800fps from 24” barrels with long case life, using either of the above powders and careful load development. 


There are a vast range of projectiles for the 6.5mm fan to choose from. The most in-expensive are the 120 and 140 grain Remington Core-Lokt projectiles. The 120 grain bullet is dynamite on lighter game. It opens quickly and mushrooms to a huge diameter, vitals are jellified at close moderate ranges. As can be expected, the huge frontal area of the 120 grain CL does not allow it to penetrate well on larger animals.  The most reliable conventional bullet in the 6.5mm caliber is Remington's 140 grain Core-Lokt which opens fast but retains a good shank for deep penetration. 


The 140 grain Core-Lokt is the toughest of the conventional cup and core type projectiles yet does not suffer any loss in wounding potential. The only limitations of the Core-Lokt bullets for use on medium game are the low BC’s of .323 for the 120 grain CL and .435 for the 140 grain bullet, these simply are not great long range bullets. As an example, from a muzzle velocity of 2750fps, the 140 grain CL retains only 2200fps at 275 yards which is detrimental to wide wounding. Wounding becomes narrower again as the CL approaches 2000fps at around 375 yards.


Sierra bullets include an 85 grain HP, a 100 grain HP, the 107 grain MatchKing, the 120 grain MatchKing (BC .430), the 120 grain Pro-Hunter (FBSP), 123 grain MatchKing (BC .510), the 140 grain MatchKing (BC .535), the 140 grain GameKing, the 142 grain MatchKing (BC .559), the 155 grain MatchKing (BC .570) and lastly, the 160 grain semi point Pro-Hunter.

 

Unfortunately, the MatchKing bullets are erratic performers on game. Results are always 50/50, sometimes the SMK will expand and fragment, other times it will produce pin hole wounding. Hunters often become enamored by the high BC’s inherent in the SMK line of bullets but do not take into consideration the potential for slow killing. If the SMK is to be used for game hunting, it is imperative that it is driven into a medium that offers optimum resistance. For example, the 123 grain SMK should be used on game weighing between 40kg and 70kg (90-154lb), the 140 to 155 grain SMK bullets can be used on deer weighing between 80 and 150kg (180-330lb). 


On tough game such as Boar, the 140-155 grain SMK bullets can be used on both light through to larger body weights. In this instance, the SMK becomes quite useful as an intermediate long range / tough medium game bullet. Again, it must be reiterated that the SMK is unpredictable so while it normally produces a wide, extremely violent wound channel on wild pigs, it cannot be relied on to do so every time. To some extent performance can be enhanced by annealing the ogive of the SMK, as one would anneal brass in a shallow tray of water, in this case having the ogives above the water line and heated with a gas torch. Candle flame annealing (see 7mm Rem Mag) produces good but not 100% reliable results with the SMK. The choice of whether to use the SMK as a game bullet is ultimately a personal one. The hunter must weigh the benefits or strengths against potential weaknesses and limitations. The 6.5 caliber SMK’s do have an advantage over heavier SMK bullets such as the 168 and 175 grain SMK projectiles which, due to increased momentum, need quite a tough medium to initiate fragmentation.


Sierra’s 85 and 100 grain HP bullets are designed for varminting. These can be used on lighter medium game but due to low BC’s, low SD’s and low weight, tend to be far less emphatic killers than 120 to 140 grain bullets. Most ex-military Swede’s will not shoot the 85 grain bullet due to stability lost during the long bullet jump combined with excessive yaw induced via the fast twist rate. The 100 grain HP can sometimes be coaxed to produce groups of around 1” at 100 yards in Swedish Mausers.


The 120 grain Sierra Pro-Hunter was once a popular, inexpensive, light game projectile. Performance is certainly nothing to rave about, penetration is fair on light bodied animals, wounding is thorough but not spectacular and with a BC of .356, the Pro-Hunter sheds velocity fairly quickly. This is a basic cup and core projectile which kills in a no fuss manner.


The 140 grain GameKing is a highly frangible bullet. There was a time when western hunters had a choice between this and the 140 grain Interlock while the 140 grain Partition was considered a special occasion bullet, seldom being employed. The GameKing produces slightly wider wounding than the Interlock due to its explosive nature. This bullet is best suited to game weighing no more than 60kg (130lb) although it will handle cross body shots on game weighing as much as 80kg, especially at ranges beyond 150 yards.  This is a good open country bullet for light game species. On heavy bodied deer and especially wild pigs, the GameKing lacks the construction needed for emphatic kills, especially at awkward angles. By the same token, internal wounding after fragmentation is not as wide as wounds produced by the 140 grain A-Max. On tough animals, the GameKing can sometimes produce very slow kills, resulting in lost animals. Readers are urged to be wary of both the GameKing and Interlock in this regard.

 

Sierra’s heavy 160 grain semi pointed soft point Pro-Hunter sits in no man’s land and sales of this projectile tend to be poor. The Pro-Hunter has an excellent jacket design; capable of good penetration on medium sized deer yet is handicapped by a poor BC of .353 which limits its usefulness. The 160 grain SMP is designed as woods hunting bullet and is quite capable of anchoring large bodied game weighing up to 150kg with ease. On heavy medium game such as Elk, the SMP penetrates equally well but wounding potential is limited firstly by low muzzle velocities and secondly, by rapid loss of velocity due to the low BC.  Sierra would do well to produce a 160 grain GameKing and fully pointed Pro-Hunter counterpart, though it would be best suited to the .264 Win mag.


The Hornady range of 6.5mm projectiles include, the 95 grain V-Max, the 100 grain soft point, the 120 grain A-Max, the 129 grain Interlock soft point, the 129 grain SST, the 129 grain InterBond, the 140 grain soft point Interlock, 140 grain SST, 140 grain A-Max, 140 grain BTHP Match and finally, the 160 grain round nose Interlock.


Hornady’s 95 grain V-Max and 100 grain SP are both designed for varminting and like the lightweight Sierra bullets, can be used on light bodied medium game but results are far less emphatic or dramatic than heavier offerings, regardless of potentially high muzzle velocities.


The 129 grain Interlock is an adequate lighter medium game bullet but like so many conventional bullets for the Swede, is fairly lack luster in killing. Kills out to moderate ranges tend to be fast, wounding is adequately broad, and the Interlock is relatively inexpensive to obtain. In theory, the higher speed obtainable with the 129 grain Interlock and its lower momentum has the potential to initiate broader wounding than, for example, the 140 grain Interlock. In practice, the lighter 129 grain grain Interlock shows no advantage.


The 129 grain SST is immensely popular at present. This projectile produces explosive wounding and remains effective out to distances of around 500 yards or 2000fps, quite a feat for a stout jacketed projectile. BC is .485 while SD is .264. This is a good light medium game bullet, effective on body weights up to around 70 (154lb). The 129 grain SST can be pushed to work on larger animals but is not an optimal choice. The 129 grain InterBond is far more reliable in this regard. 


The 129 grain InterBond is suitable for light through to medium body weights of up to 90kg (200lb). On game heavier than 90kg, the power level of the Swede is the limiting factor as opposed to the InterBond bullet design. The InterBond can be used on game weighing as much as 150kg however kills are never as emphatic as such cartridges as the .270/.264 Win Mag, which yield far greater velocities for broader wounding. The InterBond does its best work inside 180 yards (2600fps), can produce slightly delayed but nevertheless clean killing out to 300 yards (2400fps), gradually losing its ability to produce wide wounding thereafter.


The Hornady 140 grain Interlock received a lot of bad press in earlier years for giving narrow wound channels and it has often been suggested that the 6.5mm Interlock is too stout and best suited to the .264 magnum. This could not be further from the truth. At close range, the Interlock sheds its frontal area very quickly as well as losing a great deal of weight (usually over 50%). In some instances, especially on stout or large bodied deer, the 140 grain Interlock disintegrates altogether. At 50 yards the Interlock lacks enough retained weight or SD to exit the rib cage of 70 to 90kg animals hit through the shoulder. At 200 yards the Interlock is limited by the power of the Swede and lacks the momentum required to penetrate the shield of a mature boar and reliably destroy the vitals. Instead, the 140 grain Interlock finds its strengths on light game, just like its competition, the 140 grain GameKing, ideal for game weighing between 15 and 60kg (up to 130lb).


Both the 129 and 140 grain Hornady SST projectiles have lifted the wounding performance of the Swede dramatically, to levels never seen before. Both of these projectiles are prone to jacket core separation and of the two, the 140 grain SST is at least, slightly more delayed in this action as well as producing potentially larger fragments if separation occurs. BC of the 140 grain SST is a very high .520.


Annealing the 6.5mm SST (see 7mm Rem mag) does not seem to give any great improvement. For game weighing less than 80kg (180lb), the 140 grain SST, regardless of jacket core separation, gives deep, broad wounding. This is an excellent all-round bullet for the Swede when used on small to medium sized bodied deer species.


For longer range hunting using the swede, no other bullet can compare to the performance produced by the Hornady 140 grain A-Max. This bullet is best suited to lighter bodied deer under 80kg (180lb) and gives optimum results at impact velocities below 2600fps (beyond 75 yards) which allows the A-Max to shear into large fragments rather than smaller, less lethal particles. Wounding caused by the A-max at ranges of between 300 and 400 yards is such that both exit wounds and bleeding from exit wounds can be easily observed through the hunter’s scope. The A-Max has a BC of .550 and produces wide wounding for clean, extremely fast killing out to 500 yards (2000fps), continuing to produce adequately wide wounding at 1800fps, out at the 600 yard mark.


Hornady’s heaviest bullet is the 160 grain round nose Interlock. This is a soft, fast expanding bullet designed for woods hunting. Regardless of its high SD of .328, the Interlock is limited in performance and best used on light to medium weight animals if deep penetration for typical raking or woods shots is to be expected.


The Speer range of projectiles include the 90 grain TNT Varmint, the 120 grain Hotcor, the 140 grain Hotcor and 140 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw.


The 120 grain Speer Hotcor is best suited to light game. Although the jacket and core are lightly bonded, the Hotcor suffers occasional jacket/core separation when striking the major bones on medium sized animals. Performance is best described as mild, wounding is thorough, and penetration is adequate on game weighing less than 60kg/130lb. Terminal performance of the 140 grain Hotcor (BC .498) is best described as modest; wounding is thorough and uniform while penetration is adequate for light to medium sized deer at varied angles. Unlike the Interlock, the 140 grain Hotcor is less prone to suffer early jacket core separation when used on tough animals such as wild Boar. The Hotcor is an acceptable all around medium game bullet producing fast kills at impact velocities above 2400fps or 200 yards, clean but occasionally delayed kills as velocity approaches 2200fps (310 yards), gradually losing its ability to produce wide, fast bleeding wounds beyond this range.


The 140 grain TBBC is as can be expected, a very tough bullet, best suited to tough game. As is quite often re-iterated in the small bore texts, this type of bullet cannot be expected to produce wide wounds on large, heavy bodied animals due to the limitations of the caliber, not the bullet design. When using the TBBC on tough game, the bullet should be directed into major bone. Penetration is assured as is clean killing - providing the hunter works to the strengths of the TBBC design.


Nosler currently produce a vast range of 6.5 calibre projectiles including the 100 grain Ballistic Tip, the 100 grain Partition, the 120 grain Ballistic Tip, the 125 grain Partition, the 130 grain Accubond, the 140 grain Partition a 140 grain Match BTHP.


Nosler’s 100 grain bullets are not ideally suited to ex-military Swede twist rates and along with this, as previously stated, 100 grain 6.5 caliber bullets do not produce the spectacular performance hunters expect due to low BC’s and SD’s. The 120 grain BT (BC .458) is perhaps the most violent light weight bullet available for the 6.5x55. Wound channels are immensely broad and kills are extremely fast. Bullet blow up is a given out to moderate ranges and due the limited start out weight, this projectile is best suited to lighter animals weighing less than 60kg (130lb). The 120 grain BT tends to retain its ability to produce dramatic wounding out to ranges of around 250 yards, producing wide but less violent wounding as velocities approach 2000fps or 500 yards.


The 125 grain Partition (BC .449) is simply outstanding. This is a good medium game bullet for deer weighing up to 80kg (180lb). The new 130 grain Accubond (BC .488) is another excellent performer. That said, due to the core bonding, wounding is never as explosive as the traditional Partition. The Accubond is perhaps better where maximum meat retrieval is a major concern. This projectile is also well suited to game weighing up to 80kg.


The 140 grain Partition is without a doubt the most effective all around projectile for the Swede. Nothing else comes remotely close. This is a bullet that time after time, produces a deep, broad, violent wound resulting in fast kills. The Partition exits medium game at speeds fast enough to ensure complete disruption of vital organ pressures. Light and lean or large and tough, this is the go to bullet in the Swede, reaching its limit (wide wounding) on game weighing around 150kg (330lb) although it is adequate for use on Elk - unless you are sold on the idea that 450kg (1000lb) body weights are what the Swede was designed for. Wounding is wide down to velocities as low as 2200fps (310 yards) becoming moderate as velocities approach 2000fps or 430 yards. For those who use the Swede and have not hunted with this bullet, try it. The Partition should be driven into the major bones of the forwards chest cavity on game of all weights, not because of the bullet design but due to the power limitations of the Swede. Used this way, the Swede is brought to optimum performance.


Barnes bullets include a 110 grain solid, the 120 grain TSX, 120 grain Tipped TSX (untested at this time of writing), the 120 grain coated XLC bullet, the 130 grain TSX, 130 grain solid and 140 grain XLC. Both the 110 and 130 grain solid boat tail bullets are designed for fur/ hide retrieval.


Every once in a while, during the course of testing for this knowledge base, a cartridge and bullet combination come together in such a way as to produce unique results. This is certainly the case with the Swede and 120 grain Barnes TSX and especially TTSX bullets. These 120 grain bullets have a long bearing surface, ideal for the fast twist rate of the Swede, producing optimum accuracy. The fast twist rate and fairly high muzzle velocity of the Swede combined with the blender blade style Barnes produce a result that, to be blunt, is best described as vicious.


The 120 grain Barnes bullets (BC .381) will take medium sized game end to end with tail on shots as well as giving fast kills during this process. Wounding at close ranges is fierce and wound channels at ranges of between 250 and 300 yards remain very broad if major bones are encountered. This load is perfectly balanced for use on all game up to the size of Elk, again with attention to shot placement due to limitations of the caliber. Wide wounding tapers off after 300 yards (2200fps) and this is the one caveat with these bullets - they are not fully consistent in action. The Barnes bullets need both velocity and or a measure of body weight resistance in order to produce wide wounding. The use of a light bullet such as the 120 grain weight also helps to enhance energy transfer. But if rear lung shots are taken at ranges of 250 yards and beyond, or if the range is simply too long- all bets are off. At extended ranges, the Barnes bullets simply cannot create wide wounds. 


The heavier 130 and 140 grain Barnes bullets are better suited to large, heavy animals where deep penetration is a most critical element. To some extent the 140 grain Barnes (BC .522) is capable of penetration beyond the wounding capacity of the Swede. The 120-140 grain Barnes bullets usually retain exactly 100% bullet weight as 6.5 velocities are not high enough to cause petal damage. Bullet frontal area after penetration is normally around 16mm (for all 6.5 Barnes bullets). At impact below 2200fps, wound channels in the absence of hydraulic shock are 16mm accordingly, the wound being similar to but smaller than a broad head arrow.


Swift produce three projectiles for the Swede, the 120 grain A-Frame, 130 grain Scirocco and 140 grain A-Frame. All are very sound, reliable projectiles. Performance of the A-Frame is very much in line with the Partition, though not quite as violent. The Scirocco is similar to the Accubond and InterBond and IB upon impact which is extremely desirable for the initiation of hydrostatic shock. BC of the 130 grain Scirocco is an incredibly high .571.


Berger produce two long range hunting bullets, the 130 grain VLD (BC .552) and 140 grain VLD (BC .612). Between the velocities of  2400fps and 2000fps the VLD projectiles produce huge wound channels on light bodied game due to the fully annealed, fragile jacket materials. On larger bodied medium game, light weight small bore VLD bullets can sometimes fail to produce both deep and broad wounding. To some extent, the A-max is better in this regard as it shears into large fragments rather than small particles. The 6.5 VLD projectiles are certainly excellent performers but as is the nature of the 6.5, bullet weight and construction must be matched to the job at hand.


Already discussed is the performance of the 139 grain Vulcan bullet. On test medium consisting of compacted wet newsprint, the shock transfer of the Vulcan causes blow back at the point of entry which forces the surface of the medium into a volcano shape. Wounding on game is just as thorough. That said, spectacular as the Vulcan is, it does not give the penetration one would expect of a Moose cartridge and is more akin to conventional projectiles, especially the Remington Core-Lokt. The Vulcan slows down and arrests quickly when striking bone. This and its poor aerodynamic shape are major limitations. 


In recent years the 6.5x55 Ackley Improved wildcat has been receiving praise in both hunting and benchrest circles. Re-chambering a 6.5x55 rifle to the AI is a relatively simple affair. Problems do occur however, after the conversion when over eager hand loaders increase loads too far in an effort to maximize results. From a 26" barrel, typical recorded velocities for the AI are 3100fps with 120 grain bullets and 2900fps with 140 grain bullets. These velocities are pushing pressure limits and realistically, those who want more power should start with a larger case or both a larger case and wider caliber. 

 


Closing Comments

The 6.5x55 is still fairly popular in Europe and the South Pacific, but less so in the States, especially since Remington introduced the identically powered 260 Remington. The 6.5mm bore is highly favored by competitive target shooters, a factor which has contributed greatly to its acceptance and survival in mainstream hunting. Nevertheless, it cannot be reiterated enough that regardless of hype, the Swede and .260 should be used with care.

 

Personally, I have had more failures with this cartridge than any other cartridge I have used. Some of this can be attributed to my own over-confidence after falling for gun rag hype as a younger man. Failures occurred in three instances as a result of bullet blow up and in another two instances as a result of the cartridge being unforgiving with shot placement, one being a rear lung shot, the other, a neck shot taken by a client on a wild pig at 240 yards. Early failures inspired me to learn everything I could about terminal ballistics and rifle accuracy, eventually leading to the business we have today.

 

The 240 yard shot was immensely disappointing, the then new 140 grain SST entered the neck of the pig dead center, glanced off the spine, and exited the opposite side leaving a .75” exit wound. The 40kg (90lb) pig tumbled down a cliff system from spinal concussion but at the end of its fall, used its powerful shoulders to brace its wounded neck, rose to its feet and ran. The pig had no idea of our position and ran towards us.  The client was unable to make a second shot at the moving target. The pig ran within 25 yards of me before it turned and revealed the clearly visible exit wound. The SST had clearly done its job; the Swede simply did not have the velocity to effect wide diffused internal wounding at 240 yards.

 

Today, my Swede continues to serve as an extremely accurate, mild recoiling back up rifle for our hunting clients. With the benefit of hind sight, this rifle is a reliable killer when loaded with the 140 grain Partition driven into the major bones of the chest to maximize wounding on tough animals. At extended ranges, The A-Max, now called ELD-M or the slightly tougher tougher ELD-X provide maximum wounding potential for this cartridge. That said, the Swede is not nearly as forgiving as heavier cartridges, especially when wind drift and bullet drop cause shot placement error.

 

6point5 Partition pig1


Hunting with my Carl Gustaf M96. The stock has a pistol grip and comb added to improve ergonomics when scope shooting while retaining the original stock. The bullet used on this boar was the 140 grain Nosler Partition, one of the very best bullets available for general hunting when using the 6.5x55.

 

Suggested loads: 6.5x55 Barrel length: 24”

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL 140gr Winchester/PMC .287 .450 2450 1865

2 HL 120gr Nosler Bal Tip .246 .458 2950 2318

3 HL 140gr Nosler Partition .287 .490 2750 2351

4 HL 140gr A-max/ SST .287 .550 2750 2351

5 HL 140 A-max/SST Ack Imp .287 .550 2900 2351 

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths  

1 Yards 100 125 211 247 300 350  

  Bt. path +3 +3.1 0 -3 -8.1 -16  

2 Yards 100 150 266 313 350 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.5 0 -3.5 -7 -13.6  

3 Yards 100 150 245 285 325 350 375 400

  Bt. path +3 +3.3 0 -3 -7.25 -10.4 -14 -18

4 Yards 100 150 248 287 325 350 375 400

  Bt. path +3 +3.4 0 -3 -6.7 -9.8 -13 -17

5 Yards 100 150 265 307 325 350 375 400 

 

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 8.25 1929 1157

2 300 6 2392 1524

3 300 6 2248 1571

4 300 5.4 2300 1644

5 300 5 2435 1844 

Note: The 140gr A-max has a BC of .550 while SST has a BC of .520.

 

 6 5 55 swedish mauser 001.jpg


 

  Imperial Metric 

A .480 12.18

B .479 12.17

C 25deg  

D .435 11.05

E .297 7.54

F 1.704 43.29

G .313 7.95

H 2.165 55

Max Case 2.165 55

Trim length 2.155 54.7

Discuss this article or ask a question on the forum here


Copyright © 2007-2017 Terminal Ballistics Research, Ballisticstudies.com

THE PRACTICAL GUIDES TO LONG RANGE HUNTING RIFLES  & CARTRIDGES


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 268 - On Location Titan Reloading

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are On location at Titan Reloading.  

  1. Titan Reloading





Cartridge corner: none tonight


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 267 - Barfight bolt vs semi

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about accuracy...

  1. Accuracy bolt gun vs semiautomatic,  for a regular shooter vs a reloader.

    1. https://youtu.be/ouUG5icSq0o


  1. This question is for mike I live down in Springfield il and I watched the first episode of the podcast the other day and heard that you are from Madison Wisconsin. I will be up there in October going to vortex for something and was wondering if there are any good stores for reloading supplies in the Madison area. Nick (patreon)

  2. I recently built my first 6.5 Creedmoor and will likely begin reloading for that caliber. I have a good bit of fired casings from 243 Win (a caliber we shoot but don’t reload) and 7mm-08 & 308 Win (which we don’t shoot). If lengths are managed, can these be renecked to 6.5CM?  I’ve renecked 30-06 to 270 Win, but in the end I just built up enough stock of 270 to not worry about having to convert 30-06. I’ve also converted 223 to 300 BLK with good results. But with the aggressive Creedmoor shoulder, this seems like it may have a high crush rate and just may not be with the risk. Thoughts? Thx, TJ

  3. Just to point out my opinion on this which I have done many times !  What I have found is with 69smk it’s very hard but can be done but it gets down to 45 ACP velocity by that point. The best setup I have found is using 80 ELD for 900 -1100 yards which is the farthest range I have to shoot now ! My 80eld load for my 223 rem I have .9 mil of wind hold at 1000yards and 8.7 mil of drop with repeatable results and NO 2x4 to open any bolts lol ! Compared to my 6.5 creedmoor with 140 ELD I have .6 mil of wind 8.0 drop this is all with a full value wind of 5 mph . Guess my point is that with a heavy bullet if you have the correct twist rate of 1-8” or better 80 elds will do fine at my elevation which is 800 feet above sea level. I’m actually still super sonic at 1100 yards with a velocity of 1287fps at 1100 yards But of course elevation can play a part in this but definitely doable with great results! The reason viable option is COST as being reloaded I like saving money lol.  Yes it’s not as good as the 6.5 creedmoor but it’s not that far off and you can look at it as good practice and you learn the wind better with a bullet with less ability to buck the wind but I must say .3mil difference between the 223 and the 6.5 CM it’s not to bad at all if I must say! As a side note, check into the Sinclair Mandrel die and mandrels they sell as I have started using them to set neck tension they have improved my ES AND SD a ton SD in the single digits just something you all might want to experiment with it is one more step as I you take the sizing button out of the sizing die and use this as a final step ! The reason is it sets the neck tension on the down stroke and not in the up stroke which could throw your shoulder bump off when pulling the button back threw the neck. Also you have all the imperfections pushed back to the outside of the neck instead of them maybe pushing on the bullet which can cause inconsistencies in your neck tension! Either way keep up with the good podcast and if you're ever in southern Indiana hit maybe we can shoot on my range! Aim small miss small ;) Sincerely, Adam





Cartridge corner: 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 266 - oddball go no go

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about go no go gauges, and other things.

  1. Does anyone load for the .38 S&W?

  2. Paul Nelson posted on RLPG FB: This question is for Jim Fleming;  When you formed your 7mm AI brass why did you use the corn meal vs just shoot a bullet down the barrel? By shooting a bullet you could form the brass, break in the barrel at the same time. I've reloaded a few wildcats in my day and except where the shoulder was moved foward and the neck reduced  I loaded up a bullet in a near normal load and fired it. Examples .223 AI I just shot standard of 223 loads, same with 22-250 AI along with 6mm Remington AI. Other wildcats like 30 and 357 Herrett have a rim but I still used a handloader to expand out the case. Cases like the 6 mm bench rest I needed to do the corn meal and wad to format cases do to case neck thinking when forming cases from 243 Winchester once Remington stopped producing bench rest brass that was prethinned in production.


  1. Hello All, A friend of mine recently got ahold of a type 99 Arisaka in 7.7 jap. I suggested he get a headspace gauge set as the bolt is not matching to the rifle so he could check headspace before we went shooting. Unfortunately there doesn’t appear to be any gauges available from the leading manufacturers as it’s not a SAAMI registered cartridge. This led us down a rabbit hole of questions that I’m now pitching towards y’all. 1-Since 7.7 jap is not SAAMI, how do we determine a “safe” chamber? We’re not worried about the strength of the rifle, but the potential for failure of the cases, as he will be reloading.  2-RCBS offers reloading dies for 7.7. What are the dimensions of the dies if there’s no SAAMI spec? 3-Do you think RCBS or other die makers would provide their data for a toolmaker to make custom headspace gauges to match a die set? It appears that companies would make custom gauges, but we have no dimensions to provide them. 4-What dimensions would ammo makers, such as Steinel or Norma, use when making this Non-SAAMI ammo? Other than 7.7 and 6.5 jap we aren’t sure how many other cartridges are out there with this issue, or if others have figured this all out and we’re late to the party, but we’re hoping you guys can give some insight.Many Thanks! Sean   

  2.  

7.7x58

Imperial

Metric 

A

.473

12.01

B

.472

11.99

C

23 deg

 

D

.430

10.92

E

.338

8.58

F

1.870

47.5

G

.413

10.49

H

2.283

58

Max Case

2.283

58

Trim length

2.273

57.7



    1. 7.7 Arisaka Go No Go






Cartridge corner:The 6.5×53mmR or .256 Mannlicher is a late 19th-century rimmed centerfire military rifle cartridge similar to other early smokeless powder designs. It was the first of a series of 6.5-millimetre (0.26 in) Mannlicher cartridges[1] and became the standard Romanian service rifle cartridge from 1893 to 1938,[3] and the standard Dutch service riflecartridge from 1895 to 1945.[2] Dutch ammunition with cartridge cases made of brass (pre-occupation) or steel (under German occupation) may be encountered on the American surplus market. In both instances, the primer pocket is Berdan-style, of an unusual type (Roth-patent), and features a central flash hole running through the center of the integral Berdan anvil. When examining fired cases from the inside with a flashlight, this design gives the false impression of a Boxer primed cartridge case.

Gallery[edit]

For the handloader, Boxer-primed cartridge cases can be made by resizing and trimming .303" British brass. 

 

6.5×53mmR

Military cartridge

Type

Military rifle cartridge[1]

Place of origin

Austria-Hungary[1]

Service history

In service

1893-1945

Used by

Netherlands[2]

Romania[3]

Kingdom of Portugal[4]

Wars

Aceh War 

World War I[3]

World War II[2]

Production history

Designed

1892[3]

Specifications

Case type

Rimmed, bottleneck[5]

Bullet diameter

6.65 mm (0.262 in)

Neck diameter

7.55 mm (0.297 in)

Shoulder diameter

10.75 mm (0.423 in)

Base diameter

11.48 mm (0.452 in)

Rim diameter

13.4 mm (0.53 in)

Rim thickness

1.25 mm (0.049 in)

Case length

53 mm (2.1 in)

Ballistic performance

 

 

 

Bullet mass/type

Velocity

Energy

 

159 gr (10 g) RN

2,433 ft/s (742 m/s)

2,050 ft⋅lbf (2,780 J)

 

Source(s): Rifles and Machine Guns[5]

.256 Mannlicher / 6.5x53R Reloading Data[6]

 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 265 - splitenboomin

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about presses and some wildcats.

  1. Hi guys,I have been listening to the podcast for year and a half and learned lots. Travis was talking about PRS in episode 259.. Thought I would say hi and let you know I have competed in PRS/field/hunting style matches in Montana for the last 3 years, still new new at it considering others that I shoot with, but you learn a lot very quickly. I reload all my hunting and match ammo, so consistency of ammo and fundamentals of shooting are keys to making it work. If any of you guys or your listeners want information about precision rifle, long range hunting and or competition reloading I would be more than happy to talk to you about in email, or even on the show.  Thanks for the work you guys put into the show..

  2. I have heard you and co hosts speak of overbore cartridges and I don't understand what you are talking about. Could you please elaborate on this? Thanks for the podcasts and I hope you have had a chance to try out the Lee Auto Drum powder measure.Take care, Rob

  3.  I have been reloading for about 2 years on a lee turret press, and I am wanting to upgrade. I have been looking at progressive so I can load rounds more per session, i mostly load pistol rounds. I have landed on the Dillon and was wondering if you all thought the 650 was worth the extra money over the 550 any input would be helpful . Love your show btw Thanks Jeff




Cartridge corner:  22/30-30 Ackley Improved

 

Load Development

.22-30-30 Ackley Improved 40 Degree

By Gil Sengel

1 LOAD DEVELOPMENT • May 2015

The .22-30-30 Ackley Improved 40 Degree (.22-30) is of the cartridge type dear to the hearts of serious handloaders who would rather discuss muzzle velocities and trajectories than sports statistics. It exists in that murky responsible to-no-one world of the wildcat cartridge; a house of mirrors where (before the advent of inexpensive chronographs) literally anything one could imagine was possible – and many shooters had very active imaginations!

From a historical perspective, the .22-30 represents a transition. It is the last of the old-time rimmed varmint cartridges. At the same time, it represents the then-evolving modern case shape featuring minimum body taper, large powder capacity and a sharp shoulder angle.

Designer of the .22-30 was a fellow by the name of Parker O. Ackley. Anyone who has studied the rifle has heard of P.O. Ackley. Besides owning his own shop, he was an instructor in the Gunsmith Degree Program of Trinidad State Junior College in Trinidad, ColoCases were filled with cornmeal after a fireforming charge of Bullseye was determined and dumped into the case.

loaddata.com May 2015 • LOAD DEVELOPMENT 2

While in Trinidad, Ackley did much of the experimental work that led to his two-volume Handbook for Shooters and Reloaders, a must-read for serious handloaders. The exact date for the first .22-30 is hard to pin down, because wildcats aren’t formally introduced. The late 1940s is pretty certain. Research shows it to have been rather popular for a wildcat. Thus there are rifles not being shot for lack of current data. That is about to change.

Rifles found chambered for this round are quite varied. Heavybarreled, single-shot, .22-caliber varmint rifles had been the rage since the 1930s, so the Winchester Single Shot and Stevens 44½ were rebarreled. Mauser actions were everywhere, and all it took was opening the bolt face .025 inch to accommodate the .30-30 rim. Rounds would even feed from most magazines. This seems odd today, but at the time many riflemen mistakenly believed rimmed cases could handle higher pressures than rimless cases because of the extra metal in the rim. 

Then there are the leverguns. Winchester .30-30s were not candidates, but the Savage 99 had been made in .30 WCF since 1900. Ackley himself recommended rebarreling 99s to his wildcat, because the magazine could use pointed bullets. The rifle used in load development is not built on one of the old actions. It is a strong Ruger No. 3 that left the factory firing .223 Remington rounds. Purchased a few years ago at a gun show, the seller knew nothing of the rifle’s history. Since the No. 3 wasn’t available in .223 until about 1979, it would be interesting to know why it was rechambered to the old wildcat.

The rifle has had the integral front sight band turned flush with the barrel and its crown recut to a flat target style. Barrel length is 22 inches. Factory-tapped holes are provided for attaching optional Ruger-made scope bases. I had several sets at one time but could now only find four rear bases. Weaver bases and rings were then used. The scope is an old 10x Redfield silhouette model. Reloading dies did not come with the rifle. It’s no secret that wildcat dies are becoming hard to get, often requiring months of waiting. Thus it was a surprise to find this Ackley wildcat listed in the current Redding Reloading catalog as a Series D die set. A call to Redding confirmed not only that a two-die set was in stock, but that a chamber cast was not needed. I was told the wildcat was new enough (post-World War II) that chamber dimensions were fairly well standardized. The full-length sizer worked perfectly.

Load Development

3 LOAD DEVELOPMENT • May 2015 loaddata.com

Final fireforming resulted in perfectly shaped brass. A Forester neck turning tool was used to achieve proper neck thickness. Also required were case-forming dies. Although available, special dies are not needed, as the only dieforming required is necking down the .30-30 to .22. This can be done using standard, full-length sizing dies from other die sets. Handloaders are natural scroungers, and the things we scrounge most are loading dies and fired brass. Any cartridge we ever hope to own is fair game. The next best thing is a friend who has built up a good supply of both.

Sorting through my die stash yielded .30-30, 7mm-08, 6.5 Japanese, .250 Savage, .243 Winchester and .22-250 Remington. All are about the same length as the .30-30. Obviously, other dies could be substituted. Brass used was from a large bulk purchase of factory-new Winchester cases obtained for other projects.

Cases are first sized in the .30 WCF die to iron out any deformity in the necks. Failure to do this will cause many necks to collapse inward during one of the reduction operations. Cases are then run into the other dies (expander assemblies removed) in turn, reducing neck diameter and making it just slightly longer than the finished .22-30 neck (about .325 inch). The final die is a .22-250 Remington rather than the .22-30, because the latter collapsed cases when reducing the neck from 6mm to .22. Apparently this was due to the sharp shoulder in the wildcat die. Cases should be sized only far enough to allow the action to close.

Now comes the fireforming step. It is simple, cheap and has been used since at least the 1920s. Five grains

of Bullseye pistol powder is placed in a primed case, then it is filled to the mouth with dry cornmeal cereal dumped in through a powder funnel. A ball of toilet tissue pressed into the case mouth keeps the cereal in place. Chamber, point skyward and fire. Eighty cases were formed for the project with no losses. Full-length sizing in the Redding die with the expander in place is the next step. Reduction from .30 to .22 caliber made the neck walls too thick to allow a round to chamber with a bullet seated. Outside neck turning to give .012 inch wall thickness took care of this. Trimming to standard .30-30 trim length of 2.030 inches finished the job. Case annealing must be mentioned, because normally this much re-forming would require neck annealing somewhere in the process. I kept going until a ruined case indicated it was time to anneal, but Gil used a Ruger No. 3 .22-30-30 to work up test loads.

loaddata.com May 2015 

• LOAD DEVELOPMENT 4 A chamber cast and a reverse seated bullet how the short throat length encountered in the Ruger No. 3. Gil is not certain if this length is standard. A Redding micrometer seating die saved time when changing bullets. that never happened – not even during fireforming. Twenty cases were annealed after fireforming then used randomly to verify maximum loads and in accuracy testing, but it proved unnecessary. There was simply no difference from unannealed cases. Many of the unannealed cases have now been fired eight times with no failures. I will probably anneal them all now anyway, just because I think it’s the right thing to do.

Appropriate powders listed were either on hand or enough could be begged or borrowed for load development. Charges were increased until measurable case head expansion of .0005 inch was reached. Loads were then reduced until there was no expansion in previously unfired cases. Bullets were seated .030 inch off the lands using a Redding micrometer seating die, which made the operation simple. Note there is no extreme spread or standard deviation in the load table. This is because numbers for my rifle are meaningless for your rifle. Throat length, cartridge length, primer, bullet pull, crimp and other details can greatly alter results. If uniform velocities are needed for extremely long range shooting, they must be measured for the individual rifle and component combination being used. The Hornady 60-grain softpoint produced round, five-shot, 1.45- inch or smaller groups at 100 yards, except for H-414, which didn’t go under 1.6 inches. Clusters using Load Development H-380 and CFE 223 kept getting smaller as velocity went up. Twist of the Ruger barrel is one in 10 inches. Data for the Sierra 55-grain BlitzKing shows 3,600 fps was achieved with two powders. While several five-shot groups under an inch were fired, only CFE 223 would average that for three consecutive tries.

Ruger single shots have their idiosyncrasies, but there was no time to look into them properly. Other 55-grain bullets shot for pressure and accuracy were the Hornady V-MAX, Sierra GameKing spitzer boat-tail, Sierra Varminter spitzer and Nosler Ballistic Tip. Pressure-wise, the first three track with the BlitzKing and can be used depending upon whichever is available. The Nosler reached maximum pressure using roughly .5 grain less powder than the others, yet velocities were equal or very close. Perhaps this is due to the Ballistic Tip’s solid base construction. Results of the Sierra 50-grain BlitzKing show 3,700 fps was easily reached and 3,800 fps obtained with CFE 223. Again the Hornady V-MAX turned in essentially the same pressure and velocity numbers. CFE 223 and Varget stood out in the accuracy department but still wouldn’t allow three groups to average quite one inch. The Hornady 40-grain V-MAX was included to provide a highvelocity option for weaker actions barreled to the .22-30. The magic 4,000 fps velocity was reached with six powders at top pressure. Accuracy was very good. Unfortunately, not enough bullets remained to test all the lighter powder charges. However, I did shoot two groups each with H-335 and IMR-4064. The first was unchanged from the top load, and IMR-4064 shot better. Granted, this was severely limited, but it is encouraging.

Regarding old rifles that will be found chambered for the .22-30, the strongest are the Mausers; Winchester single shots are next. Cutting the top charge a grain or two for the Stevens 44½ and Martini would be advised. Since Ackley recommended rebarreling Savage 99s originally chambered in .30 WCF, a drop of 3.0 to 3.5 grains should put pressure in the 38,000 CUP maximum range of that cartridge. Don’t worry about velocity loss. Classic rifles will have barrels of 24 to 26 inches that will Bullet seating was done with a Huntington Portable Tool. An RCBS AmmoMaster press was used for the last case-forming step. give back much of it compared to my rifle’s 22-inch barrel. Also, using the 40-grain bullet leaves plenty of power and flat trajectory out to the accuracy limits of the levergun. In summation, the .22-30 surprised me; it’s almost a .22-250 Remington. The Ruger No. 3 is not ideal because of the excessive blast from its short barrel. Certainly somewhere, however, there is a neglected Winchester single shot or Mauser with a long tube and 20x Unertl looking for a new home and varmints to conquer.

 

Publisher’s Note: This Load Development article was taken from our 2015 Varmint Rifles & Cartridges Special Edition. It is currently available on newsstands or through Wolfe Publishing Company. You can purchase it online at: www.riflemagazine.com/catalog/ detail.cfm?ProductID=1901.

Link to above article… https://loaddata.com/articles/PDF/LD-45%20Sengel.pdf

 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 264 - decapping and swaging courtesy of FW Arms

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are showing how FW Arms dies work.

  1. FW Arms dies





Cartridge corner: .264 Winchester Magnum

History

With the popularity of the 6.5 caliber in Europe it is no wonder that the first 6.5 caliber magnum was developed in Germany. The 6.5x68 Schuler was designed in 1938, based on the successful 8x68 case. RWS adopted the cartridge, released it in 1939 and it has remained in use ever since. RWS list two loads for this very old magnum, a 93 grain KS (cone point) at 3950fps and a 127 grain KS at 3450fps. With a slow 1:11" twist, 140 grain bullets do not stabilize well in factory (Mannlicher) rifles. 


The .264 Winchester Magnum was the first U.S magnum to be based on the 6.5 caliber. Released in 1958, the .264 was designed to compete against the popular Weatherby rifles and cartridges, at nearly half the price. Introduced in the Model 70 Westerner rifle with a 26” barrel, the .264 quickly gained a solid following. Unfortunately, its popularity ended almost overnight when Remington released their 7mm Remington Magnum. The 7mm provided more versatility because of a greater bullet weight selection, especially heavier bullets suitable for larger animals.


Since that time, the .264 has become somewhat of an oddity, highly regarded by 6.5mm fans but otherwise ignored in mainstream hunting circles. Winchester produced two variations of rifle chambered in .264, the 26” barreled Westerner and 24” barreled Featherweight. The Featherweight version was created due to customer demand but mostly rejected by those who wanted it because of its loss in velocity, high recoil and muzzle blast. The final nail in the .264’s coffin occurred as hunters began to complain about excessive throat erosion due to the high chamber temperatures induced by the over bore cartridge. Winchester discontinued production of rifles chambered in .264 several decades ago however many rifles in good order are still in circulation along with custom rifles appearing from time to time.

 


Performance

The .264 Winchester Magnum is a powerful, fast killing, highly effective medium game cartridge and does so out to long ranges. Countless Elk have been taken with the .264 and game of this size should be considered the common sense upper limit when working to the .264’s strengths.

 

Much has changed in the world of hunting since the introduction of the .264 and this cartridge is really only coming into its own today thanks to both long range competition and long range hunting. The 6.5 caliber is now heavily supported by a plethora of long range, high BC, highly frangible at low velocity projectiles which optimize the performance and versatility of this cartridge considerably.  Furthermore, with 140 grains being the heaviest bullet in general use, the recoil of the .264 is “capped” within moderate levels.

 

Killing performance with controlled expanding projectiles generally falls off at ranges of between 325 yards (140 grain bullets) and 400 yards (130 grain bullets). Beyond these ranges, the hunter must use either extremely careful shot placement or utilize a soft match bullet, specifically, either the 130 grain Berger VLD, the 140 grain A-max or the 140 grain Berger VLD.

 

In recent years, wildcatters have necked down the 7mm WSM to form a wildcat 6.5WSM. Velocities produced by the WSM duplicate those produced by the .264, the major difference being that the WSM is able to use a short action rather than the long action used by the .264. The WSM is a beltless design which has the potential to produce smoother feeding than the belted .264.


 

 


Factory Ammunition

Initial factory loads for the .264 produced by Winchester featured a 140 grain bullet at an advertised 3200fps from a 26” test barrel however sporting rifle velocities fell far short of these figures. Today, both Winchester and Remington advertise 140 grain soft point loads (24” test barrels) at a mild 3030fps. Of these modern loadings, only Winchester achieves its stated velocity with the 140 grain PowerPoint in 24” sporting barrels. In 26” sporters, this load gives approximately 3100fps.


The PowerPoint is an explosive medium game bullet at close to moderate ranges. That said, this bullet has an extremely poor BC of .384 which handicaps the potential of the .264 considerably. Performance is certainly not consistent, on the one hand, this load is explosive with adequate but shallow penetration at close range while at 300 yards, wounds are narrow but penetration is deep. Remington also list a 140 grain Core-Lokt load at the same velocity but again with a relatively poor BC. Nevertheless, this projectile is somewhat more consistent in performance, less prone to bullet blow up and though penetration is not exceptionally deep, the Core-Lokt will always produce a free bleeding exit wound on lighter medium game.

 


Hand Loading

Brass is readily available for the .264 Winchester Magnum. In earlier years, 4831 was the slowest burning rate available but today, H1000 can be used to squeeze the last few fps out of the .264 - providing a 26” barrel is used. From a 26” barrel, IMR/H 4831 powders produce 3300fps with 120 grain bullets, 3200fps with 130 grain bullets, 3100fps with the standard 140 grain bullet and 2900fps with 160 grain bullets. Using slower H1000, these velocities can sometimes be increased by70fps.

 

As many readers will guess, the 120 grain bullet weight is a little too light for best all around performance in the .264 Winchester Magnum. Furthermore, light bullets and high powder charges tend to cause unnecessary throat wear. The one exception, as far as optimum utilization goes, is the 120 grain Barnes TSX driven at 3300fps. This bullet is dynamite on a huge variety of game and body weights up to the size of Elk. Wide, disproportionate to caliber wounding can be expected out to 300 yards.


Hornady produce three projectiles which produce extremely good results in the .264 including the 130 grain InterBond, the 140 grain SST and 140 grain A-Max.


The 130 grain InterBond produces hydrostatic shock at impact velocities above 2600fps or 300 yards from a muzzle velocity of 3200fps. Wounds at this range tend to be wide. As velocity approaches 2400fps (410 yards) wounding performance begins to deteriorate, showing a noticeable reduction in fast bleeding for fast killing. At 2200fps or 540 yards, wounds are narrow. Due to the high muzzle velocity and high BC of .485, the InterBond is quite an effective all round bullet, ideal for a wide range of game weights up to 150kg (330lb) and adequate for deer species weighing up to 320kg (700lb) out to 400 yards. The InterBond can be used in conjunction with the 129 grain SST which has the capacity to render wide wounding at extended ranges. That said, the 130 grain SST is not quite as reliable as its 140 grain counterpart when used on large bodied game. But even this statement holds contradictions as at 2400fps, the 6.5mm caliber has inherent limitations.  


The 140 grain SST really is a spectacular killer. The .264 Win gives this bullet the velocity it needs to show its strengths. Widely diffused wounding can be expected out to ranges of around 400 yards (2400fps). Fast kills and wide exit wounds are the hallmarks of the 140 grain SST when used on light to medium weight deer species. Beyond 400 yards the 6.5 bore simply does not have the capacity to render wide wounds, using controlled expanding bullets. The SST will produce several clean fast kills followed by the occasional and unexpected immensely slow kill - a fault of the bore diameter, not the SST.


Hornady’s 140 grain A-Max achieves wide wounding at velocities below 2400fps due to mechanical wounding. The A-Max tears into large fragments, creating a deep, broad, fast killing wound. Unfortunately, the 140 grain A-max is not an optimal performer at close ranges on stout bodied game due to occasional surface bullet blow up, limiting vital wounding, although wounding through vitals will still occur. This bullet comes into its own at 2600fps (290 yards), producing excellent performance out to 700 yards (2000fps) and further (down to 1800fps), especially if bone is struck to initiate expansion. If the A-Max is to be used as an all-round bullet, the hunter must develop the mindset of neck/ head shooting stout bodied game at ranges inside 150 yards. Between 150 and 300 yards, performance on cross body shots on game weighing less than 80kg (180lb) is acceptable. The A-max is not well suited to game weighing above 80kg (180lb) due to its limited weight and bore diameter.


Nosler are truly the saving grace of the small bores when used on stout bodied game. The results in the field are obvious, measurable and repeatable. Nosler produce three useful bullets, the 125 grain Partition, the 130 grain Accubond and 140 grain Partition. 


The 125 grain Partition has a BC of .449. Driven at 3250fps, fast kills on light bodied deer species can be expected out as far as 400 yards, clean but slightly delayed killing out as far as 630 yards (2000fps). The 130 grain Accubond is much the same as the 129 grain InterBond. This bullet is not quite as spectacular in performance as the Partition and the BC of .488 is not much higher than the original design however meat damage is minimal.


The 140 grain Nosler Partition is an excellent bullet for the .264 Win. One of the major factors that contribute to its performance, is that the 140 grain Partition combines full expansion with full and rapid exit wounding. At close ranges, exit wounds on medium game can be up to and above 3” in diameter. At longer ranges, exit wounds tend to be much smaller however, the results are emphatic. As is suggested in the 6.5x55 text, regardless of the extra power generated by the .264, the hunter can bring the 6.5mm bore to full potential by simply driving the Partition into major bones of the forwards chest cavity on medium game. One method for all ranges past 100 yards, one result.


The140 grain Partition reaches its limits when used on Elk sized game. This projectile can suffer bullet blow up at close ranges when impacting heavy bone and is better suited to medium game weighing up to 180kg (400lb). 


For large, densely muscled, heavy boned deer, nothing comes close to either 120,130 or 140 grain Barnes bullets. On heavy animals, readers must understand that the 6.5 caliber is somewhat limited in its ability to produce wounding, regardless of penetration. The 120 grain Barnes is a very flexible bullet, ideal for light through to large bodied medium game producing very wide, deep wounds. Inside 300 yards, wounding is very similar to the .300 Win Mag loaded with conventional 180 grain bullets. The performance of this particular bullet is unique and cannot be generalized. The 130 grain Barnes is better suited to game weighing between 90 and 320kg (200-700lb) while the 140 grain bullet, as can be expected, is better suited to game weighing between 180 and 320kg (400-700lb).


The 140 grain Barnes has the ability, when driven at 3100fps, to completely penetrate a 600kg (1300lb) animal. That said, the wound channel is narrow on game of this size which translates into slow bleeding and therefore slow killing with ordinary chest shots. 


Berger produce two long range hunting projectiles, the 130 grain VLD and 140 grain VLD. Of the two, the heavier 140 grain bullet has the potential to produce more fragments than the 130 grain bullet, although the differences are small. The only trouble with the VLD is that after impact and fragmentation, the fragments are small. In a heavier caliber firing heavy bullets, this performance is excellent but from a 140 grain bullet, penetration on large bodied medium game is limited, producing best results at impact velocities between 2200fps and 2000. Nevertheless, on lean bodied deer species, the 140 grain VLD with its high BC of .612 is effective out to 800 yards (2000fps) and further if bone is struck. Were the .264 Win Mag more popular, it would most likely be feasible for Berger to create a 160 grain VLD with a BC of around .850. Muzzle velocities would be high due to the fact that over bore cartridges do not really lose a lot of velocity past a certain point in bullet weight, especially with the low bearing surface design of the VLD. From a MV of 3000fps, such a bullet would render large wounds on a wide range of deer species out to a range of around 970 yards.


 

Closing Comments

The 6.5mm bore diameter has really gained a great deal of attention in recent years due to long range competition and long range hunting. The .264 is vastly superior to the smaller 6.5’s when used for open country hunting, even at 300 yards which is considered short range today. Furthermore, the .264 is just as useful at close ranges as it is comfortable in open country.

 

Suggested loads: .264 Winchester Magnum

Barrel length: 26”

No

ID

 

Sectional Density

Ballistic Coefficient

Observed  MV Fps

ME

Ft-lb’s

1

FL

140gr Winchester PP

.287

.385

3100

2987

2

HL

120gr Nosler Bal Tip

.246

.458

3300

2901

3

HL

129gr InterBond

.264

.485

3200

2933

4

HL

140gr Partition

.287

.490

3100

2987

5

HL

140gr Amax/ SST

.287

.550

3100

2987

6

HL

140gr VLD

.287

.640

3100

2987

 

 

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Yards

100

150

278

319

350

375

400

425

 

Bt. path

+3

3.7

0

-3

-6.1

-9

-12.25

-16

2

Yards

100

175

310

352

375

400

425

450

 

Bt. path

+3

+4

0

-3

-5

-7.5

-10.4

-13.6

3

Yards

100

175

299

342

375

400

425

450

 

Bt. path

+3

+3.9

0

-3

-6.1

-8.8

-11.8

-15.2

4

Yards

100

150

287

328

350

375

400

425

 

Bt. path

+3

+3.8

0

-3

-4.9

-7.5

-10.4

-13.7

5

Yards

100

150

290

332

350

375

400

425

 

Bt. path

+3

+3.8

0

-3

-4.5

-7

-9.8

-13

6

Yards

100

150

294

332

350

375

400

425

 

Bt. path

+3

+3.8

0

-3

-4.1

-6.4

-9.1

-12.1

 

 

No

At yards

10mphXwind

Velocity

Ft-lb’s

1

300

6.8

2421

1821

2

300

5.1

2698

1939

3

300

5

2641

1998

4

300

5.2

2559

2035

5

300

4.6

2615

2125

6

300

3.9

2680

2232

6

850

35.6

2002

1246


 

 

 

Imperial

Metric 

A

.532

13.51

B

.513

13.03

C

25deg

 

D

.490

12.45

E

.298

7.57

F

2.040

57.82

G

.254

6.45

H

2.500

63.50

Max Case

2.500

63.50

Trim length

 

 


Discuss this article or ask a question on the forum here


Copyright © 2007-2017 Terminal Ballistics Research, Ballisticstudies.com


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 263 - Hero Hunt

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking with Joe Towers from Hero Hunt.

  1. Hero Hunt Inc.

    1. What was the inspiration?

    2. How did you take it from the idea to reality?

    3. How many hunts a year?

    4. What types of hunts?






Cartridge corner: Bergmann 6.5mm

Of the three calibers available in the 1896 model Bergmann pistol, the 6.5mm No.3 was the most popular. Approximately 4,000 of these guns were produced, and they found a worldwide following. We have examples below of guns sold to Thailand and through the English Westley Richards company, for example.

The No.3 pistol was pretty much identical in concept to the 5mm No.2 Bergmann, but scaled up for the slightly larger 6.5mm cartridge. There were a few differences, which we will discuss in a moment. First, though, let’s take a look at the 6.5mm Bergmann ammunition. Like the 5mm variety, the 6.5mm was initially produced without an extractor groove, as the first several hundred No.3 pistols were made without extractors (see the article on the No.2 for more explanation of this). In addition to having a significant taper to the case body, the 6.5mm was also a bottlenecked design. Because of the popularity of the No.3 pistol, the ammo was manufactured by several companies – Wilson lists loadings by Eley, DWM, a company called Deutsche Metallpatronen Fabrik, and a couple not identified by maker. These ranged from DWM’s 65 grain bullet at 722fps (220 m/s) to an 81.7 grain bullet at 775 fps (236 m/s). Compared to other cartridges of roughly the same diameter like the 6.35mm Browning (.25 ACP), these were unusually heavy bullets, and thus unusually long. Consider that 80 grains was a standard bullet weight for the 7.63mm Mauser.

6.5mm Bergmann cartridges (with and without extractor groove) compared to a modern .22LR for context.

Wilson grants the 6.5mm Bergmann with “appreciable stopping power” (particularly with the lead bullets), and rates it much superior to the .25 ACP (which was not introduced until 1905). That may be setting the bar pretty low today, but it was a respectable achievement for a safe and reliable pocket pistol in 1896.

In terms of design, the No.3 Bergmann did use a dust cover over the ejection port, which reciprocated automatically with the bolt. The smaller No.2 did not include this feature. In addition, shortly after the beginning of No.3 production the method of retaining the barrel was changed. Early examples use a retaining screw and a lug on the barrel, but the lug was changed for a fully threaded barrel fairly quickly. In these models, removing the barrel requires removing the retaining screw and then unscrewing the barrel. Since the retaining screw holds it in place and maintains headspace, the barrel does not have to be torqued down when installed – thus making is still easy to remove for cleaning.

Bergmann was willing to accommodate quite a few design alterations, including different barrel lengths, different grips, and even things like set triggers for target shooting. Here, for example, is a target model of the No.3 in 6.5mm, complete with improved sights, a 7.25 inch long barrel, and set trigger:

(Two additional photos of this pistol are posted below)

Loading the No.3 was a process identical to the earlier pistol variants – see my article on the No.2 for details. The clips, of course, were larger to accommodate 5 rounds of 6.5mm ammo, and not interchangeable with other calibers of Bergmann.

On all the versions of the 1896 Bergmann you will find a maker’s mark showing a bearded miner holding a pickaxe. There are two versions of this mark, however. The basic one has just the miner inside an oval, and this was used on pistol manufactured at the Bergmanns Industriewerke. As time went on, though, Bergmann’s own factory began tooling up for automobile production as well, and Bergmann (ever the business-minded industrialist) outsourced production of pistols when he ran short of factory floor space. The company the built them on contract was V.C Schilling or Suhl, Germany (a name which will be recognized by anyone interested in German arms). The guns made by Schilling use the same miner emblem, but with “GUGGENAU” above his head and “V.C.S. SUHL” below his feet. As best I can tell, there is no particular difference in quality or mechanical detail between the two types.

Bergmann logo as used on pistols made under contract by V.C Schilling. (photo from Unblinking Eye)Bergmann logo as used on pistols made directly by Bergmanns Industriewerke (photo from Unblinking Eye)

There are references made in print to combination holster/stocks being available as a factory option for the No.3, but these are very rare.

I noted in my article on the No.2 Bergmann that virtually all of those that I have seen are marked “611” on the rear left side of the barrel. Well, the No.3 pistol exhibit a similar trend, with roughly 75% of the ones I have seen having a “278” stamped in that same location (the ones that do not have it are blank, not stamped with any other number there). Again, I do not know the significance of this, although it is seen on pistols with both the early and late type of barrel removal.

Technical Specs

Caliber: 6.5mm Bergmann

Bullet Weight: 64.8-81.7 grains

Muzzle Velocity: 710-775 fps (216-236 m/s)

Clip Capacity: 5 rounds

Overall Length: 10.0 in (255mm)

Barrel Length: 4.5 in (114mm)

Weight: 31.2 oz (885g)

Action: Straight blowback

References

Ezell, Edward C. Handguns of the World. Stackpole Books, New York, 1981.

Reinhart, Christian and am Rhyn, Michael. Fastfeuerwaffen II.

Wilson, R.K. Textbook of Automatic Pistols. Samworth, 1934 (reprinted by Wolfe Publishing, Prescott AZ, 1990).

Photos

Now, how about some photos of different variances of the No.3? These pictures all come from the James Julia auction house, which sold a significant number of Bergmann pistols (from the Schroeder and Sturgess collections) in a September 2013 auction.

First, an early but otherwise typical No.3, with factory case:

Early (s/n 414) no-extractor No.3 in factory presentation case.Note barrel retaining lug (early system) and “278” marking.



Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 262 - You put WHAT in the oven

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking powders and drying brass.

  1. Jake Boostin Awd shared his first post in RLPGFB: .308 130gr ttsx.

    What would be a better powder to try next?

    Imr 8202 xbr H4895 or TAC.

    With 110ttsx and tac I get great velocity, just not all the accuracy I want and the sd just isnt there. 3325-3480 fps 22" 1/10 no pressure issues.

    I am thinking H4895 as it is one mark slower on the burn rate chart that will help with with slightly heavier bullet.

    I have used H335 with 125gr sst 3000fps great accuracy but pressure signs early. Opinions, tips or advice?

  2. Mike Smitty Smith shared his first post in RLPGFB: Thank you for the add.

    I’m new to reloading and am curious if anyone has used Hodgdon tight group for .357 loading a 158 cast semi wadcutter. The reason I ask is that is all I’ve found locally.

  3. Daniel Stevenson posted in TRRFB: Question about the purpose of lemishine when wet tumbling, Is it simply a surfactant, or are you intentionally using something acidic in order to change the PH balance of the water?

  4. Leon Boczkowski shared his first post in TRRFB: Can I dry cartridges in the oven after the ultrasonic cleaner to dry them quicker. If so, what temperature and for how long approx?






Cartridge corner: 348 Winchester



.348 Winchester

History

The Winchester Model 1886 lever action rifle designed by John Moses Browning is considered by many to be one of the finest lever action rifles ever built. Designed for the largest black powder cartridges of its era, examples of some of its nine chamberings include the .45-70, .40-90, .50-100 and .50-110. In 1902  the M1886 was chambered for its first smokeless powdered cartridge in a bore size of Winchester invention, the .33 Winchester Centrefire (WCF). This cartridge fired a 200 grain .338” bullet at 2200fps and was designed for large North American game. Although the .33 WCF quickly gained popularity, interest in the cartridge gradually waned. The .33 WCF could not do anything that could not be done with the cheap surplus military .30-06 rifle firing heavy bullets and when the depression hit during the 1930’s, many U.S hunters resorted to using the .30-06 over sporting arms. Low sales of the M1886 rifle along with the high cost of producing such a finely machined and fitted firearm forced Winchester to discontinue this model in 1935.

 

In order to salvage sales Winchester engineers redesigned the M1886 cutting production costs while a new more powerful cartridge was designed to re interest lever action fans. In 1936 Winchester released its new lever action rifle, the Model 71.  Although having been through a cost cutting exercise the action of the M71 was beefed up for the new potent cartridge, the .348 Winchester. As a further boon, the butt stock of the 71 featured a pistol grip and a straighter stock (less drop at the heel) to help tame recoil.

 

Case capacity of the .348 Winchester is impressive. The cartridge design was based on the .50-110 cartridge case with a case rim diameter of .610” and a case length of 2.255”. Rather than continuing to use the tooling for the .33 bore, the new cartridge was designed to fire a .348” bullet, a completely new caliber. Initial loads featured a 150 grain bullet at an advertised 2920fps and a 200 grain bullet at 2535fps. Later, a 250 grain load was introduced at an advertised velocity of 2350fps.

 

The .348 had ample power and suitable projectiles for hunting a vast range of game body weights out to moderate ranges and although it gained a following the .348 suffered the same fate as its predecessor. Reasons for the lack of continued interest in this cartridge were most likely due to the odd bore size, unique to both the cartridge and Winchester rifle. Again production costs could not be justified with low sales and during the 1950’s the Model 71 and its .348 chambering were discontinued. Factory ammunition which at one time was loaded by both Winchester and Remington was reduced to just one load from each manufacturer but even these have disappeared. Winchester’s last load consisted of the 200 grain Winchester SilverTip at an advertised velocity of 2520fps for a realistic 2450fps in 24” barreled M71 rifles. 

 

The .348 is currently caught between two worlds. On the one hand, original rifles are highly prized and fetch high prices on the second hand gun market. Winchester also make limited runs of model 71 rifles. The case design is highly prized, firstly in its own right as the .348 Winchester but also as a source of brass for the.450 and .500 Alaskan wildcat cartridges designed by Harold Johnson (1950’s). Both the .450 (.458”) and .50 (.510”) cartridges boast velocities of around 2100fps with 400 grain bullets and were designed to be used in the Model 71 rifle. Other wildcats based on the .348 and 71 rifle include (but are not limited to) the .30-348, the .348 Ackley Improved and the .358-348. There is therefore a limited but continued demand for both model 71 rifles along with either brass or loaded ammunition.

 

 

Performance

When we shift from the .30 caliber to the .338 bore the changes in terminal performance tend to be very subtle. The .348 takes a further step up in bullet diameter in comparison to the .30 calibers and it is here that we begin to see a glimmer of changes in bullet behavior and terminal performance. These changes are still subtle and are effected by bullet designs.

 

Now, rather than seeing a hydrostatic shock cut off point of around 2600fps on mid weight game, the increased frontal area has a meaningful effect and depending on game body weight resistance (being neither too lean or too heavy and depending on the type of bullet used), we begin to see greater nervous trauma leading to a rapid loss in consciousness at lower impact velocities approaching 2300fps. This translates into shorter dead runs. Please see Effective Game killing section for more information on hydrostatic shock and nervous trauma.

 

The .348 can be described as having a power level that sits roughly halfway between the .358 Winchester and the .35 Whelen. But again, bullet design has a major influence on the ability of this bore to render fast kills.

 

The .348 does its best work at close ranges. It produces a high level of trauma when loaded with 200 grain bullets at velocities of 2500fps which stay above the 2300fps mark for a short distance. Once this initial velocity is shed, performance becomes somewhat more mild. With fast expanding bullets, game may run but are just as likely to react in a drunken manner and not travel too far. At impact velocities below 2200fps, wounds become more narrow and game run longer distances.

 

With slow expanding bullets, the .348 can produce clean kills but lean game may run some distance before succumbing to blood loss. Performance of such loads can be fairly ho-hum.

 

When loaded with 250 grain bullets at 2300fps, the potential for nervous trauma causing an immediate loss of consciousness is less evident, however wounds remain somewhat broad on large bodied game down to 2200fps and then gradually narrow as the 1800fps mark is approached, after which, wounding potential falls off rapidly. This bullet weight generally carries too much momentum for fast killing of light or lean game and should be reserved for larger bodied animals which offer a good deal of body weight resistance for energy transfer.

 

The use of core bonded bullets in the .348 deserves careful consideration as these tend to work best at impact velocities above 2400fps. Having said this, the flat point bullet designs used in the .348 help (regain) terminal performance at lower impact velocities. The net result is that providing ranges are kept short and animals are of a relatively large or stout build, it is possible to obtain a mixture of good trauma (fast bleeding) and relatively deep penetration with core bonded bullets.

 

The .348 can tackle large bodied game but should not be considered a true heavy game (600kg / 1300lb) cartridge in the same manner as the .375 and larger bores.

 

As for the rifle, the model 71 is of sound and strong design, featuring immensely handsome lines. This rifle cannot however be fitted with a traditional scope sight. And while open sights are quite fine for bush work, one must understand that low light hunting under or into a bush canopy can at times completely obscure sights, making accurate shooting (especially dark colored animals) very difficult. Readers are encouraged to study Williams sight products along with Skinner sights. Please take care to study both aperture (peep) sights along with high visibility front sight options.

 

It is also important to understand that many of the old rifles are now quite worn. The actions may still be strong however the bores of many rifles have seen better days. Rust and the resulting pitting from wet weather hunting or damp storage conditions versus poor preservation regimes all take their toll on the bores of these old rifles.

 

The Model 71 is a tube loaded rifle and must be loaded with either flat point bullets or the rubber tipped Hornady FTX.  These bullets are no hindrance to the .348 and if anything these help increase terminal performance providing ranges are not pushed too far. The combination of a flat point bullet in a wide bore driven at high velocity can increase the versatility of a medium bore cartridge, enabling one load to achieve fast killing and consistent results on a wide range of game body weights.

 

 

 

Factory ammunition

Winchester’s now defunct 200 grain Silvertip was ideal for game weighing up to 320kg (720lb). The Silvertip produced some highly desirable results, the stout aluminum tip when driven back caused explosive expansion but could not be expected to hold together if large heavy round bone (ball joints) were encountered. On ordinary cross body shots, providing not too much muscle and bone was encountered, the Silvertip produced severe destruction to vital tissues. The frontal area of the Silvertip was usually wiped off on impact, allowing reasonably deep penetration however the 200 grain .348 bullet lacked a high enough SD to truly benefit from this action. At times and depending on the range (beyond 75 yards), game would not go down immediately however animals hit squarely would react in a drunken manner going down soon after.

 

It should be noted that all Winchester loads (150, 200 and 250 grain) were initially of the Silvertip type. Winchester all so produced Power-Point (soft point ) loads for a time however it was the Silvertip that produced the most spectacular results. Furthermore, a good number of hunters utilized the 250 grain Silvertip in the far reaches of Canada and Alaska for Moose hunting. The Silvertip could achieve desirable one shot kills but it must be understood that all energy was expended rapidly and that penetration at close ranges was somewhat limited in comparison to modern premium bullet designs.

 

Today the sole remaining loads available for the .348 Winchester are those loaded by Buffalo Bore and Grizzly. All are core bonded loads, expensive and hard to obtain. Comments on the use of core bonded bullets can be found within the performance section of this text.

 

 

Hand loading

Just as factory ammunition for the .348 is rare, hand loading components are also limited. Brass is still obtainable and with a number of wildcat cartridges based on the .348 case, supplies of Winchester brass should continue into the future. The .348 case gives good results with 200 to 250 grain bullets when loaded with H4350 / ADI 2209 burn rate powders, though faster powders (H4895 / Varget) can be useful with lighter bullets. The big .348 case takes hefty charges, driving 200 grain bullets at 2500fps with 60 grains H4350, 220 grain bullets at 2400fps with 57 grains H4350 and 250 grain bullets at around 2300fps with 55 grains H4350. Please note that these loads may be too dangerous for some rifles and should be reduced by 10% before working up. These notes are provided here purely due to the fact that load data is now difficult to obtain for the .348.

 

One powder of interest for the .348 is Hornady’s Superformance powder (not Leverevolution). Superformance is suited to this particular cartridge due to its slow burn rate and high bulk density which suits this case capacity quite well. For those who are serious fans of the .348 and are well grounded in hand loading including the ability to read pressure signs carefully, Superformance powder will allow the hand loader to develop much faster loads than those quoted here.

 

Only four projectiles are readily available for reloading the .348 at this time of writing, the 200 grain Hornady Interlock, the 200 grain Hornady Flex Tip (FTX), the 220 grain Barnes Original and the 250 grain Barnes Original.  

 

The 200 grain Hornady is a soft bullet but not explosive unless hitting heavy bone. Performance can best be described as adequate. The Interlock sheds a great deal of weight as it penetrates, but does so in a gradual manner and is not a spectacular killer. This bullet produces clean but generally delayed kills on light framed game if the CNS is not struck directly. The Interlock loses a great deal of weight when striking the major bones of lighter animals, even those weighing less than 80kg (176lb) and can be prone to bullet blow up on heavy bone. In summary, this is a bullet that can be too tough (or retain too much momentum) for fast kills on light game yet can be too soft for heavy game. Such are the limitations when a bullet designer tries to cover the needs of a wide range of hunters with just the one bullet design.

 

The 200 grain Hornady FTX has breathed new life into the .348. This projectile offers explosive performance similar to the old Silver Tip. Wounds are noticeably wider than other offerings resulting in faster killing. By the same token, penetration is limited as can be expected with this type of performance. This bullet can tackle a wide range of game with Elk as an upper body weight limit. It can be used on heavier game such as Moose but the hunter must have realistic expectations. This is not a deep penetrating bullet. These considerations aside, the FTX is a truly well designed bullet, an SST for the levers. With one load, the hunter can tackle the leanest of deer through to relatively large bodied animals with great consistency.

 

For those who are not familiar with Barnes Original bullets, these are a more basic conventional bullet design. Performance is similar (to paint a picture) to that of the Sierra Prohunter or Norma conventional soft points in that the jacket is fairly heavy while the core is typically soft. The Barnes bullets do not produce immediate ‘explosive’ performance and perform much like the Interlock but with somewhat greater jacket and core integrity. These are not spectacular killers, but they do get the job done in a reliable manner. The heavy 250 grain Barnes bullet has from time to time been used to take Moose in Canada and Alaska. Under these circumstances the mild impact velocities help the Barnes Original to obtain adequate wounding and relatively deep penetration.

 

Beyond these bullets there are now few options for .348 users apart from those offered by custom or semi-custom bullet makers. For those who have no access to the FTX and are wanting the same rapid energy transfer, it is possible to hollow point the Interlock and Barnes projectiles, however the hollow points need to be wide and relatively shallow. The same process can be utilized to make heavy 250 grain bullets slightly more responsive. It would be nice to see at least one bullet maker offer a more explosive heavy weight bullet for the .348. One has to remember that heavy bullets arrive at very low impact velocities when fired from the .348 which can aid penetration - but at the expense of wounding. In contrast to this, a fast expanding but heavy .348 bullet can allow the hunter to have his cake and eat it, increasing over all versatility.

 

Please note that if bullets cannot be found for your rifle it is possible to swage down .358 caliber bullets such as the Hornady 250 grain round nose (an excellent hunting bullet design). This operation can be performed with a custom made swaging die (similar to a reloading die) which allows the .358” bullet to be pushed through the die and swaged down by .010”.

 

 

Closing comments

The .348 Winchester is certainly an interesting cartridge. Performance can range from mild or adequate to emphatic and spectacular depending on the type of bullet used. The .348 has the appeal of a classic muscle car but at the same time, it has a practical element to it, the potential to be a solid working hack for the bush hunter.

 

It is doubtful that the .348 will ever make a huge come back with the .358 bore well established and producing excellent performance in its own right. Furthermore, Hornady and Marlin have in recent years combined to corner the lever action market with new hot chamberings. Nevertheless, the .348 will continue on, loved dearly by those who use it. And with the rifle and brass both in demand for the creation of potent wildcats, the model 71 .348 caliber rifle will not be forgotten.

 

 

Suggested loads: .348 Winchester

Barrel length: 24”

No

ID

 

Sectional density

Ballistic coefficient

Observed  MV Fps

ME

Ft-lb’s

1

HL

200gr Interlock

.236

.246

2500

2775

2

HL

200gr FTX

.236

.320

2500

2775

3

HL

250gr Barnes Original

.295

.327

2300

2939

 

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths 

 

 

 

 

1

50

100

150

175

200

225

250

 

 

1.4

1.6

0

-1.6

-3.8

-6.6

-10.1

 

2

50

100

150

175

200

225

250

 

 

1.3

1.5

0

-1.5

-3.5

-6

-9.1

 

3

50

100

150

175

200

225

250

 

 

1.6

1.8

0

-1.8

-4.1

-7.2

-10.9

 

 

No

At yards

10mphXwind

Velocity

Ft-lb’s

1

200

6.9

1849

1519

2

200

5.1

1990

1758

3

200

5.7

1825

1848

 

Please take careful note of impact velocities at 200 yards. Below 1800fps, most projectiles begin to struggle with expansion.

 

 

.348 Winchester

Imperial

Metric 

A

.610

15.49

B

.553

14.04

C

19 Deg

 

D

.485

12.32

E

.376

9.55

F

1.650

41.91

G

.605

15.37

H

2.255

57.28

Max Case

2.255

57.3

Trim length

2.245

57

 

 Link to 348 Winchester Data page


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 261 - What we load

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking what they load, and humidity.

  1. Don posted in RLPGMW Maybe it's just my opinion, but I really think you did not do the 7X64 Brenneke any justice in the latest Cartridge Corner.

  2. I've been listening for a couple of months now and really enjoy the podcast. I also contacted you about my 10.5" AR15 that shoots well at 500 yards. I was using some factory 55gr 223 rounds as I had run out of my hand loads that day.  Any way. I just finished building my 6.5 Creedmoor Stag 10 with a 19" barrel 1/8 twist. I didn't even buy factory ammo for it and just got some new cases (50 Hornady and 50 Federal) and some 100gr Hornady ELD Match bullets. I already had the primers and powder so why buy factory. Now that I've put a 100 rounds through it and got it generally sighted in for 500 I'm wondering where to go to next. There are so many different bullets from each maker and testing them all will take forever. Normally I mostly do target shooting but I will also use this gun for hunting deer this season. So with all of that. So for the summer I just want to try and do some long range target shooting to get better at it where should I start? Should I pick the bullets with the highest BC? Do I look for a bullet that has the best speed? I'm not new to shooting but I've never really tried to do much in the way of long range precision shooting. Thanks for your advice. Stephen

  3. Paul Nelson posted in RLPGFB:  What do you shoot in rifle calibers?

    Me 223/556, 308, 6mm Remington, 22 Hornet, 22-250, 30 06, 280, 7 mm Remington mag 243 Winchester, 25 06, and 300 Win mag.

    That is what I shoot in order of most to least.

    New ones coming up are 6XC, and 6.5 x 47 once the barrels come in.

  4. Nathan Muller posted in RLPGFB:  Question for the group-

    I live in a high humidity environment, Houston TX. We’re currently remodeling our house- and I’ve been told that I’m good to go to do whatever I want with the garage- it’s my space.

    That being said- I’m concerned about storing powder and primers out there. Is that a justifiable concern? Should I store them inside?

  5. Rodney Mullannix posted in RLPGFB: I am loading for my 6.5 creedmoor. I’m using 130 free ELD bullets and I’m 4451. My best group is at a charge of 43.5 grains.

    The Hornady and Hodgdon data said that is over the max charge but Sierra data says 43.7 is. I’m using Norma brass and have not had any sticky bolt or flattened primers. Am I ok with this load?



American Insurgent Audio Book






Cartridge corner: 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 260 - hey, We actually matched the cartridge to the show number

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking 350 Legend and used equipment prices.

  1. AR15 10"Just listening to your latest episode and you were talking about your 10" barrel being pretty accurate at 25 yards. I also built out a 10.5" AR15 and used it in a service rifle competition this past January. It was damn cold out (-20c) with a cross wind of about 15 kph (10 mph). I was using a 3-18x40 Bushnell AR223 scope. With this setup I was able to put 5 rounds in to an 18 inch group at 500 yards. I know 18" is a pretty big area but if there wasn't the gusting crosswind I could have done better. I was using a 69gr Hornady BTHP with 25 gr of CFE223. I haven't chronograph these rounds but I suspect they are leaving the barrel at about 2500 fps. Basically these SBR AR15's are pretty darn good and like you say are a ton of fun on the short range. Stephen A

  2. Working on a 350 legend build and the muzzle brake I’ve selected has a bore of .34375 I understand that won’t work but what would be a safe overbore number for this caliber. Jeremy T 

    1. SAAMI on 350 Legend

    2. Eagle Eye Shooting 350 legend warnings

  3. Hey guys, I have inherited some Weatherby brass varying from 257-460. Some of which are in original boxes. I would like to sell/trade them for reloading equipment I can use. I have no idea where to start of what the value of what I have is worth. Any help pointing me in the rite direction would be great!  Thank you Tyler

  4. While shopping the Used Reloading Equipment category on EBay I was amazed and a little pissed off! What in the world are these people thinking? They have opening bids on USED dies and presses which are equal to the current retail price. In some case folks have purchased items at a higher cost than new retail prices. WTH? Are used dies worth more than new ones? I don't think so. Note* I am semi-retired and have nothing else to be angry about....hahahahahahaha Randy





Cartridge corner: 260 Remington 



When Sweden upgraded their military service rifle, thousands of surplus 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser rifles were exported and sold abroad. The cartridge itself held almost a mystical appeal, an extremely long, sleek, deadly looking projectile housed in what looked like a cartridge case of reasonable powder capacity.


Although U.S hunters had access to the Swedish Mauser, ammunition was for a long time, hard to obtain. When American factory produced ammunition did finally become available, it was downloaded to such an extent that performance was abysmal. This was mostly based on a distrust of Swedish metallurgy.  Regardless, U.S hand loaders were, like other hand loaders around the world, loading the 6.5x55 to full power. Several hunters praised the performance of the 6.5x55 in magazine articles which added to its allure.


When U.S, Australian and NZ competitive target shooters experimented with the 6.5mm bore, the results were outstanding. The 6.5 was capable of producing low bullet drop and low wind drift with minimal recoil. Accuracy with the most basic of 140 grain projectiles was excellent. That said, a number of competitive shooters were (and still are) great fans of the .308 Winchester case design. As it is a common practice for serious competitive shooters to utilize wildcat cartridge designs to obtain optimum performance, necking down the .308 case to 6.5mm was a predictable and natural progression. 


The 6.5-08 wildcat produced identical velocities to the 6.5x55. Nevertheless, the benefits of the wildcat chambering included greater control of chamber tolerances during reamer design along with readily available inexpensive U.S brass. The wildcat cartridge could also be housed in magazine fed short action rifles although this was not a main concern.


By the end of the 1980’s, a small number of competitive shooters were enjoying the benefits of the 6.5-08 wildcat loaded with the 139 grain Lapua Scenar projectile. By the mid 1990’s, the wildcat had become well known in competition circles. The wildcat chambering was also beginning to appear in hunting rifles. As a typical example, the 6.5-08 was an ideal step up when re-barreling worn out .243 Winchester caliber rifles. The wildcat was well suited to the short action, utilized heavier and deeper penetrating projectiles than the .243 but with a similar flat trajectory along with mild recoil.


In 1996, Arthur B Alphin, director of A-Square Cartridges (USA) applied to have the 6.5-08 wildcat standardized by SAAMI as the 6.5-08 A-Square. A-Square was a member of SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute) but for unknown reasons, the processing of Alphin’s application was very slow. In 1997, Remington (also a SAAMI member) made a similar application to standardize the 6.5-08 as the .260 Remington. Shortly thereafter, the Remington design was accepted and the cartridge dimensions standardized. Although A-Square lost naming rights to the wildcat, the odd situation was not turned into a major drama. Like other SAAMI members, A-Square continued to focus on the primary goal of safe design of firearms and cartridges.


Remington released the .260 Remington in 1997 as a hunting cartridge. The .260 was initially chambered in the Model 7 rifle followed by the M700. The 1997 marketing campaign promoted the .260 as being a compact short action cartridge producing less recoil than the .270 Winchester yet higher down range energies. The stainless synthetic Model 7 rifle utilized a short, ultra light weight action coupled with a 20” light weight barrel. Regardless of the 6.5-08’s popularity for target shooting, the .260 was not offered in the Remington 40-X target rifle, nor was any match grade factory ammunition introduced.


While the .260 achieved limited success, it did not deliver optimum performance. Remington factory ammunition for the .260 produced low velocities in the Model 7 rifle and for factory ammunition users, killing performance was somewhat mediocre. In fact, performance of the factory combination was not unlike the already anemic loads available for the 6.5x55.


For hand loaders, the .260 was not able to give any more performance than was already available from the 6.5x55. Nevertheless, for some hunters the light weight Remington rifles, both the M7 and M700, offered several desirable features in comparison to sporterized ex-military Swedish rifles. It is this group of hunters that utilized the .260 the most. 


Currently, the .260 has a small following among hunters world wide. In competitive shooting, both the 6.5-08 and .260 have to a large extent, been superseded by the 6.5-08 Ackley Improved or .260 Ackley Improved. Although both the 6.5-08 and .260 are the same cartridge, it is important that readers be aware of the fact that in target rifles, there are several slight variations in chamber dimensions according to individual customer specifications. A target rifle marked .260 Remington “should” be able to safely fire Remington factory ammunition or hand loads using 7mm-08 brass while rifles marked 6.5-08 may on occasion, have minimum dimension chambers which can potentially produce dangerous pressures using ordinary components.

 

 

Performance

The .260 Remington has a slightly shorter but slightly wider case than the Swedish 55mm case. Ultimately, the .260 and 6.5x55 produce the same velocities.


It has been said that the 6.5x55 can produce better velocities than the .260 when hand loaded with 160 grain bullets however this is not necessarily true, nor is it a useful statement. Both the Swede and .260 produce low velocities with 160 grain bullets and while the premise of a 160 grain 6.5mm projectile may sound appealing, the blunt, low BC designs of the available 160 grain 6.5mm projectiles make this bullet weight the least versatile - in the 6.5mm bore anyway.


The .260 Remington has given hunters access to the 6.5mm bore in an over the counter manner. Factory sporting rifles and theoretically suitable ammunition are readily available. The Remington rifles have many desirable features. The M700 rifle in stainless synthetic is able to withstand far greater long term abuse and neglect than the sporterized Swede. The M700 can be built lighter than the Swede although the extreme version, the Model 7, can suffer accuracy problems due to the exceptionally light weight barrel.

For factory ammunition users, this cartridge does not quite deliver optimum performance with Remington Factory ammunition. Killing power is far closer to the .30-30 rather than the .270 Winchester that is often used as a comparison. For hand loaders, performance can be enhanced considerably. That said, as previously stated in the 6.5x55 performance text, hunters must take care not to become over confident in the abilities of the 6.5mm bore.


The mild 6.5’s give fast killing at close ranges but definitely lose the ability to produce wide wounding at ranges beyond 200-250 yards when using hunting projectiles. Light 120 grain bullets hand loaded to between 2950fps produce fast kills on lighter medium game but most 120 grain bullets produce shallow penetration. The exception to this is the 120 grain Barnes TSX.


130 grain bullets hand loaded to 2850fps have neither the high SD’s and BC’s of the 140 grain bullet weight or high velocity achieved from hand loaded 120 grain bullets. Performance is identical to budget .270 Winchester factory ammunition at 2900fps.


The 140 grain bullet hand loaded to between 2750 and 2800fps is the most versatile bullet weight for the .260 offering the best balance of wounding versus penetration. That said, kills beyond 200 yards can be slow while conventional projectiles, regardless of SD, often fail to produce deep penetration. 


At ranges beyond 200 yards, the hunter should aim to break the foreleg bones of game. Both rear lung and neck shots often result in very slow killing at extended ranges.


Performance of the .260 can be increased considerably by creating loads for specific applications. Both the .260 and Swede give excellent results when used this way. The negative aspect of this method is that versatility can be lost, especially when large variations in game body weights might be encountered at varying ranges. As an example, the .260 loaded with the 140 grain A-max at 2800fps produces extremely wide wounding, fast killing and adequate penetration on medium game at ranges between 0 and 400 yards, producing optimum performance between 200 and 400 yards. This is an excellent load for lighter bodied deer species. However the 140 grain A-max is not reliable on tougher animals such as mature wild boar at close to moderate ranges, hence this load suits a specific application.


Factory Ammunition

Current factory loads from Remington's 24" test barrels feature the 120 grain Accutip boat tail at 2890fps, the 140 grain Core-Lokt at 2750fps and the 140 grain bonded core Core-Lokt ultra at 2750fps.  Unfortunately in the short barrel of the Model 7 these loads lose at least 140fps giving the 120 grain bullet 2750fps and the 140 grain bullets 2600fps. In the M700 rifle variants with 22” barrels, the 120 grain bullet gives around 2800fps and the 140 grain loads around 2670fps.


The Accutip is extremely similar in design and performance to the Hornady SST. This load is best suited to light bodied game as penetration is somewhat limited. The Accutip has the potential to produce flat trajectory and excellent longer range performance but is handicapped by the low muzzle velocities.


The 140 grain Core-Lokt is perhaps the best conventional 6.5 projectile on the market and out penetrates any other, giving excellent expansion and wide wounding. Again, performance is limited by low velocities which limit the wounding potential of this otherwise useful game bullet. The Core-Lokt Ultra is an excellent projectile but because of low muzzle velocities, creates a much narrower wound than conventional projectiles. Surprisingly, at these velocities, core bonded projectiles do not out penetrate conventional projectiles by a noticeable margin. The main benefit of the Ultra is its extra insurance on heavy bone with no risk of bullet blow up. When used on light to medium sized deer, the Ultra can be slower killing than the traditional Core-Lokt in this combination.


A last note on Remington Factory ammunition - in both the .260 and 7mm-08, low velocities have in the past led to poor case to chamber obturation (sealing) in some rifles. The small amount of gas leakage combined with low pressures can allow powder fouling to build up in the case neck area of the rifle chamber. The expansion of the case neck compounds the problem as it becomes a ram, compacting powder fouling against the neck area of the rifle chamber. In these situations, a once fired Remington case will be tight at the case mouth and will not slip easily over a projectile from an unfired factory round. When powder builds up in this manner, pressures become high and accuracy extremely poor. Those who use Remington factory ammunition at this time of writing are advised to carefully monitor chamber fouling and use suitable cleaning methods, preferably, a .277 caliber bristle brush and solvent rotated about the chamber.

 

 

Hand Loading

Like most cartridges based on the .308 Winchester case, the .260 is relatively straight forwards to hand load, giving predictable results. Brass for the .260 is readily available but can also be quite easily formed from either .243 or 7mm-08 brass. The parent .308 brass is suitable for necking down to .260 however the extra thickness of the .308 case neck needs to be removed to avoid potentially dangerous pressure conditions.

 

The .260 Remington produces optimum results with medium slow burning powders in the 4350 range.  Longer barreled (24-32”) custom rifles obtain excellent results with H4831sc. From the original Model 7 rifle, the .260 is able to produce 2900fps with 120 grain bullets and 2700fps with 140 grain bullets. That said, some Model 7 rifles have too light a contour barrel to give optimum accuracy with high pressure loads.

 

One factor that must be taken into consideration when reloading for short barreled rifles is that it is very common for individuals to use working loads that are higher in pressure than SAAMI recommendations. In some instances, hand loaders will sacrifice long case life for optimum velocities. Whether this practice is right or wrong is irrelevant; the fact is that this is a common practice with short barreled rifles in the calibers .243, .260, 7mm-08 and especially the .308 tactical rifles. Most modern rifles will take this abuse but it goes without saying that maximum loads developed for one rifle are often far from suitable for another rifle. 

 

In longer 22” barreled rifles, the .260 will comfortably produce 2950fps with 120 grain bullets, 2850fps with 129/130 grain bullets and 2750fps with 140 grain bullets. Some rifles will produce another 50fps with careful experimentation which, as always, should be done in conjunction with a chronograph along with attention to pressure signs. In 24” barrels, 120 grain bullets can be driven at 3000fps with relatively mild pressures with 140 grain bullets producing 2800fps and mild pressures, particularly when using slow burning H4831sc.

 

Because the .260 essentially duplicates the Swede, bullet performance is discussed within that text.


 

Closing Comments

As previously mentioned, the .260 Ackley Improved has become a very popular cartridge for both competitive target shooting and also among intermediate long range hunters. The improved case does not necessarily create higher velocity potential in this already highly effective case design however the sharp 40 degree shoulder angle minimizes trimming operations, maximizes case life and with excellent head spacing, has high accuracy potential. The slight change in case shape can also create more consistent burning characteristics when using slow burning powders.

 

For target shooters, the greatest velocity gains from the AI are obtained through the use of a long barrel. For long range hunters using shorter 24-26” barrels, as is often the situation with hunters using improved cartridges, it is common practice to work at maximum pressures that are only slightly below the point at which undesirable case deformation occurs. In either situation, velocities for the AI tend to duplicate the 6.5-06 with 140 grain bullets achieving 2950fps.

 

Suggested loads: .260 Remington

Barrel length: 20”

No

ID

 

Sectional Density

Ballistic Coefficient

Observed  MV Fps

ME

Ft-lb’s

1

FL

Rem 140gr Core-Lokt

.287

.435

2600

2101

 

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Yards

100

125

227

264

300

325

350

 

 

Bt. path

+3

+3.25

0

-3

-6.9

-10.3

-14.2

 

 

No

At yards

10mphXwind

Velocity

Ft-lb’s

1

300

7.6

2057

1315


 

Note: See 6.5x55 tables for suggested hand loads.

 

 

 

Imperial

Metric 

A

.467

11.86

B

.468

11.88

C

20deg

 

D

.452

11.48

E

.297

7.54

F

1.562

39.67

G

.245

6.22

H

2.035

51.6

Max Case

2.035

51.6

Trim length

2.025

51.43


Discuss this article or ask a question on the forum here


Copyright © 2007-2017 Terminal Ballistics Research, Ballisticstudies.com



Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 259 - basic hunting load question

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about a couple hunting loads.

  1. Just settled on a Glock 40 10mm pistol for handgun hunting. Since I reload most all of my needed ammunition, I seem to be at a loss for hunting powerloads as compared to Underwood and Buffalo bore. I've been reloading most all of my pistol/rifle ammo due to lots of published information but 10mm seems to be limited in recommendations....... Scott M.

  2. Big fan and Patreon of the podcast and FRN. Really enjoy all your content and the banter. I appreciate your attention to detail and accuracy of information. For context, before I get to my question, I have about a decade of reloading experience, loading common calibers like 45 ACP and 5.56 on a Dillon 650 and handloading niche calibers like 5.7x28, 458 SOCOM, and 45 Raptor on a single stage.  I just bought and am breaking in a Q Fix bolt action in 308. 16 inch barrel, 1:10 twist, and I run a SilencerCo Omega 30 on it. I want to take this hunting this fall, Elk. So, I am looking to work up a hunting load for the rifle. What I am looking for is a bullet recommendations to try out, and do ladder loads with. I was thinking of something in the 168-175 grain area, and I don't plan on taking any shots past 400 or 500 yards.  My first thought was the Barnes TTX and Varget, but happy to take any suggestions. I want to try out a few things regardless. I have chrono'd some factory Federal 175 grain match ammo, getting velocities about 200-300 fps slower than on the box. Makes sense with the barrel length. Of note, I'm putting rounds on top of each other at 100 yards, so it shoots fine. Additionally, figure that I am taking shots at 5000-7000 feet elevation.  Any starting suggestions would be much appreciated. Nick M





Cartridge corner: No cartridge corner this week


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 258 - forming brass from other brass

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering questions.

  1. Conversation about the best twist rate for a standardized bullet weight: That does make me wonder if you had a custom 1:10.25 barrel made, how much better would it do than a regular 1:9 twist? Are we talking 1 MOA difference or 0.1 MOA?

    https://www.vcalc.com/wiki/AndrewBudd/Greenhill+Formula+for+Optimal+Rifling+Twist+Rate

  2. Jordan Baker posted in TRRFB: Needing some advice/help with forming brass. Recently picked up a Arisaka Type 99 to add to my military collection. Read a few articles on forming 7.7 jap from 30-06.

    Trimmed down a case and applied RCBS lube to it and ran it thru a 7.7 jap die. Mouth sized fine. Shoulder got set back fine. But I can not get the entire case to feed into the die. I lack about 3/4 of an inch.

    Is there anything special I need to do to the die as far as adjusting goes or is there something else I’m missing? As now right now, the brass will not feed into the gun. Thanks a lot.

  3. Attention Chris Sharpe, hold off on the Annie Annealer, I just got an Annealeze, and let me anneal a few cases and we’ll do a review of it on an upcoming show?

  4. John Normoyle posted in TRR MeWe Group: Crazy question. I used to have an app that searched for the best deals on reloading components. For example, .223 cal 62 grain bullets. It would give a list of say 10 places. The cost per box, the cost per bullet and a link(?). For the life of me i cannot find it on my phone and a search of the play store (android device).

    Does anyone have any clue what i am going on about?

  5. Ryan Beasley post in TRR FB:  7.0gn of trailboss in a .44mag is weak! Should I go over the chart or switch powders?

  6. Brian Shepley posted in TRR FB: Thinking of starting to load shot shells. Thinking of taking up skeet shooting and thinking of saving some coin. In doing a search of the forum, I see Lee Loadall and Mec 600 Jr being pretty popular. Is there a better one?

    1. Lyman 5th Shotshell Reloading Manual






Cartridge corner: 


Reviews: Author: RSChapin

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Title: Excellent

Review: I’ve listened to them all. It’s hard to comprehend having so much material, but it’s there.



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 257 - Broken Balls

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking broken stems and tumbling.

  1. Ryan Degn posted in RLPG FB Unfortunately while trying to quickly de-prime a case I stuck a case in my die. In the process of removing the case I broke the expander ball of the stem. I have replacement stems and decapping pins. But I cannot find the carbide ball anywhere. Any help please. Hornady .223 die.

  2. Denny Rice posted in RLPGFB ---- Ok guys I want to pick your brains...again. I am looking at wet tumblers, its between the Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series or Extreme Tumblers Rebel 17...Which one and why? There is about a 70 dollar difference in the two machines. Thanks for the input.





Cartridge corner: .244/6mm Remington

History


In the early 1950’s, Remington engineers began research towards a 6mm cartridge suitable for varmints through to deer. Having settled on the .257 Roberts case as the base for their design, the project members focused on suitable bullet weights. After much testing, it was determined that in the Roberts case, optimum performance came from bullets weighing 75 grains for varmints up to a maximum of 90 grains for use on deer. A slow rifling pitch of 1:12 (one turn per twelve inches) was chosen to stabilize these bullet weights and in 1955 the .244 Remington was officially introduced. In the same year, Winchester introduced the .243 Winchester, utilizing 80 to 100 grain bullets and featuring a barrel twist rate of 1:9.


Both cartridges were designed for dual use on varmints through to deer however the shooting public assumed that because the Remington used lighter bullets, it must have been designed as a varmint cartridge first and foremost. On top of this, the long .244 cartridge was chambered in a short action not ideally suited to the 57mm case. With 100 grain bullets the .244 might lose powder capacity. The public was decided and .243 sales took off leaving the .244 in the dust.


In 1963 Remington attempted to regain ground by releasing .244 rifles with a new 1:9 twist to handle heavier bullets. The cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington and new ammunition was loaded giving the hunter the choice of either an 80gr bullet for varmints or a 100 grain bullet for deer. The changes had little effect on the market and the 6mm Remington has dwindled ever since. 


Remington has not produced 6mm Remington caliber rifles for several years and the 244/6mm Remington is today, somewhat of a classic cartridge. This cartridge is also occasionally adopted by hunters as a custom rifle chambering.


 

Performance

As previously stated in the .243 Winchester text, the greatest virtue of both the .243 and .244/6mm is that these cartridges offer adequate killing power for lighter medium game at a noise and recoil level that can help any hunter to shoot calmly and accurately. However, the 6mm bore is not nearly as forgiving as wider bore sizes and those who use the 6mm’s must explore both the strengths and limitations of this bore size along with a thorough understanding of game anatomy.


In comparison to the .243Win, factory loads for the .244/6mm Remington are slightly more powerful while hand loads increase this margin further. The .244/6mm has two levels of performance which can be generally divided into; factory rifles with 22” barrels versus custom long magazine rifles with 24” barrels.  The latter produce a noticeable increase in muzzle velocities with hand loads over both the .243Win and standard .244/6mmRem. 


As with several Remington cartridges, the .244/6mm was designed with generous freebore. This allows both factory and hand loads to be driven at high velocities with relatively low pressures. By adopting a custom rifle with a magazine length more suited to the long 57mm Roberts/Mauser case, the performance of the .244/6mm can be enhanced further.

 

.243 Winchester 22” bl 24”bl

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3130 3200

FL Federal 100gr SP 2890 2960

HL 85gr 3200 3270

HL 95gr 3050 3120

HL 100gr 3000 3070

.244/6mm Remington. Factory short magazine @ 2.83”/ 72mm

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3300 3370

HL 95gr 3100 3170

HL 100gr 3050 3120

.244/6mm Remington. Custom rifle, magazine 3.300”/84mm plus

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3350 3400

HL 95gr 3150 3200

HL 100gr 3100 3150

.240 Weatherby. 6mm-06 Improved

FL/HL 100gr SP 3260 3330

The table above shows comparisons between the .243 and .244/6mm in both 22 and 24” barrels. Also shown is the results of using a longer magazine custom rifle for the .244/6mm and the effects of hand loaded bullets, seated out long to increase powder capacity. Lastly, the .240 Weatherby, essentially a 6mm-06 Improved, is shown for further comparisons. Please bear in mind that there are no absolutes and that individual rifles will display variations in velocity. 


Long magazine custom rifles (especially on the mid length Mauser M98 action) have from time to time, been popular amongst 6mm bore fans as a basis for building high velocity optimum performance .244/6mm rifles. Fortunately, the chamber specifications and throat length as determined by Remington and standardized by SAAMI are perfectly balanced for full utilization of the 57mm case without any need for custom throating.


Readers must also bear in mind that any power increase of the .244/6mm over typical .243 hand load velocities (85gr bullet at 3200fps) poses an increase in recoil which may not be suitable for certain hunters. Along with this, driving a 100 grain 6mm projectile at 3150fps still does not make the .244/6mm Remington as effective and forgiving as cartridges in the power range of the 7mm08 when heavily muscled or heavily boned game are encountered. Instead, the high velocities of a fully optimized .244/6mm simply increase the range of the 6mm bore’s ability to produce fast kills on medium game.


The .243 produces its fastest kills inside 200 yards or at impact velocities above 2650fps. The standard .244/6mm increases this range by around 25 yards while a custom .244/6mm with 24” barrel produces its fastest kills inside 260 yards, a difference of only 60 yards over the somewhat smaller .243. That said, 60 yards is 60 yards and any increases in fast killing and wound trauma are definitely positive aspects of performance.


Between 300 and 400 yards, the .244/6mm produces a wide wound channel however game may show no sign of a hit and escape considerable distances. On stout game such as hogs, shot placement is very important, as regardless of the high velocity that the .244/6mm is capable of, mature boars can be very difficult to anchor.


 

Factory Ammunition

Remington now list only one load for the .244/6mm, the 100 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3100fps for a realistic 3030fps in 22” barrels. This load is not suitable for the twist rate of the original .244 rifles, suited only to rifles stamped 6mm Remington or custom rifles with the appropriate twist rate. This is a much more potent load than other entry level budget loads for the .243Win which generally achieve 2890fps from 22” barrels. The Core-Lokt has a low BC however most 6mm projectiles including the sleek Hornady SST suffer the same limitations. The 100 grain Core-Lokt is a punchy load, fast expanding with reliable controlled expansion and gives best performance (fastest killing) on medium game inside 175 yards. 

 

Federal have taken the .244/6mm Remington under their wing and produce several highly useful loads.  These include an 80 grain soft point at an advertised 3400fps for 3300fps in 22” barrels, the 85 grain Barnes TSX at 3350fps for 3270fps, a 100 grain soft point at 3100fps for 3030fps and lastly, the excellent 100 grain Partition at 3100fps for 3030fps in 22” barrels.

 

Both the 80 and 100 grain soft point bullets are low budget, entry level loads. The Federal Vital-Shok bullet (formally Hi-Shok) is not quite as well constructed as the Remington Core-Lokt regarding deep penetration however wounding is very much the same. The 80 grain bullet is of course designed for varminting but is also suitable for lightly built game weighing up to and around 40kg (90lb).

 

The 85 grain Barnes TSX produces the deepest penetration of all 6mm projectiles but wounding is slightly narrower, decreasing in performance at ranges beyond 200 yards. This bullet is best utilized on heavily muscled / boned medium game to help promote full expansion and violent wounding of which, the 85 grain TSX is fully capable of.  

 

The 100 grain Partition is a particularly useful load, especially at .244/6mm muzzle velocities. This bullet is fast expanding, ideal for lean animals but also relatively deep penetrating, ideal for stout animals. This is another load which does its best work inside 175 yards where velocity remains above 2650fps.


 

Hand Loading

Brass for the .244/6mm is still produced by Remington however 7x57 brass can also be re-sized and trimmed to suit. Suitable powders for light weight varmint projectiles include those in the IMR 4064 and Varget (ADI2208) range. For 80 to 105 grain projectiles, medium slow burning powders in the 4350 range work best. Long magazine custom rifles have the advantage of being able to utilize slow burning powders in the 4831 range without suffering powder compression. This powder is best suited to 100 and 105 grain bullets.


As already stated, the .244/6mm can be divided into two levels of performance; factory rifles versus custom long magazine rifles. Further categorization includes variations in barrel length and the limitations posed by the varying twist rates. The table given in the performance section of this text is an attempt to take many of these variables into account and to some extent, help explain why published data for the .244/6mm Remington also varies considerably.


The .244/6mm Remington produces similar performance with component projectiles to its cousin the .243 Winchester. To this end and to avoid repetition, projectile performance is discussed in great detail within that text.


One separate mention must go to the 105 grain Hornady A-Max. In rifles of suitable twist rate and barrel length, this longster can be driven at 3100fps. The BC of the A-Max is a huge .5, far greater than other .243 projectiles. Expansion on game is violent, velocity and energy retention down range are high, along with low wind drift. For those wanting a lighter medium game load specifically for open country hunting / extended ranges, the A-Max is an excellent projectile with superior wounding to competitive brands at the 300 yard mark and beyond. Please bear in mind however, this projectile was not designed as a hunting bullet and cannot be expected to produce deep penetration on stout bodied game.


 

Closing Comments

The .244/6mm Remington is becoming increasingly rare as time passes but has managed to retain a small fan base. Like the .243, this cartridge has both great strengths and considerable weaknesses. The key, is learning how to minimize the latter and optimize the former. Game anatomy, game killing, accuracy, trajectory and wind drift are all factors that 6mm users need to learn inside and out. Of course - the same should apply to all hunters regardless of whether they use a higher powered cartridge. Perhaps the weaknesses of the 6mm’s are in fact their greatest strengths if viewed as a learning tool.

 

Suggested loads: 6mm/.244 Remington Barrel length: 22

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

2 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

3 FL Fed 85gr Barnes TSX .206 .333 3270 2018

4 FL Fed 100gr SP. .242 .355 3030 2038

5 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3300 2055

6 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3100 2027

7 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3050 2065

8 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3400 2181

9 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3200 2160

10 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3150 2203

11 HL 105gr A-Max .254 .500 3100 2240  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths  

1 Yards 100 225 300 325 350  

  Bt. path +2 0 -5.4 -8 -11  

2 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

3 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

4 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

5 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

6 Yards 100 150 280 320 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -6 -9 -12.5  

7 Yards 100 150 275 315 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -6.5 -9.5 -13  

8 Yards 100 150 308 350 375 400 425  

  Bt. path +3 +4 0 -3 -5.5 -8.5 -12.7  

9 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -5 -7.6 -10.7  

10 Yards 100 150 288 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5 -7.8 -10.9  

11 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path + 3.8 0 -3 4.6 7.2 10    

 

 

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2306 1181

2 300 7.7 2306 1181

3 300 7.4 2460 1142

4 300 7.7 2308 1183

5 300 7.8 2450 1133

6 300 7.8 2369 1184

7 300 6.9 2378 1255

8 300 7.5 2531 1209

9 300 7.1 2453 1270

10 300 6.6 2463 1347

11 300 5 2569 1539 Note: Loads 8,9,10,11 for custom rifles with 24” barrels.


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 256 - Taking out the crimps

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Rusten Bullard posted in RLPG Gentlemen. Today was a ground breaking day. I’ve been catching brass for some time now. Collecting equipment. Painting the room. Drawing the plans for the bench. Today I sorted brass. Today I tumbled my first brass!.

    I’m really excited about the endeavor.

    If you could indulge me please. What percentage of you do the majority of your reloading sitting on a stool vs standing at your bench? I’m trying to establish an appropriate height for my bench. Your bench height references would be helpful as well. I’m 6’ tall.

  2. Tom Pedersen posted in RLPG : Removing primer crimps is the worst. I have an RCBS swager and a Lyman reamer.

    Usually I Chuck up the reamer in a drill and run them through cause it's faster than swaging.

    Anyone have tips/methods that make this suck less?




Cartridge corner: 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 255 - #FWARMS

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about dies, scales and a giveaway.

  1. Ryan Degn posted in RLPG FB Unfortunately while tryin to quickly de-prime a case I stuck a case in my die. In the process of removing the case I broke the expander ball of the stem. I have replacement stems and decapping pins. But I cannot find the carbide ball anywhere. Any help please. Hornady .223 die.

  2. Denny Rice posted in RLPGFB ---- Ok guys I want to pick your brains...again. I am looking at wet tumblers, its between the Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series or Extreme Tumblers Rebel 17...Which one and why? There is about a 70 dollar difference in the two machines. Thanks for the input.

  3. J Andrew Burnett posted in RLPG FB ---- I’m a precision rifle handloader and to that end I take my details very seriously. I have always used a balance beam scale which I’ve basically been very happy with. After playing around with an RCBS Chargemaster I found it lacking in the consistency department so I have continued to go with the balance beam. Now the question, has any ever seen a “precision” balance beam scale with very thin, precise hash marks? I ask because the marks on mine are thicker than I’d like to really tune the consistency in. Thanks for the help and the show. Love what you guys do.





Cartridge corner: .244/6mm Remington

History


In the early 1950’s, Remington engineers began research towards a 6mm cartridge suitable for varmints through to deer. Having settled on the .257 Roberts case as the base for their design, the project members focused on suitable bullet weights. After much testing, it was determined that in the Roberts case, optimum performance came from bullets weighing 75 grains for varmints up to a maximum of 90 grains for use on deer. A slow rifling pitch of 1:12 (one turn per twelve inches) was chosen to stabilize these bullet weights and in 1955 the .244 Remington was officially introduced. In the same year, Winchester introduced the .243 Winchester, utilizing 80 to 100 grain bullets and featuring a barrel twist rate of 1:9.


Both cartridges were designed for dual use on varmints through to deer however the shooting public assumed that because the Remington used lighter bullets, it must have been designed as a varmint cartridge first and foremost. On top of this, the long .244 cartridge was chambered in a short action not ideally suited to the 57mm case. With 100 grain bullets the .244 might lose powder capacity. The public was decided and .243 sales took off leaving the .244 in the dust.


In 1963 Remington attempted to regain ground by releasing .244 rifles with a new 1:9 twist to handle heavier bullets. The cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington and new ammunition was loaded giving the hunter the choice of either an 80gr bullet for varmints or a 100 grain bullet for deer. The changes had little effect on the market and the 6mm Remington has dwindled ever since. 


Remington has not produced 6mm Remington caliber rifles for several years and the 244/6mm Remington is today, somewhat of a classic cartridge. This cartridge is also occasionally adopted by hunters as a custom rifle chambering.


 

Performance

As previously stated in the .243 Winchester text, the greatest virtue of both the .243 and .244/6mm is that these cartridges offer adequate killing power for lighter medium game at a noise and recoil level that can help any hunter to shoot calmly and accurately. However, the 6mm bore is not nearly as forgiving as wider bore sizes and those who use the 6mm’s must explore both the strengths and limitations of this bore size along with a thorough understanding of game anatomy.


In comparison to the .243Win, factory loads for the .244/6mm Remington are slightly more powerful while hand loads increase this margin further. The .244/6mm has two levels of performance which can be generally divided into; factory rifles with 22” barrels versus custom long magazine rifles with 24” barrels.  The latter produce a noticeable increase in muzzle velocities with hand loads over both the .243Win and standard .244/6mmRem. 


As with several Remington cartridges, the .244/6mm was designed with generous freebore. This allows both factory and hand loads to be driven at high velocities with relatively low pressures. By adopting a custom rifle with a magazine length more suited to the long 57mm Roberts/Mauser case, the performance of the .244/6mm can be enhanced further.

 

.243 Winchester 22” bl 24”bl

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3130 3200

FL Federal 100gr SP 2890 2960

HL 85gr 3200 3270

HL 95gr 3050 3120

HL 100gr 3000 3070

.244/6mm Remington. Factory short magazine @ 2.83”/ 72mm

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3300 3370

HL 95gr 3100 3170

HL 100gr 3050 3120

.244/6mm Remington. Custom rifle, magazine 3.300”/84mm plus

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3350 3400

HL 95gr 3150 3200

HL 100gr 3100 3150

.240 Weatherby. 6mm-06 Improved

FL/HL 100gr SP 3260 3330

The table above shows comparisons between the .243 and .244/6mm in both 22 and 24” barrels. Also shown is the results of using a longer magazine custom rifle for the .244/6mm and the effects of hand loaded bullets, seated out long to increase powder capacity. Lastly, the .240 Weatherby, essentially a 6mm-06 Improved, is shown for further comparisons. Please bear in mind that there are no absolutes and that individual rifles will display variations in velocity. 


Long magazine custom rifles (especially on the mid length Mauser M98 action) have from time to time, been popular amongst 6mm bore fans as a basis for building high velocity optimum performance .244/6mm rifles. Fortunately, the chamber specifications and throat length as determined by Remington and standardized by SAAMI are perfectly balanced for full utilization of the 57mm case without any need for custom throating.


Readers must also bear in mind that any power increase of the .244/6mm over typical .243 hand load velocities (85gr bullet at 3200fps) poses an increase in recoil which may not be suitable for certain hunters. Along with this, driving a 100 grain 6mm projectile at 3150fps still does not make the .244/6mm Remington as effective and forgiving as cartridges in the power range of the 7mm08 when heavily muscled or heavily boned game are encountered. Instead, the high velocities of a fully optimized .244/6mm simply increase the range of the 6mm bore’s ability to produce fast kills on medium game.


The .243 produces its fastest kills inside 200 yards or at impact velocities above 2650fps. The standard .244/6mm increases this range by around 25 yards while a custom .244/6mm with 24” barrel produces its fastest kills inside 260 yards, a difference of only 60 yards over the somewhat smaller .243. That said, 60 yards is 60 yards and any increases in fast killing and wound trauma are definitely positive aspects of performance.


Between 300 and 400 yards, the .244/6mm produces a wide wound channel however game may show no sign of a hit and escape considerable distances. On stout game such as hogs, shot placement is very important, as regardless of the high velocity that the .244/6mm is capable of, mature boars can be very difficult to anchor.


 

1 banner advert resize


Factory Ammunition

Remington now list only one load for the .244/6mm, the 100 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3100fps for a realistic 3030fps in 22” barrels. This load is not suitable for the twist rate of the original .244 rifles, suited only to rifles stamped 6mm Remington or custom rifles with the appropriate twist rate. This is a much more potent load than other entry level budget loads for the .243Win which generally achieve 2890fps from 22” barrels. The Core-Lokt has a low BC however most 6mm projectiles including the sleek Hornady SST suffer the same limitations. The 100 grain Core-Lokt is a punchy load, fast expanding with reliable controlled expansion and gives best performance (fastest killing) on medium game inside 175 yards. 

 

Federal have taken the .244/6mm Remington under their wing and produce several highly useful loads.  These include an 80 grain soft point at an advertised 3400fps for 3300fps in 22” barrels, the 85 grain Barnes TSX at 3350fps for 3270fps, a 100 grain soft point at 3100fps for 3030fps and lastly, the excellent 100 grain Partition at 3100fps for 3030fps in 22” barrels.

 

Both the 80 and 100 grain soft point bullets are low budget, entry level loads. The Federal Vital-Shok bullet (formally Hi-Shok) is not quite as well constructed as the Remington Core-Lokt regarding deep penetration however wounding is very much the same. The 80 grain bullet is of course designed for varminting but is also suitable for lightly built game weighing up to and around 40kg (90lb).

 

The 85 grain Barnes TSX produces the deepest penetration of all 6mm projectiles but wounding is slightly narrower, decreasing in performance at ranges beyond 200 yards. This bullet is best utilized on heavily muscled / boned medium game to help promote full expansion and violent wounding of which, the 85 grain TSX is fully capable of.  

 

The 100 grain Partition is a particularly useful load, especially at .244/6mm muzzle velocities. This bullet is fast expanding, ideal for lean animals but also relatively deep penetrating, ideal for stout animals. This is another load which does its best work inside 175 yards where velocity remains above 2650fps.


 

Hand Loading

Brass for the .244/6mm is still produced by Remington however 7x57 brass can also be re-sized and trimmed to suit. Suitable powders for light weight varmint projectiles include those in the IMR 4064 and Varget (ADI2208) range. For 80 to 105 grain projectiles, medium slow burning powders in the 4350 range work best. Long magazine custom rifles have the advantage of being able to utilize slow burning powders in the 4831 range without suffering powder compression. This powder is best suited to 100 and 105 grain bullets.


As already stated, the .244/6mm can be divided into two levels of performance; factory rifles versus custom long magazine rifles. Further categorization includes variations in barrel length and the limitations posed by the varying twist rates. The table given in the performance section of this text is an attempt to take many of these variables into account and to some extent, help explain why published data for the .244/6mm Remington also varies considerably.


The .244/6mm Remington produces similar performance with component projectiles to its cousin the .243 Winchester. To this end and to avoid repetition, projectile performance is discussed in great detail within that text.


One separate mention must go to the 105 grain Hornady A-Max. In rifles of suitable twist rate and barrel length, this longster can be driven at 3100fps. The BC of the A-Max is a huge .5, far greater than other .243 projectiles. Expansion on game is violent, velocity and energy retention down range are high, along with low wind drift. For those wanting a lighter medium game load specifically for open country hunting / extended ranges, the A-Max is an excellent projectile with superior wounding to competitive brands at the 300 yard mark and beyond. Please bear in mind however, this projectile was not designed as a hunting bullet and cannot be expected to produce deep penetration on stout bodied game.


 

Closing Comments

The .244/6mm Remington is becoming increasingly rare as time passes but has managed to retain a small fan base. Like the .243, this cartridge has both great strengths and considerable weaknesses. The key, is learning how to minimize the latter and optimize the former. Game anatomy, game killing, accuracy, trajectory and wind drift are all factors that 6mm users need to learn inside and out. Of course - the same should apply to all hunters regardless of whether they use a higher powered cartridge. Perhaps the weaknesses of the 6mm’s are in fact their greatest strengths if viewed as a learning tool.

 

Suggested loads: 6mm/.244 Remington Barrel length: 22

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

2 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

3 FL Fed 85gr Barnes TSX .206 .333 3270 2018

4 FL Fed 100gr SP. .242 .355 3030 2038

5 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3300 2055

6 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3100 2027

7 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3050 2065

8 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3400 2181

9 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3200 2160

10 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3150 2203

11 HL 105gr A-Max .254 .500 3100 2240  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths  

1 Yards 100 225 300 325 350  

  Bt. path +2 0 -5.4 -8 -11  

2 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

3 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

4 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

5 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

6 Yards 100 150 280 320 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -6 -9 -12.5  

7 Yards 100 150 275 315 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -6.5 -9.5 -13  

8 Yards 100 150 308 350 375 400 425  

  Bt. path +3 +4 0 -3 -5.5 -8.5 -12.7  

9 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -5 -7.6 -10.7  

10 Yards 100 150 288 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5 -7.8 -10.9  

11 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path + 3.8 0 -3 4.6 7.2 10    

 

 

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2306 1181

2 300 7.7 2306 1181

3 300 7.4 2460 1142

4 300 7.7 2308 1183

5 300 7.8 2450 1133

6 300 7.8 2369 1184

7 300 6.9 2378 1255

8 300 7.5 2531 1209

9 300 7.1 2453 1270

10 300 6.6 2463 1347

11 300 5 2569 1539 Note: Loads 8,9,10,11 for custom rifles with 24” barrels.




Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 254 - Pins and Heat

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking decapping pins, annealing, and a good starting book.

  1. Jayson Friedman posted in TRR …. Any advice on loading 124grn 9’s sub and still cycling the sig p365 slide.

  2. Kole Everhart posted in TRR --- Thank you for all the help, I was able to get new decapping pins on order. What's the budget approach to dealing with crimped primer pockets?


    1. A few suggestions from the members:

      Anthony Stonecipher Heavy duty decap pin.
      Glen Meisner Sharp drill bit in your hand.
      Jon Denning Decap then swage or ream so you can reprime. You will not be able to reprime if you don’t.
      Michiel Ayers Mighty Armory makes a de-cap and swager in one unit, great product.

    2. RCBS swager combo 2

    3. Dillon Super Swage 600

  3. Kole Everhart posted in TRR: In need of help. I bought 223 rcbs ar series dies and had the decapping pin break almost instantly. RCBS offers a couple different styles of decapping pins, does anyone know which ones I need?

  4. Eric Robertson posted in TRRG I’m hand-annealing, and feel like I can get decently consistent results (hand drill on slow speed rotating the case in a deep well socket, neck and shoulder over a propane torch, counting to a metronome). I’ve been dropping the rounds into a dish of water to quench them when I finish the heating. Any issue with that? Should they “air” cool?

    1. Tempilaq

  5. Tyler N Trisket posted in TRRG: I'm looking to get into reloading I've been saving my brass from federal for when I get equipment and knowledge. 9mm 223 and 50ae. What's recommended to start with on the research path like books or links to articles?

    1. ABC's of Reloading

  6. Todd Ferns posted in TRRG: I’m in need of some help I cast for and reload for a 1911 with powder coated bullets I just picked up a sig p320. Can I run cast bullets through that barrel. I know you can’t with a glock but I’m not sure about a sig. please help.



Hi My name is Travis and I'm sending this message to weigh in on the issue of chamber pressure as it pertains to the length of a barrel given the same calibre, bullet, brass, etc... and whether you would see higher pressure.

The chamber pressures from one to the other will be the same essentially unless there is a major discrepancy or variation in chamber dimensions. The barrel length will increase the duration to which the pressure is able to take effect on the bullet as it pertains to acceleration. But when you will see the highest pressure is when the ignition occurs, and the pressure rises in the case before the bullet is dislodged from it's static location I.E crimped in its case. Jim mentioned previously how the bullet "Welds it self to the brass" when he was talking about his 280AI loads concentricity and how it would take adjusting seating depth slightly to release the mechanical lock of the bullet in the brass this is what is the cause of the high initial pressure. As the vessel increases the pressure will drop as was stated. The vessel being the space in the chamber and barrel behind the bullet as it leaves the barrel. The powder does have a greater amount of time to burn but as the bullet is down the barrel further it will help overall velocity but it won't make the pressure reach the initial pressure seen in the chamber at ignition before the bullet is dislodged. Additionally this is why jamming a bullet into the lands can be so dangerous as this is one of the biggest reasons that one will see extreme pressure spikes. My best regards to you all from Down here in DIckeyville Wisconsin not too far from Mike over near Madison WI, Keep up the good work guys..

I'm an avid handloader for precision shooting, and I do my fair share of "reloading" as well for plinking pistol rifle, and shotgun. Ranging from 9mm up to 300 RUM.





Cartridge corner: .22-243 Winchester


.22-243


History


The .243 Winchester cartridge released in 1955 was without a doubt, an immense success. The demand for the .243 ensured large supplies of inexpensive, readily available brass and this in turn made the .243 an ideal candidate for wildcatting.


By the early 60's wildcatters were experimenting with versions of the .243 case necked down to .224. Of these, two wildcats were standardized by reamer and reloading die makers. Both designs remain popular to this day. The first version is the .243 necked down to .224 with no other change and is designated as the .22-243 Winchester. The second version was created by Paul Middlestead of California and features a sharper 30 degree shoulder, which in turn gives a longer neck for flexible bullet seating. This latter cartridge was named the .22-243 Middlestead and is currently the more popular of the two.


Performance

The .22-243 is of course most effective as a varmint cartridge. On medium game, performance is relative to shot placement, bullet construction and range. The .22-243 can be a very spectacular killer with attention to the above factors. On light bodied game this cartridge is fast killing out to 125 yards and clean killing out to around 325 yards (impact velocities of 2600 fps and above)


The .22-243 seldom produces hydrostatic shock, especially in comparison to the parent .243 cartridge.  Recoil is lower than the .243 but not to a greatly noticeable degree. Noise from the ultra supersonic crack of projectiles traveling at 3800fps can be extremely painful when hunting in the field without earplugs.

More notes on performance can be found in the .220 Swift text which is the main body text for the ultra velocity .22’s


1 banner advert resize

Factory Ammunition

No factory ammunition is produced for this wildcat cartridge.


Hand Loading

In either version, the .22-243 gives higher velocities than hand loads for the Swift and performs similarly to the .223 WSSM. The .22-243 does it's best work with the same powders that give top performance in the Swift and WSSM. ADI 2208 (Varget) and 4064 work well with bullets up to 55 grains while ADI 2209 or IMR 4350 work well with 60 grain bullets and heavier.


From a 24” barrel, safe working maximum velocities include 4150fps with 50 grain bullets, 3900fps with 55 grain bullets while 60 to 65 grain bullets can be driven over 3700fps. 69 to 70 grain bullets achieve between 3400 and 3500fps while the heavy 80 grain Hornady A-Max can be driven at up to 3300fps.

Because rifles of this caliber must be custom built, the .22-243 owner has an advantage in having a choice of barrel twist rate. If the rifle is to be used on varmints through to light medium game. 1:12 twist barrels offer the possibility of experimenting with low stability FMJ projectiles. The 1:9 twist optimizes the use of heavier bullet weights.


To avoid repetition, readers are advised to study projectile performance as discussed throughout the other .224 references in this knowledge base.


Closing Comments

The .22-243 is a common sense wildcat capable of turning out first class accuracy. This cartridge should seriously be considered by anybody wishing to obtain an ultra flat shooting varmint cartridge. As a medium game cartridge, the .22-243 is particularly well suited to the light bodied animals weighing around 40kg (90lb) but certainly does not offer superior performance to the parent .243 Winchester cartridge.


Suggested loads: .22-243 Barrel length: 24”

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 HL 53gr Barnes TSX .151 .231 3900 1790

2 HL 55gr FMJ .157 .272 3900 1857

3 HL 60gr Nosler Partition .171 .228 3750 1873  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths

1 Yards 100 150 256 296 350 400

Bt. path +1.6 +2 0 -2 -6 -11.5

2 Yards 100 150 267 310 350 400

Bt. path +1.5 +2 0 -2 -5 -9

3 Yards 100 150 251 291 350 400

Bt. path +1.6 +2 0 -2 -6.6 -12  

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 9.6 2570 776

2 300 8 2717 901

3 300 10 2443 795  

Note: Load No.2 can be used to plot trajectory for of 55gr Hornady V-Max.


22 243 final.jpg

Imperial Metric

A .473 12.01

B .471 11.96

C 30deg

D .454 11.53

E .260 6.60

F 1.560 39.62

G .300 7.62

H 2.045 51.94

Max Case 2.045 51.94

Trim length 2.035 51.7  



Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 253 - carpet or concrete

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are debating carpet vs concrete and the process for prepping.

  1. Hey guys,I’m looking at this from a prepping angle, what can be done to make ammo go bang more often than not?  I understand making just to SAAMI spec will ensure chambering. But are there other steps one could take in addition to ensuring the dimensions are correct?  Furthermore I understand that general practice for self defense ammo is premium factory loaded ammo, does this de-prioritize having self reloaded ammo in a prepper’s inventory? Tying the two thoughts together, can any amount of reliability work to reloaded ammo (even crossing from reloading to handloading) overcome one’s trust in premium factory self defense ammo for life or death situation?  Love the show. Keep up the good work

  2. Spent Primers posted in RLPG MeWe: Moving again! New house, new reloading room. Fresh 9.5x12 foot, air conditioned canvas. Should I yank the carpet? I reload rifle, pistol and shotshell but am clean and careful. What do y'all think?

  3. Eddie Almond posted in RLPG FB ---- A quick question. If reloading a rifle and your bullets have a cannelure do you have to crimp. Just curious I mistakenly bought a box of a 100 with a cannelure and was just wandering. By the way it’s 223 bullets.

  4. ??I just purchased a new tikka t3x rifle in 6.5creedmoor. I also purchased 50 new Peterson brass in LR primer pocket. I started load development with two different powders; reloader 16 and reloader 17. This is my second 6.5creedmoor so this caliber isn’t new to reloading for me. I use Redding competition shell holders and national match die set.  Bullet: 143eldx Reloader 17 has a max charge of 41.4 grains in the hornady 10th. I started out with 40.2gr of reloader 17 and moved up to 42.4gr in .2 gr increments. I noticed a very slight ejector mark (mostly visable and couldn’t feel with finger nail) starting at 40.2gr with a velocity of only 2640fps. I kept moving forward as there is no way this seemed correct. The next piece at 40.4 showed no mark. Went through the rest and some showed slight marks and some didn’t all the way up to 42.4. Next I started with reloader 16 at 41.6gr and worked my way up to 44.0gr. Noticing similar results, but no ejector marks until about 42.6gr. Bouncing back and forth between .2gr increments showing slight pressure signs via ejector mark. Nothing extensive, just slight when it showed until I got to 44gr. 44gr showed a mark that could be felt via finger nail, albeit not extreme, but noticeable. There is no load data for this bullet but there is plenty data regarding 140 and 142gr bullets on Alliant a website, which is how I can up with my starting charge. Max for 142gr sierra match king is 43.9gr.Sorry for the long winded email. The whole reason for this long email is frustration. Why do some cases show pressure signs lower on powder charge, but other higher on powder charge not show pressure? Before anyone asks, I full length resized the new brass. Could this be a brass issue? Thanks for any input, Jon Sorry I forgot to add that I’m seating to 2.900” and this eldx touches that lands at 2.925” I’m also using a standard cci 200 primer







Cartridge corner: 280 Remington aka 7 mm Express Rem. (name is no longer used due to confusion with 7 mm Rem Mag


History


The .280 Remington was introduced in 1957. Various sources suggest that Remington engineers were interested in creating a high powered 7mm cartridge for several years before reaching their long term goal. The resulting cartridge was based on the .30-06 case necked down to 7mm (.284”). Although the 7mm-06 wildcat had been in existence for quite some time, the commercial version differed in that the shoulder was set slightly further forwards than the famous .270 Winchester, to avoid the danger of .280 ammunition being accidentally fed into .270 Win caliber rifles.


Initially, the .280 was chambered in the Remington Model 740 semi automatic rifle. To function smoothly in the auto loader, factory ammunition was loaded to mild pressures. The first factory load featured a 150 grain bullet at an advertised velocity of 2810 fps but in sporting rifles, true velocities were closer to 2670 to 2740fps. The already popular .270 Winchester was loaded to higher pressures, giving much higher velocity, thus the .280 was poorly received by hunters. Later, Remington introduced a 165 grain round nosed bullet at an advertised 2820fps but at true velocities of around 2680 to 2750 and with a poor aerodynamic form, this did nothing to help the .280.


A further blow to the general acceptance of the .280 occurred after the release of the 7mm Remington Magnum in 1962, a cartridge which went on to become one of the most popular cartridges in American history. By the mid 1960's the .280 was available in all of Remington's action configurations however the cartridge still failed to gain attention. By the mid 1970's production of .280 ammunition almost ceased completely.


In 1979, Remington increased the powder charges of .280 factory ammunition and re-named the .280 cartridge as the 7mm Express Remington in an effort to bring attention to this newly improved performance. During the name change initial confusion resulted in one production run of barrels having 7mm06 stamped on them. Over time, due to confusion between the 7mm Express Remington and the 7mm Remington Magnum, the cartridge finally went back to it's original name, the .280 Remington.


It was a long time before hunters began to notice that the .280 had both the potential to fire heavy bullets of a similar weight to the .30-06, while still having the high shock at extended ranges and flat trajectory of the .270 Winchester. Twenty years after its introduction hunters finally began to realize that the .280 was a strong contender as an all-round medium game cartridge and for a brief period, during the late 1980's, demand for .280 caliber M700 rifles exceeded production. Outside of the U.S, hunters began to notice the growing popularity of the .280 in the States via published literature and by the early 1990's, hunters from all over the world started to take more interest in the performance of the .280 cartridge.


In gun magazine columns of the 1990’s, technical editors were bombarded with letters asking about the performance of the .280 versus the long time worldwide favorite .270 Winchester cartridge. A hot topic for some time was the question of whether the forwards shoulder and slightly wider bore of the .280 could achieve higher velocities than the .270. Arguments then began over the fact that the .280, while having slightly higher velocity, had poorer ballistic coefficients than the .270 which therefore cancelled out any velocity gain. This argument was relevant to the 140 grain bullet weight, popular with both .270 and 7mm users at that time.


Ultimately, the .280 showed an irrelevant 20-50fps gain in velocity over the .270 in barrels of equal length with 140 to 150 grain bullets. The true strength of the .280 was its ability to utilize longer, sleek 160-162 grain bullets. By 2000, much of the popularity of the .280 Remington had once again waned. Fans of the .270 stayed with the .270, fans of the .30-06 stuck to the .30-06 while 7mm fans chose either the compact 7mm08 or the highly emphatic 7mm Remington Magnum or the later 7mmWSM.


Today, the .280 retains moderate popularity. Factory ammunition users still have a rather limited choice of somewhat lack luster ammunition however hand loaders have never had it better. In recent years, the availability of extremely high BC 7mm projectiles has breathed new life into the .280. The combination of high BC’s combined with mild recoil, have made the .280 and .280 Ackley Improved wildcat, highly favored cartridges for long range hunters wanting to build light and set limits on recoil accordingly, recoil to both the shooter and rifle platform. The .280 is also suitable for high power long range competition however recoil and throat wear are considered extreme in comparison to currently favored cartridges.


Most major firearm manufacturers now offer factory standard rifles in .280 Remington. Weatherby and Sako have traditionally utilized 1:10 inch twist barrels which for hand loaders can be too slow for optimum accuracy with 160 grain bullets. The Winchester M70 rifles in circulation feature 1:9.5 twist barrels while Remington currently (2012) use a 1:10 twist barrel, optimized for the many 140 grain factory loads. The 1:10 twist is somewhat of a shame considering that the 1:9 twist rate is ideal for 120-180 grain bullets.


Regarding pressures, SAAMI currently rate the .280 Remington at 60,000 psi versus 65,000 psi for the .270 Winchester (transducer method). This converts to 50,000 CUP for the .280 versus 52,000 CUP for the .270. These figures represent the Maximum Average Pressure (MAP), meaning the recommended maximum pressure level for loading commercial ammunition. This does not however mean to say that factory ammunition is actually loaded to these pressures.

Performance


As has already been stated, factory ammunition for the .280 Remington can be somewhat mild. Most off the shelf loads tend to feature a basic 140 or 150 grain soft point load with a relatively low BC and less than optimal muzzle velocity. Out to moderate ranges, such loads tend to produce a broad wound, adequate penetration and fast killing on medium game. As ranges exceed 250 yards, kills can become quite slow.  This is also very typical of the basic 130 grain factory SP loads for the .270 Winchester. With both cartridges, select premium factory loads produce excellent performance however these are often priced beyond the reach of the average hunter. As always, hand loads give excellent performance at a much lower cost than premium factory loads.

With hand loads, the .280 can be adapted to a variety of game, from varmints to large framed, heavily built medium game. Loaded with fast expanding, sleek 140 to 150 grain bullets, the .280 is a fast killer of light framed medium game. That said, the .280 produces optimum performance with 150 to 162 grain bullets.  Deep penetrating projectiles such as the 150 grain Scirocco, 154 grain InterBond or 160 grain Nosler Partition give excellent results on both light and tough medium game out to ranges exceeding 300 yards.


At long ranges and where twist rates allow, the soft 162 grain Hornady A-max produces violent wounding, performing very well out to ranges of around 700 yards when used by intermediate experienced long range shooters, continuing to produce desirable performance out to ranges of around 1200 yards in expert hands.

The only disadvantage of the .280 Remington, in comparison to the parent .30-06 cartridge, is that for large heavily muscled animals the .30-06 user has a choice of 180 to 240 grain projectiles of both soft or heavy construction. To this end, the .30-06 is a more versatile cartridge for hunting heavily bodied game weighing 320kg (700lb) and heavier.


1 banner advert resize

Factory Ammunition


Remington currently produce four loads for the .280 including, the 140 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3000fps, the 140 grain Accutip at 3000fps, the 150 grain Core-Lokt at 2890fps and the 165 grain Core-Lokt round nose bullet at 2820fps. These velocities are seldom achieved in older 22” barreled sporting rifles which tend to produce velocities 140fps below advertised specifications. More recently, rifle manufacturers have produced 24” barreled sporters and from these, loads tend to be closer to Remington’s advertisements but still around 70fps slower than test barrel figures.


Both the 140 and 150 grain Core-Lokt bullets are outstanding medium range, medium game loads. Unfortunately both bullets have immensely poor BC’s, producing delayed kills beyond 150 yards (2600fps) although wounding is vivid. Beyond 250 yards wounding is narrow and kills can be very slow. The Core-Lokt loads are best suited to hunters on a limited budget and with some understanding to limitations, careful shot placement (forwards shoulder) minimizes any unwanted results.


The 165 grain round nose bullet is an adequate woods load for medium game weighing up to 150kg (330lb) as well as Elk at 320kg (700lb) but not suitable for more aggressive animal species weighing more than 150kg. Unfortunately the 7mm bore diameter does not derive any direct benefit from round or flat nose bullets unless the bullet tip features a means of enhancing trauma (Norma 170 grain Vulcan). As for bullet deflection through brush, high SD pointed 7mm 160 to 175 grain projectiles are just as reliable as traditional brush busting bullets and calibers. To this end, while the 165 grain Core-Lokt is reliable and effective at close to moderate ranges on quite a wide range of game, a pointed projectile would show greater versatility.


The Premium 140 grain Accutip is quite an outstanding performer. This bullet, although designed for longer range work, is at its most spectacular at close to moderate ranges. Beyond 200 yards jacket core separation can sometimes occur however, deep, heavily raking penetration is usually a requirement when snap shooting at close ranges. In most cases, at longer ranges, the Accutip will produce a free bleeding exit wound on lighter medium game weighing less than 70kg (155lb) and arrest against offside skin on game weighing up to 90kg (200lb). Wounds become narrow below 2400fps (320 yards) and much narrower at 2200fps (440 yards) although shots that strike bone at 2000fps tend to produce excellent results. The Accutip is not well suited to game heavier than 90kg (200lb).


Winchester currently offer one load for the .280, the 140 grain Supreme Ballistic Silvertip at a true 3040fps in 24” barrels. For some reason, as effective as the 140 grain BST is on light framed game, this bullet is very lack luster. The BST is often used to take large, heavily bodied deer but is not particularly well suited to this application due to the light bullet construction and lack of controlled expansion. Instead, the BST excels on light bodied animals, weighing less than 70kg (155lb) out to 450 yards.


Current offerings from Federal include the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip at 2990fps, the 140 grain Nosler Accubond at 3000fps, the 140 grain Barnes TSX at 2890fps, the 150 grain American Eagle (previously Hi-Shok) at 2890fps, the 150 grain Nosler Partition at 2890fps and the 160 grain Accubond at 2800fps. Federal also produce a 140 grain Fusion brand load at 2990fps. While federal were once quite atrocious with regard to published versus true velocities, this company are now very honest and transparent. The above velocities are true for 24” barrels while 22” sporters tend to lose around 70fps.


The Winchester and Federal versions of the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip load are for the most part, identical. The difference between the two is that the Winchester load features Olin’s Lubalox bullet coating which eliminates copper fouling and enables maximum velocities with mild pressures. The 140 grain Accubond is a superb medium game bullet, producing a desirable combination of wounding versus deep penetration on medium game out to 450 yards. This bullet does its best work on game weighing less than 90kg (200lb) however hunters continue to push the use of this bullet well beyond this weight, sometimes to the detriment of the bullet maker when results are less than desirable. The 140 grain TSX is ideally suited to large, heavily bodied medium game. On lighter medium game, the TSX is fast killing above 2600fps or 125 yards, but beyond this range, rear lung shots often producing delayed kills, regardless of wide internal wounding.


Federal’s 150 grain American Eagle bullet is now an old bullet design. Its form is much the same as the Core-Lokt but the Federal is more brittle and at close ranges tends to shed during penetration, rather than mushroom. Past 150 yards kills can be slow due to the less than optimal BC of .415 resulting in low hydrostatic and hydraulic shock. This is a basic load for factory ammunition users on a limited budget but also a good load for testing 100 yard accuracy due to Federals high quality controls.


The 150 grain Federal Nosler Partition load produces excellent performance across a wide range of game weights from the lightest of game, through to animals weighing around 150kg (330lb). The Partition produces its most spectacular results inside 150 yards but with its soft front section continues to produce wide wound channels out to 250 yards (2400fps), gradually deteriorating in performance at the 2200fps (360 yards) mark. The Partition can be pushed to 3000fps with hand loads to maximize performance but as a factory loading, this velocity is difficult to reach without potential pressure problems.


For heavier game, the Federal 160 grain Accubond load is effective but again, carefully developed (and chronographed) hand loads tend to produce greater velocities of 2900fps and slightly higher if pushed to maximum limits. Nevertheless, at 2800fps, the Accubond achieves relatively deep penetration without excessive weight loss. Wounding is best inside 2400fps or 250 yards and rather than a widely diffused violent wound, as occurs with the Partition, the 160 grain Accubond tends to produce more centralized wounding, not unlike the basic Remington Core-Lokt and Hi-Shok at moderate ranges. The 160 grain Accubond is not an exceptionally deep penetrator, in no way similar to the Barnes 140 grain TSX but on game weighing between 80 and 320kg (180-700lb), the Accubond is a good all round bullet.


Federal’s more recent invention, the 140 grain Fusion bullet is somewhat mild at 2990fps and having a poor BC of .390, loses velocity very quickly. The Fusion projectile is a core bonded design (perhaps even copper electro-plated) but is brittle in nature and prone to excessive (with regard to its design goals) weight loss during penetration. The Fusion bullet is slow to expand and on lighter animals, can fail to initiate hydrostatic shock at impact velocities of 2850fps yet cannot be expected to penetrate vitals from tail on shots on animals weighing 40kg (90lb). Federal would do well to drop this design and utilize their 150 grain Hotcor with cannelure, giving both better shock, deeper penetration and greater economy for end users.


Hornady, recognizing the need for high velocity .280 loadings have no listings in their custom line and instead feature two loadings in their light magnum line, now re-branded as Superformance. These include the 139 grain GMX at 3070fps and the 139 grain SST at 3090fps. Both loads achieve their stated velocity in 24” barrels, losing around 70fps in 22” barrels. The SST is a spectacular killer when driven at these velocities although it is best suited to lighter medium game, up to body weights of about 70kg (155lb) as a safe maximum. The GMX is quite the opposite, like the Barnes TSX, better suited to heavily muscled game if any error in shot placement is a possibility beyond 150 yards. It would be good to see Hornady offer the 154 grain SST and InterBond as a dual option for the .280 as both projectiles work extremely well from this cartridge platform.

Hand Loading


Although some of the most recent .280 factory loads deliver near maximum velocities, hand loading is still by far the most economical means of obtaining optimum performance from this cartridge.


Several factors determine velocity potential of the .280. As can be expected, short free bore, 22” barreled rifles can be much slower than longer barreled, long free bore rifles. From 22” barreled rifles, maximum safe working velocities include 3000fps with 140 grain bullets, 2900fps with 150 grain bullets and 2800fps with 160 grain bullets. Rifles with 24” barrels will normally give 50fps increase above these figures for 3050fps, 2950fps and 2850fps respectively.   


To some extent custom barreled .280 rifles are both more common and of greater popularity than factory rifles. SAAMI specifications give the .280 a relatively short free bore, ideal for the full range of bullet weights from 120 to 180 grains. But for those who wish to utilize bullets weighing between 150 and 180 grains, the SAAMI specification can be a handicap. It is therefore advisable, if custom building a .280 rifle for maximum down range energy, to have the free bore cut to a length suited to this application. That said, it is imperative to check magazine box lengths to see if a long COAL is actually workable.


A small selection of rifle actions with suitable box magazines for a long .280 include the Winchester long action M70 (all variants), Remington M700 Long, Sako long (internal magazine models) or the economical Howa Long action (Weatherby Vanguard). All of these rifles have internal box magazines greater than 90mm (3.5" ) in length. Barrels with a 1:9" twist rate are extremely versatile giving top accuracy with bullets weighing between 120 and 175 grains.


Good ‘dummy’ max COAL’s for chamber cutting include: the Hornady 154 or 162 grain Interlock seated to touch the rifle lands at 87mm or 154-162 grain InterBond or SST seated to touch at 89mm. A freebore cut to either of the above specs (both equate to the same COAL) works well with the 150 grain Scirocco, the full range of 160-175 grain hunting bullets and the 180 grain VLD. If the rifle is to be used for dedicated long range hunting with the 168 grain VLD or A-Max, a max COAL of 87.5mm is the most versatile. These COAL’s optimize case capacity based on a 1mm (40 thou) bullet jump. Those who prefer minimal bullet jump should shorten the above suggested max COAL’ accordingly.


From a long freebore, 26” barreled custom rifle, typical velocities include 3100fps with 140 grain bullets, 3000fps with 150 grain bullets, 2950fps with the 154 grain SST and InterBond, 2900fps with the 162 grain A-Max and SST, 2850fps with the 168 grain VLD and 2750fps using the 180 grain VLD. Long barreled .280 caliber rifles produce relatively low felt recoil, low recoil torque to bedding surfaces and a reduction in perceived noise.


Brass for the .280 Remington is readily available although cases are just as easily fire formed from .270Win brass. Optimum powders for 120 to 150 grain bullets or short free bore rifles are the medium slow burners in the ADI 2209 / H4350 range. Optimum burn rates for heavy bullets include powders in the ADI 2213sc / H4813sc range.  


The .280 can be loaded with light 120 to 130 grain bullets for use on varmints to light game however most 139-140 grain bullets give just as spectacular (usually more so) killing along with superior exterior ballistics. Nevertheless, where a light recoiling down load is required, the two most outstanding performers are the 120 grain Nosler ballistic Tip loaded to between 2700 and 2900fps and the 130 grain Sierra Single shot pistol loaded to 2700fps to 2800fps.


For the .280, the most useful range of Sierra projectiles include the 140 grain and 170 grain Pro-Hunter, the 140, 150, 160 and 175 grain GameKing bullets along with the 150 and 175 grain MatchKing bullets. Of these, the 150 and 160 grain GK are good open country medium game bullets, especially suited to hunters on a tight budget. The 150 grain bullet is ideally suited to goat/sheep while the 160 grain bullet is better suited to deer in the 70 to 120kg (154-264lb) range.

Sierra seem to have a knack of creating highly effective round nose bullets and the 170 grain Pro-hunter, although not a commonly used projectile, delivers excellent performance at close ranges on medium game.  The economical Pro-Hunter is far tougher than Hornady’s round nose bullets, a sometimes highly desirable feature considering the stress placed on a projectile with a wide frontal area and its exposed lead core on impact. The tough jacket and cannelure of the Sierra are effective at arresting bullet expansion during penetration. Naturally, the faster the Sierra is driven, the more spectacular the wounding although at full .280 velocities of 2700fps, penetration can be compromised if tail on shots on medium game weighing up to 80kg (180lb) are to be expected.

Sierra’s 175 grain GameKing projectile is too stout for fast killing of medium game at .280 velocities. The same can be said for the 150 and 175 grain MatchKing projectiles. About the only creature that can make the SMK work as a long range hunting projectile is the humble pig. A wild pig has a dense body to initiate bullet expansion but is not normally so heavy in the body as to be classed as a large heavy game species - although exceptions do of course frequently occur.


The Speer 145 grain Hotcor projectile works well in the .280 out to moderate ranges but is slightly handicapped by a low BC of .416. To counter this Speer produce a 145 grain BTSP which can be used in conjunction with the Hotcor. On lighter medium game, these two projectiles offer a unique level of performance, producing very fast killing and excellent penetration. It would be nice to see the 145 grain Hotcor permanently replaced by the 150 grain Hotcor with cannelure which Speer manufacture for Federal, along with the creation on a 150 grain BTSP counterpart.


The 160 grain Hotcor can sometimes prove too stout for fast killing of light or lean bodied animals at all velocity levels. Wounding is extremely violent at close ranges yet light animals will often run great distances before succumbing to blood loss. This projectile is especially well suited to game weighing between 80 and 150kg (180-330lb) and adequate for heavier game of up to 320kg, though not as reliable as the 160 grain Nosler Partition design. Nevertheless, this is a very good bullet for medium weight game and can be used in conjunction with the Speer 160 grain BTSP to increase flexibility.


The 160 grain Speer BTSP is an excellent longer range projectile for medium game. From a potential muzzle velocity of 2900fps, the BTSP disintegrates readily and is therefore not suitable for the large, heavily muscled animals such as Elk, more so at close ranges. This projectile comes into its own at impact velocities of between 2600 and 2200fps (170 to 410 yards) if it is to be used on a wide range of body weights. Wounding gradually begins to deteriorate as velocity approaches 2000fps (545 yards) but if bone is hit, killing can be very fast.


Nosler’s 140 grain Partition and Ballistic Tip are both adequate performers in the .280 however the best of the lightweights is the 140 grain Accubond ideally suited to lighter bodied medium game, up to a maximum body weight of 150kg (330lb) out to ranges of around 350 yards. The Nosler 150 grain Ballistic Tip is a good performer on light animals at extended ranges. This projectile is stouter than the Speer BTSP projectiles but delivers deep, broad wounding out to 350 yards. It is not the most flexible of projectiles but is versatile on all body weights up to around 70kg (155lb).

The Nosler 150 grain Partition produces a unique level of performance. Bullet weight and construction are ideal for medium weight deer species. For hunters having problems with slow killing at normal hunting ranges, the 150 grain Partition produces a benchmark level of violent wounding, adequate penetration and fast killing. This projectile is versatile over a wide range of body weights up to 180kg (400lb) down to impact velocities of 2200fps.

Of  the 160 grain Accubond and 160 grain Partition, the Partition is a far more violent projectile - a pity considering the excellent BC of the Accubond. Both are highly useful projectiles in the .280 Remington however to some extent, the former Partition design can sometimes prove to be the more dramatic killer of the two when either launched at lower than magnum velocities or at extended ranges, it really is an outstanding killer of both light and larger medium game. Both are adequate for use on Elk sized game although not quite as emphatic as the .300 Magnum/Nosler offerings. Neither projectile seems to out penetrate the other by an noticeable degree. A mention must also go to the 175 grain Partition, a fast expanding projectile producing deep penetration - aided by mild muzzle velocities when used in the .280.

Besides Nosler, Hornady produce some very useful projectiles, well suited to .280 velocities. Entry level projectiles include the 139 grain Interlock flat base and Interlock BTSP. Both are adequate light game bullets, certainly not as spectacular as Hornady’s more recent designs. Both the FBSP and BTSP are very soft, losing over 50% weight after impact. These projectiles are best suited to hunters on a limited budget.

The 139 grain SST and 139 grain InterBond are very useful together. Both have the same form factor and BC, in most instances shooting to the same POI out to all ranges. The .280 (and 7mm Rem Mag) wring maximum performance from the 139 grain SST/InterBond combination. The SST produces spectacular results on lean animals out to 375 yards (2400fps), maintaining broad internal wounding out to 480 yards (2200fps). Beyond this range kills can be very delayed if shoulder bones are not struck. That said, it is possible to push the use of this projectile out to 600 yards (2000fps) with quite acceptable results.

The 139 grain InterBond produces wide wounding and high shock at impact velocities above 2600fps (250 yards), gradually losing its ability to create wide, fast bleeding wounds as velocity approaches 2400fps (375 yards). At impact velocities of 2100fps, with rear lung shots on light or lean medium game, the InterBond is only able to expand to a frontal area diameter of approximately 10mm (.400”), producing lung wounds of a similar diameter. The InterBond is therefore much better suited to either close to moderate ranges or tough animals, in lieu of a heavy bullet and shift in POI.

The 154 grain flat base and 162 grain BTSP Interlock projectiles are both excellent lighter medium game projectiles. Although the 162 grain BTSP is designed to produce reliable penetration at magnum velocities, this projectile is not really suitable for heavily muscled, large medium game, regardless of the lower .280 velocities. Instead, this projectile really shines as an economical medium game bullet, doing its best work on animals weighing up to 80kg (180lb).

Hornady’s 154 grain SST and InterBond are another excellent combination. The InterBond should be annealed for best results (see 7mm Rem Mag) while the 154 grain SST does not show any noticeable improvements from this process. Both of these projectiles have a relatively high BC of .525 and from a muzzle velocity of 2950fps, the SST delivers excellent wounding out to 450 yards (2200fps) and much further if major bones are encountered to initiate expansion. The InterBond is most effective inside 320 yards (2400fps). These two projectiles are able to tackle a wide range of body weights and ranges, the SST is ideal for game weighing up to 90kg (200lb), the IB adequate for heavy bodied deer species such as Elk. The IB is similar in terminal performance to the 160 grain Accubond, regardless of differences in metallurgy and design.

The Hornady 162 grain SST can be made into quite a useful all round projectile once annealed. After this process, retained weight usually averages 50% which may not be very high however potential incidents of jacket core separation are eliminated. As with almost all 7mm projectiles, the 162 grain SST produces hydrostatic shock on medium game species at impact velocities of above 2600fps which in the .280 at up to 2900fps, equates to 175 yards. As with other SST designs, wide wounding occurs down to velocities of 2200fps (440 yards) however with rear lung shots, kills can be slightly delayed beyond the 2600fps barrier, becoming slower as velocity decreases. The 162 grain SST is particularly well suited to all body weights up to 150kg (330lb).

For long range hunting, the 162 grain Hornady A-Max is outstanding. Penetration on light bodied game at close ranges is thorough but on large animals, full cross body penetration (exit wounding) cannot be expected. As the A-Max breaks the 2600fps mark (200 yards), it comes into its own. The 162 grain A-Max adequately destroys the vitals of heavy bodied deer species such as Elk at extended ranges but is not quite as deep penetrating as either the 180 grain 7mm VLD or heavy .30 caliber A-Max and VLD projectiles.  The 162 grain A-Max is somewhat better suited to light to mid sized medium game if consistently satisfying results are to be expected.


From an MV of 2900fps, the A-Max produces very wide wounding out to 825 yards (1800fps), gradually decreasing in performance though still producing thorough wounding and clean killing at 1400fps (1200 yards). Generally speaking, for long range shooting, intermediate experienced shooters tend to have less wind drift errors at velocities above 1800fps. Below 1800fps, a far greater level of skill is required in order to read wind correctly and place shots accurately.

One projectile that deserves consideration is the Swift 150 grain Scirocco. This is a sleek bullet with a high BC of .515 along with a bullet weight suited to a huge range of the worlds most common game species (goat/sheep/deer/antelope). The Scirocco looks entirely different to the 154 grain InterBond yet both have near identical wounding characteristics, the annealed IB being slightly superior with regard to penetration. Nevertheless, the Scirocco, driven at 3000fps, stays above the 2600fps mark out to 225 yards and continues to produce a highly traumatic wound out at 300 yards. The Scirocco is particularly good for light yet tough animals within these ranges. Swift also manufacture 140, 160 and 175 grain A-Frame bullets, the latter 160 and 175 grain projectiles producing excellent performance on large medium game out to moderate ranges of 250 yards.

The .280 can drive the Barnes range of TSX projectiles at high velocities yet the light 120 grain TSX and Tipped TSX are the best choice for this cartridge when used on lean bodied deer. The 120 grain TTSX driven at 3300fps, is most effective out to 250 yards (2600fps). For those who can read winds, the 120 grain TTSX driven forwards into shoulder bones, continues to produce wide wounding and fast killing out to 330 yards (2400fps). Beyond this velocity barrier, wounding is narrower than that which can be achieved with a frangible projectile. The 140, 150 and 160 grain TSX are more suited to game weighing over 90kg (200lb) and all three will produce exit wounds on game weighing up to 320kg (700lb). The 160 and 175 grain TSX are adequate for head and neck shooting large heavy game if necessity dictates that the .280 must be used.


Berger produce three long range hunting bullets for the 7mm bore, the 140 grain VLD, 168 grain VLD and 180 grain VLD. Of these, the 168 grain VLD is the most useful in the .280 Remington, obtaining a balance of high velocity, high BC and SD and excellent terminal performance at extended ranges. The 168 grain VLD has a low surface bearing area and is relatively easy to work with when looking for maximum muzzle velocities combined with optimum accuracy. In many cases this bullet can be pushed as fast or even slightly faster than a 160 grain bullet.

Like the A-Max, the 168 grain VLD is best suited to light to mid weight deer species. The major difference between the A-Max and the VLD, is that the VLD tends to (but not always), break down into smaller fragments than the A-Max. The 168 grain VLD has slightly greater potential to produce shallow penetration if used at close range on large bodied game however, using the VLD in this way, works against its strengths. At very close ranges, neck and head shots on large bodied game eliminate undesirable results. As velocities approach 2600fps (around 175 yards), the 168 grain VLD boasts spectacular performance.  Exit wounds on light to mid weight game are often up to above 3” in diameter (as also happens at point blank ranges on lean bodied game).

The 180 grain VLD bullet can be driven at around 2700-2750fps in standard configuration 24” barreled .280 rifles. From custom 26-27” long range hunting rifle barrels, the 180 grain VLD can be pushed to 2850fps (full 32” target barrels can comfortably achieve 2950fps). Unfortunately,  the 2011 orange box VLD needs to hit bone to prevent pin hole wounding at long ranges. Hopefully, Berger will produce a more frangible 180 grain VLD duplicating the original bullet in the future. If this can be achieved, regardless of whether the 180 grain bullet is driven at 2700fps or 2850fps, the VLD will once again be an exceptional performer down to 1400fps across an immensely wide range of body weights.


One common chambering for custom rifles is the .280 Ackley improved. This pushes the shoulder forwards to 40 degrees and minimizes body taper. The Ackley improved is sometimes quoted as giving a 100fps gain in velocity over the standard cartridge. In some instances, the higher velocity comes more as a result of maximum loading. Those who are contemplating the AI version, to avoid disappointment, should not expect velocity gains of more than 50fps. One of the greater benefits of the Ackley is minimizing case growth and the need for trimming, especially useful for hand loaders using progressive reloading operations such as the Hornady Lock N Load reloading station.

Closing Comments


The .280 Remington is an outstanding medium game cartridge. While the popularity of this cartridge has always remained limited in mainstream hunting circles, the .280 is a popular choice among custom rifle builders. The only trap is that because of its excellent exterior ballistics, many hand loaders have a tendency to want to push this performance further, to 7mm Remington Magnum velocities. If a given rifle cannot produce optimum desired velocities without excessive pressure, the hunter must come to terms with the fact that they may need to move to a more powerful cartridge. The .280 can be built with a long barrel and long free bore to produce both high velocity and low recoil, however it does have its velocity limitations, not weaknesses, but limitations.


As a long range medium game hunting cartridge, the .280 is limited by the abilities of the shooter to read wind more so than any limitation of cartridge wounding power. The same can be said of the 7mm-08, both cartridges have the capacity to produce broad wounding out to considerable ranges.

The .280 cannot produce wounds as wide as the larger bores when used on large heavily built game. Shot placement and bullet selection are as always, key factors when using the .280 on large body weights.

Suggested loads: .280 Remington Barrel length:24”, 26”

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 140gr Core-Lokt .248 .390 2930 2668

2 FL 139gr SST Superf .246 .486 3090 2946

3 HL 154gr SST/IB .273 .525 2900 2875

4 HL 160gr Partition .283 .475 2850 2885

5 HL 162gr A-Max .287 .625 2850 2921

6 HL 162gr A-Max .287 .625 2920 3067  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths

1 Yards 100 150 260 300 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -5.6 -8.6 -12 -16

2 Yards 100 150 286 330 350 375 400 425

Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5.1 -7.8 -10.8 -14.2

3 Yards 100 150 265 305 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4.8 -7.5 -10.6 -14.1

4 Yards 100 150 257 297 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.5 0 -3 -5.9 -8.8 -12.2 -16

5 Yards 100 150 264 305 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4.9 -7.5 -10.6 -14

6 Yards 100 150 272 312 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4 -6.5 -9.4 -12.6  

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2249 1573

2 300 5.6 2516 1954

3 300 5.6 2388 1949

4 300 6.4 2293 1868

5 300 4.7 2420 2107

6 300 4.6 2484 2219  




Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons

  • New Patreons:

  • Current Patreons: Mr. Anonymoose, Mark H, John. C, Shane D, Anthony B, Tim A, Mike S, Russ H, Atilla the Hun, Richard C, Joel L., Rick R.,  Aaron S, David S. Erich S, Troy S, Peter D, and Brewer Bill

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 252 - you going to coat that

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking powder coating vs HiTek and other things.

  1. In the AR-15 platform, could loads that are too light cause doubles?

  2. Joe Commesso posted in RLPG MeWe: Is anyone hitting 150 yards consistently with a 45 Colt lever action rifle?

  3. Russ Harrison posted in RLPG MeWe: Travis mentioned on the last live cast that he preferred powder coating over HiTek coated. I shoot the HiTek coated Acme bullets. What is the difference between the two coatings? I also presumed that they were the same thing.

    1. https://www.powderbuythepound.com/



  1. Paul Lowd posted in RLPG FB: Lyman has apparently decided to jump into the progressive press market.





Cartridge corner: The 204 Ruger was developed from the .222 Remington Magnum, which has the second largest case capacity in the family that began with the .222 Remington.[3] Only the European 5.6×50mm Magnum is larger, which itself is a lengthened version of the 222 Remington Magnum. The 222 Remington Magnum provides about 5% more usable (below the neck) case capacity than the most popular member of the family, the NATO 5.56×45mm (.223 Remington). To make the 204 Ruger, the 222 Remington Magnum case was necked down to .204 inches (5 mm) and shoulder moved forward and angle increased to 30 degrees.[4] Bullets available in .204 caliber range from 24 to 55 grains (1.55517g to 3.56g).[5] The Hornady factory load is listed at 4,225 ft/s (1288 m/s) with a 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet.[6] To achieve these velocities, the factory uses a proprietary powder composition known internally as SMP746, specially formulated by Primex, and not currently (2013) available to handloaders. The propellant features a de-coppering agent that helps prevent fouling. Reloading data from Hornady, using commercially available powders, indicate velocity peaking at just under 4,200 ft/s (1,300 m/s) with the 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet in longer barrels. Many AR-15 rifle manufacturers now offer the .204 Ruger as an alternative chambering alongside the usual 5.56×45mm/.223 Rem.

The .204 Ruger was the second Ruger-named cartridge produced by a partnership between Ruger and Hornady, the first being the big bore .480 Ruger revolver cartridge introduced in 2003 for the Super Redhawk. With the backing of a major gunmaker and a major ammunition company, the round was an instant success, with other ammunition makers and firearms makers quickly adding the new chambering. Ruger's initial offerings included the bolt action Model 77 MKII, and the single shot Ruger No. 1, and Hornady offered loadings with 30-and-40-grain (1.9 and 2.6 g) bullets.

The .204 Ruger has proven to be a very accurate and efficient cartridge: an early tester reported 1/2 MOA groups at 100 yards (91 m) with the Hornady loads and a Ruger #1 Varmint rifle. This is not surprising, considering that the first cartridge in the family, the .222 Remington, was a top benchrest shooting cartridge for many years after its introduction.

The .204 Ruger was intended primarily for varmint rifles, which require bullets with flat trajectories but not much mass or kinetic energy. The .204 was "splitting the difference" between the popular .224 varmint rounds such as the .220 Swift and .22-250 Remington, and the tiny .172 caliber rounds such as the .17 Remington and the .17 HMR. The resulting cartridge provides somewhat higher velocities than any of these, giving a maximum point blank range of more than 270 yards (250 m).

Velocity[edit]

Ruger's claim to being the velocity king with the .204 was based on two points.

First, no other high performance 20 caliber cartridge was commercially produced. Second, the ammunition used to achieve the 4225 ft/s was available only from Hornady using a special powder not available to the general public.[7]

Note that handloaders typically achieve velocities more in the area of 4,100 ft/s (1,200 m/s) using a 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet.[8]

Note also that handloads using a 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet in other commercial cartridges such as the .22-250 Remington also achieve velocities similar to those of the .204 Ruger. The advantage of the .204 Ruger is that it achieves these velocities with less powder, less recoil, and less heat than the larger cartridges. The 204 Ruger has a maximum range of approximately 500 yards (460 m).

Hornady now offers a 24-grain lead free cartridge that claims 4400 fps from a 26" barrel.[9] However, Hornady's 35 gr NTX .22-250 claims 4450 fps from a 24" barrel.

.204 Ruger 32 GR V-MAX 83204

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

4225/1268

3645/944

3137/699

2683/512

2272/367

1899/256

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

0.6

0.00

-4.1

-13.1

-29.0


.204 Ruger 40 GR V-MAX 83206

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

3900/1351

3482/1077

3103/855

2755/674

2433/526

2133/404

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

0.7

0.00

-4.3

-13.2

-28.1


.204 Ruger 45 GR SP 83208

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

3625/1313

3188/1015

2792/778

2428/589

2093/438

1787/319

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

1.0

0.0

-5.5

-16.9

-36.3



Type

Rifle

Place of origin

USA

Production history

Designer

Ruger/Hornady

Designed

2004

Produced

2004–Present

Specifications

Parent case

.222 Remington Magnum

Case type

Rimless, bottleneck

Bullet diameter

.204 in (5.2 mm)

Neck diameter

.2311 in (5.87 mm)

Shoulder diameter

.3598 in (9.14 mm)

Base diameter

.3764 in (9.56 mm)

Rim diameter

.378 in (9.6 mm)

Rim thickness

.0449 in (1.14 mm)

Case length

1.850 in (47.0 mm)

Overall length

2.2598 in (57.40 mm)

Rifling twist

1-12

Primer type

small rifle

Ballistic performance




Bullet mass/type

Velocity

Energy


32 gr. (2.1 g) BT

4,225 ft/s (1,288 m/s)

1,268 ft⋅lbf (1,719 J)

40 gr. (2.6 g) BT

3,900 ft/s (1,200 m/s)

1,351 ft⋅lbf (1,832 J)

45 gr. (2.9 g) SP

3,625 ft/s (1,105 m/s)

1,313 ft⋅lbf (1,780 J)

40 gr. (2.6 g) Hornady V-Max, Norma

3,806 ft/s (1,160 m/s)

1,195 ft⋅lbf (1,620 J)


Source(s): Hornady[1] Norma[2]



Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons

  • New Patreons:

  • Current Patreons: Mr. Anonymoose, Mark H, John. C, Shane D, Anthony B, Tim A, Mike S, Russ H, Atilla the Hun, Richard C, Joel L., Rick R.,  Aaron S, David S. Erich S, Troy S, Peter D, and Brewer Bill

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast