Reloading Podcast 259 - basic hunting load question

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about a couple hunting loads.

  1. Just settled on a Glock 40 10mm pistol for handgun hunting. Since I reload most all of my needed ammunition, I seem to be at a loss for hunting powerloads as compared to Underwood and Buffalo bore. I've been reloading most all of my pistol/rifle ammo due to lots of published information but 10mm seems to be limited in recommendations....... Scott M.

  2. Big fan and Patreon of the podcast and FRN. Really enjoy all your content and the banter. I appreciate your attention to detail and accuracy of information. For context, before I get to my question, I have about a decade of reloading experience, loading common calibers like 45 ACP and 5.56 on a Dillon 650 and handloading niche calibers like 5.7x28, 458 SOCOM, and 45 Raptor on a single stage.  I just bought and am breaking in a Q Fix bolt action in 308. 16 inch barrel, 1:10 twist, and I run a SilencerCo Omega 30 on it. I want to take this hunting this fall, Elk. So, I am looking to work up a hunting load for the rifle. What I am looking for is a bullet recommendations to try out, and do ladder loads with. I was thinking of something in the 168-175 grain area, and I don't plan on taking any shots past 400 or 500 yards.  My first thought was the Barnes TTX and Varget, but happy to take any suggestions. I want to try out a few things regardless. I have chrono'd some factory Federal 175 grain match ammo, getting velocities about 200-300 fps slower than on the box. Makes sense with the barrel length. Of note, I'm putting rounds on top of each other at 100 yards, so it shoots fine. Additionally, figure that I am taking shots at 5000-7000 feet elevation.  Any starting suggestions would be much appreciated. Nick M





Cartridge corner: No cartridge corner this week


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

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How to get in contact with us:

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Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 258 - forming brass from other brass

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering questions.

  1. Conversation about the best twist rate for a standardized bullet weight: That does make me wonder if you had a custom 1:10.25 barrel made, how much better would it do than a regular 1:9 twist? Are we talking 1 MOA difference or 0.1 MOA?

    https://www.vcalc.com/wiki/AndrewBudd/Greenhill+Formula+for+Optimal+Rifling+Twist+Rate

  2. Jordan Baker posted in TRRFB: Needing some advice/help with forming brass. Recently picked up a Arisaka Type 99 to add to my military collection. Read a few articles on forming 7.7 jap from 30-06.

    Trimmed down a case and applied RCBS lube to it and ran it thru a 7.7 jap die. Mouth sized fine. Shoulder got set back fine. But I can not get the entire case to feed into the die. I lack about 3/4 of an inch.

    Is there anything special I need to do to the die as far as adjusting goes or is there something else I’m missing? As now right now, the brass will not feed into the gun. Thanks a lot.

  3. Attention Chris Sharpe, hold off on the Annie Annealer, I just got an Annealeze, and let me anneal a few cases and we’ll do a review of it on an upcoming show?

  4. John Normoyle posted in TRR MeWe Group: Crazy question. I used to have an app that searched for the best deals on reloading components. For example, .223 cal 62 grain bullets. It would give a list of say 10 places. The cost per box, the cost per bullet and a link(?). For the life of me i cannot find it on my phone and a search of the play store (android device).

    Does anyone have any clue what i am going on about?

  5. Ryan Beasley post in TRR FB:  7.0gn of trailboss in a .44mag is weak! Should I go over the chart or switch powders?

  6. Brian Shepley posted in TRR FB: Thinking of starting to load shot shells. Thinking of taking up skeet shooting and thinking of saving some coin. In doing a search of the forum, I see Lee Loadall and Mec 600 Jr being pretty popular. Is there a better one?

    1. Lyman 5th Shotshell Reloading Manual






Cartridge corner: 


Reviews: Author: RSChapin

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Title: Excellent

Review: I’ve listened to them all. It’s hard to comprehend having so much material, but it’s there.



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 257 - Broken Balls

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking broken stems and tumbling.

  1. Ryan Degn posted in RLPG FB Unfortunately while trying to quickly de-prime a case I stuck a case in my die. In the process of removing the case I broke the expander ball of the stem. I have replacement stems and decapping pins. But I cannot find the carbide ball anywhere. Any help please. Hornady .223 die.

  2. Denny Rice posted in RLPGFB ---- Ok guys I want to pick your brains...again. I am looking at wet tumblers, its between the Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series or Extreme Tumblers Rebel 17...Which one and why? There is about a 70 dollar difference in the two machines. Thanks for the input.





Cartridge corner: .244/6mm Remington

History


In the early 1950’s, Remington engineers began research towards a 6mm cartridge suitable for varmints through to deer. Having settled on the .257 Roberts case as the base for their design, the project members focused on suitable bullet weights. After much testing, it was determined that in the Roberts case, optimum performance came from bullets weighing 75 grains for varmints up to a maximum of 90 grains for use on deer. A slow rifling pitch of 1:12 (one turn per twelve inches) was chosen to stabilize these bullet weights and in 1955 the .244 Remington was officially introduced. In the same year, Winchester introduced the .243 Winchester, utilizing 80 to 100 grain bullets and featuring a barrel twist rate of 1:9.


Both cartridges were designed for dual use on varmints through to deer however the shooting public assumed that because the Remington used lighter bullets, it must have been designed as a varmint cartridge first and foremost. On top of this, the long .244 cartridge was chambered in a short action not ideally suited to the 57mm case. With 100 grain bullets the .244 might lose powder capacity. The public was decided and .243 sales took off leaving the .244 in the dust.


In 1963 Remington attempted to regain ground by releasing .244 rifles with a new 1:9 twist to handle heavier bullets. The cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington and new ammunition was loaded giving the hunter the choice of either an 80gr bullet for varmints or a 100 grain bullet for deer. The changes had little effect on the market and the 6mm Remington has dwindled ever since. 


Remington has not produced 6mm Remington caliber rifles for several years and the 244/6mm Remington is today, somewhat of a classic cartridge. This cartridge is also occasionally adopted by hunters as a custom rifle chambering.


 

Performance

As previously stated in the .243 Winchester text, the greatest virtue of both the .243 and .244/6mm is that these cartridges offer adequate killing power for lighter medium game at a noise and recoil level that can help any hunter to shoot calmly and accurately. However, the 6mm bore is not nearly as forgiving as wider bore sizes and those who use the 6mm’s must explore both the strengths and limitations of this bore size along with a thorough understanding of game anatomy.


In comparison to the .243Win, factory loads for the .244/6mm Remington are slightly more powerful while hand loads increase this margin further. The .244/6mm has two levels of performance which can be generally divided into; factory rifles with 22” barrels versus custom long magazine rifles with 24” barrels.  The latter produce a noticeable increase in muzzle velocities with hand loads over both the .243Win and standard .244/6mmRem. 


As with several Remington cartridges, the .244/6mm was designed with generous freebore. This allows both factory and hand loads to be driven at high velocities with relatively low pressures. By adopting a custom rifle with a magazine length more suited to the long 57mm Roberts/Mauser case, the performance of the .244/6mm can be enhanced further.

 

.243 Winchester 22” bl 24”bl

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3130 3200

FL Federal 100gr SP 2890 2960

HL 85gr 3200 3270

HL 95gr 3050 3120

HL 100gr 3000 3070

.244/6mm Remington. Factory short magazine @ 2.83”/ 72mm

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3300 3370

HL 95gr 3100 3170

HL 100gr 3050 3120

.244/6mm Remington. Custom rifle, magazine 3.300”/84mm plus

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3350 3400

HL 95gr 3150 3200

HL 100gr 3100 3150

.240 Weatherby. 6mm-06 Improved

FL/HL 100gr SP 3260 3330

The table above shows comparisons between the .243 and .244/6mm in both 22 and 24” barrels. Also shown is the results of using a longer magazine custom rifle for the .244/6mm and the effects of hand loaded bullets, seated out long to increase powder capacity. Lastly, the .240 Weatherby, essentially a 6mm-06 Improved, is shown for further comparisons. Please bear in mind that there are no absolutes and that individual rifles will display variations in velocity. 


Long magazine custom rifles (especially on the mid length Mauser M98 action) have from time to time, been popular amongst 6mm bore fans as a basis for building high velocity optimum performance .244/6mm rifles. Fortunately, the chamber specifications and throat length as determined by Remington and standardized by SAAMI are perfectly balanced for full utilization of the 57mm case without any need for custom throating.


Readers must also bear in mind that any power increase of the .244/6mm over typical .243 hand load velocities (85gr bullet at 3200fps) poses an increase in recoil which may not be suitable for certain hunters. Along with this, driving a 100 grain 6mm projectile at 3150fps still does not make the .244/6mm Remington as effective and forgiving as cartridges in the power range of the 7mm08 when heavily muscled or heavily boned game are encountered. Instead, the high velocities of a fully optimized .244/6mm simply increase the range of the 6mm bore’s ability to produce fast kills on medium game.


The .243 produces its fastest kills inside 200 yards or at impact velocities above 2650fps. The standard .244/6mm increases this range by around 25 yards while a custom .244/6mm with 24” barrel produces its fastest kills inside 260 yards, a difference of only 60 yards over the somewhat smaller .243. That said, 60 yards is 60 yards and any increases in fast killing and wound trauma are definitely positive aspects of performance.


Between 300 and 400 yards, the .244/6mm produces a wide wound channel however game may show no sign of a hit and escape considerable distances. On stout game such as hogs, shot placement is very important, as regardless of the high velocity that the .244/6mm is capable of, mature boars can be very difficult to anchor.


 

Factory Ammunition

Remington now list only one load for the .244/6mm, the 100 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3100fps for a realistic 3030fps in 22” barrels. This load is not suitable for the twist rate of the original .244 rifles, suited only to rifles stamped 6mm Remington or custom rifles with the appropriate twist rate. This is a much more potent load than other entry level budget loads for the .243Win which generally achieve 2890fps from 22” barrels. The Core-Lokt has a low BC however most 6mm projectiles including the sleek Hornady SST suffer the same limitations. The 100 grain Core-Lokt is a punchy load, fast expanding with reliable controlled expansion and gives best performance (fastest killing) on medium game inside 175 yards. 

 

Federal have taken the .244/6mm Remington under their wing and produce several highly useful loads.  These include an 80 grain soft point at an advertised 3400fps for 3300fps in 22” barrels, the 85 grain Barnes TSX at 3350fps for 3270fps, a 100 grain soft point at 3100fps for 3030fps and lastly, the excellent 100 grain Partition at 3100fps for 3030fps in 22” barrels.

 

Both the 80 and 100 grain soft point bullets are low budget, entry level loads. The Federal Vital-Shok bullet (formally Hi-Shok) is not quite as well constructed as the Remington Core-Lokt regarding deep penetration however wounding is very much the same. The 80 grain bullet is of course designed for varminting but is also suitable for lightly built game weighing up to and around 40kg (90lb).

 

The 85 grain Barnes TSX produces the deepest penetration of all 6mm projectiles but wounding is slightly narrower, decreasing in performance at ranges beyond 200 yards. This bullet is best utilized on heavily muscled / boned medium game to help promote full expansion and violent wounding of which, the 85 grain TSX is fully capable of.  

 

The 100 grain Partition is a particularly useful load, especially at .244/6mm muzzle velocities. This bullet is fast expanding, ideal for lean animals but also relatively deep penetrating, ideal for stout animals. This is another load which does its best work inside 175 yards where velocity remains above 2650fps.


 

Hand Loading

Brass for the .244/6mm is still produced by Remington however 7x57 brass can also be re-sized and trimmed to suit. Suitable powders for light weight varmint projectiles include those in the IMR 4064 and Varget (ADI2208) range. For 80 to 105 grain projectiles, medium slow burning powders in the 4350 range work best. Long magazine custom rifles have the advantage of being able to utilize slow burning powders in the 4831 range without suffering powder compression. This powder is best suited to 100 and 105 grain bullets.


As already stated, the .244/6mm can be divided into two levels of performance; factory rifles versus custom long magazine rifles. Further categorization includes variations in barrel length and the limitations posed by the varying twist rates. The table given in the performance section of this text is an attempt to take many of these variables into account and to some extent, help explain why published data for the .244/6mm Remington also varies considerably.


The .244/6mm Remington produces similar performance with component projectiles to its cousin the .243 Winchester. To this end and to avoid repetition, projectile performance is discussed in great detail within that text.


One separate mention must go to the 105 grain Hornady A-Max. In rifles of suitable twist rate and barrel length, this longster can be driven at 3100fps. The BC of the A-Max is a huge .5, far greater than other .243 projectiles. Expansion on game is violent, velocity and energy retention down range are high, along with low wind drift. For those wanting a lighter medium game load specifically for open country hunting / extended ranges, the A-Max is an excellent projectile with superior wounding to competitive brands at the 300 yard mark and beyond. Please bear in mind however, this projectile was not designed as a hunting bullet and cannot be expected to produce deep penetration on stout bodied game.


 

Closing Comments

The .244/6mm Remington is becoming increasingly rare as time passes but has managed to retain a small fan base. Like the .243, this cartridge has both great strengths and considerable weaknesses. The key, is learning how to minimize the latter and optimize the former. Game anatomy, game killing, accuracy, trajectory and wind drift are all factors that 6mm users need to learn inside and out. Of course - the same should apply to all hunters regardless of whether they use a higher powered cartridge. Perhaps the weaknesses of the 6mm’s are in fact their greatest strengths if viewed as a learning tool.

 

Suggested loads: 6mm/.244 Remington Barrel length: 22

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

2 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

3 FL Fed 85gr Barnes TSX .206 .333 3270 2018

4 FL Fed 100gr SP. .242 .355 3030 2038

5 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3300 2055

6 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3100 2027

7 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3050 2065

8 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3400 2181

9 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3200 2160

10 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3150 2203

11 HL 105gr A-Max .254 .500 3100 2240  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths  

1 Yards 100 225 300 325 350  

  Bt. path +2 0 -5.4 -8 -11  

2 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

3 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

4 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

5 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

6 Yards 100 150 280 320 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -6 -9 -12.5  

7 Yards 100 150 275 315 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -6.5 -9.5 -13  

8 Yards 100 150 308 350 375 400 425  

  Bt. path +3 +4 0 -3 -5.5 -8.5 -12.7  

9 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -5 -7.6 -10.7  

10 Yards 100 150 288 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5 -7.8 -10.9  

11 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path + 3.8 0 -3 4.6 7.2 10    

 

 

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2306 1181

2 300 7.7 2306 1181

3 300 7.4 2460 1142

4 300 7.7 2308 1183

5 300 7.8 2450 1133

6 300 7.8 2369 1184

7 300 6.9 2378 1255

8 300 7.5 2531 1209

9 300 7.1 2453 1270

10 300 6.6 2463 1347

11 300 5 2569 1539 Note: Loads 8,9,10,11 for custom rifles with 24” barrels.


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 256 - Taking out the crimps

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Rusten Bullard posted in RLPG Gentlemen. Today was a ground breaking day. I’ve been catching brass for some time now. Collecting equipment. Painting the room. Drawing the plans for the bench. Today I sorted brass. Today I tumbled my first brass!.

    I’m really excited about the endeavor.

    If you could indulge me please. What percentage of you do the majority of your reloading sitting on a stool vs standing at your bench? I’m trying to establish an appropriate height for my bench. Your bench height references would be helpful as well. I’m 6’ tall.

  2. Tom Pedersen posted in RLPG : Removing primer crimps is the worst. I have an RCBS swager and a Lyman reamer.

    Usually I Chuck up the reamer in a drill and run them through cause it's faster than swaging.

    Anyone have tips/methods that make this suck less?




Cartridge corner: 


Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room 

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 255 - #FWARMS

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about dies, scales and a giveaway.

  1. Ryan Degn posted in RLPG FB Unfortunately while tryin to quickly de-prime a case I stuck a case in my die. In the process of removing the case I broke the expander ball of the stem. I have replacement stems and decapping pins. But I cannot find the carbide ball anywhere. Any help please. Hornady .223 die.

  2. Denny Rice posted in RLPGFB ---- Ok guys I want to pick your brains...again. I am looking at wet tumblers, its between the Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series or Extreme Tumblers Rebel 17...Which one and why? There is about a 70 dollar difference in the two machines. Thanks for the input.

  3. J Andrew Burnett posted in RLPG FB ---- I’m a precision rifle handloader and to that end I take my details very seriously. I have always used a balance beam scale which I’ve basically been very happy with. After playing around with an RCBS Chargemaster I found it lacking in the consistency department so I have continued to go with the balance beam. Now the question, has any ever seen a “precision” balance beam scale with very thin, precise hash marks? I ask because the marks on mine are thicker than I’d like to really tune the consistency in. Thanks for the help and the show. Love what you guys do.





Cartridge corner: .244/6mm Remington

History


In the early 1950’s, Remington engineers began research towards a 6mm cartridge suitable for varmints through to deer. Having settled on the .257 Roberts case as the base for their design, the project members focused on suitable bullet weights. After much testing, it was determined that in the Roberts case, optimum performance came from bullets weighing 75 grains for varmints up to a maximum of 90 grains for use on deer. A slow rifling pitch of 1:12 (one turn per twelve inches) was chosen to stabilize these bullet weights and in 1955 the .244 Remington was officially introduced. In the same year, Winchester introduced the .243 Winchester, utilizing 80 to 100 grain bullets and featuring a barrel twist rate of 1:9.


Both cartridges were designed for dual use on varmints through to deer however the shooting public assumed that because the Remington used lighter bullets, it must have been designed as a varmint cartridge first and foremost. On top of this, the long .244 cartridge was chambered in a short action not ideally suited to the 57mm case. With 100 grain bullets the .244 might lose powder capacity. The public was decided and .243 sales took off leaving the .244 in the dust.


In 1963 Remington attempted to regain ground by releasing .244 rifles with a new 1:9 twist to handle heavier bullets. The cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington and new ammunition was loaded giving the hunter the choice of either an 80gr bullet for varmints or a 100 grain bullet for deer. The changes had little effect on the market and the 6mm Remington has dwindled ever since. 


Remington has not produced 6mm Remington caliber rifles for several years and the 244/6mm Remington is today, somewhat of a classic cartridge. This cartridge is also occasionally adopted by hunters as a custom rifle chambering.


 

Performance

As previously stated in the .243 Winchester text, the greatest virtue of both the .243 and .244/6mm is that these cartridges offer adequate killing power for lighter medium game at a noise and recoil level that can help any hunter to shoot calmly and accurately. However, the 6mm bore is not nearly as forgiving as wider bore sizes and those who use the 6mm’s must explore both the strengths and limitations of this bore size along with a thorough understanding of game anatomy.


In comparison to the .243Win, factory loads for the .244/6mm Remington are slightly more powerful while hand loads increase this margin further. The .244/6mm has two levels of performance which can be generally divided into; factory rifles with 22” barrels versus custom long magazine rifles with 24” barrels.  The latter produce a noticeable increase in muzzle velocities with hand loads over both the .243Win and standard .244/6mmRem. 


As with several Remington cartridges, the .244/6mm was designed with generous freebore. This allows both factory and hand loads to be driven at high velocities with relatively low pressures. By adopting a custom rifle with a magazine length more suited to the long 57mm Roberts/Mauser case, the performance of the .244/6mm can be enhanced further.

 

.243 Winchester 22” bl 24”bl

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3130 3200

FL Federal 100gr SP 2890 2960

HL 85gr 3200 3270

HL 95gr 3050 3120

HL 100gr 3000 3070

.244/6mm Remington. Factory short magazine @ 2.83”/ 72mm

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3300 3370

HL 95gr 3100 3170

HL 100gr 3050 3120

.244/6mm Remington. Custom rifle, magazine 3.300”/84mm plus

FL Federal 85gr TSX 3270 3350

FL Federal 100gr SP 3020 3100

HL 85gr 3350 3400

HL 95gr 3150 3200

HL 100gr 3100 3150

.240 Weatherby. 6mm-06 Improved

FL/HL 100gr SP 3260 3330

The table above shows comparisons between the .243 and .244/6mm in both 22 and 24” barrels. Also shown is the results of using a longer magazine custom rifle for the .244/6mm and the effects of hand loaded bullets, seated out long to increase powder capacity. Lastly, the .240 Weatherby, essentially a 6mm-06 Improved, is shown for further comparisons. Please bear in mind that there are no absolutes and that individual rifles will display variations in velocity. 


Long magazine custom rifles (especially on the mid length Mauser M98 action) have from time to time, been popular amongst 6mm bore fans as a basis for building high velocity optimum performance .244/6mm rifles. Fortunately, the chamber specifications and throat length as determined by Remington and standardized by SAAMI are perfectly balanced for full utilization of the 57mm case without any need for custom throating.


Readers must also bear in mind that any power increase of the .244/6mm over typical .243 hand load velocities (85gr bullet at 3200fps) poses an increase in recoil which may not be suitable for certain hunters. Along with this, driving a 100 grain 6mm projectile at 3150fps still does not make the .244/6mm Remington as effective and forgiving as cartridges in the power range of the 7mm08 when heavily muscled or heavily boned game are encountered. Instead, the high velocities of a fully optimized .244/6mm simply increase the range of the 6mm bore’s ability to produce fast kills on medium game.


The .243 produces its fastest kills inside 200 yards or at impact velocities above 2650fps. The standard .244/6mm increases this range by around 25 yards while a custom .244/6mm with 24” barrel produces its fastest kills inside 260 yards, a difference of only 60 yards over the somewhat smaller .243. That said, 60 yards is 60 yards and any increases in fast killing and wound trauma are definitely positive aspects of performance.


Between 300 and 400 yards, the .244/6mm produces a wide wound channel however game may show no sign of a hit and escape considerable distances. On stout game such as hogs, shot placement is very important, as regardless of the high velocity that the .244/6mm is capable of, mature boars can be very difficult to anchor.


 

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Factory Ammunition

Remington now list only one load for the .244/6mm, the 100 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3100fps for a realistic 3030fps in 22” barrels. This load is not suitable for the twist rate of the original .244 rifles, suited only to rifles stamped 6mm Remington or custom rifles with the appropriate twist rate. This is a much more potent load than other entry level budget loads for the .243Win which generally achieve 2890fps from 22” barrels. The Core-Lokt has a low BC however most 6mm projectiles including the sleek Hornady SST suffer the same limitations. The 100 grain Core-Lokt is a punchy load, fast expanding with reliable controlled expansion and gives best performance (fastest killing) on medium game inside 175 yards. 

 

Federal have taken the .244/6mm Remington under their wing and produce several highly useful loads.  These include an 80 grain soft point at an advertised 3400fps for 3300fps in 22” barrels, the 85 grain Barnes TSX at 3350fps for 3270fps, a 100 grain soft point at 3100fps for 3030fps and lastly, the excellent 100 grain Partition at 3100fps for 3030fps in 22” barrels.

 

Both the 80 and 100 grain soft point bullets are low budget, entry level loads. The Federal Vital-Shok bullet (formally Hi-Shok) is not quite as well constructed as the Remington Core-Lokt regarding deep penetration however wounding is very much the same. The 80 grain bullet is of course designed for varminting but is also suitable for lightly built game weighing up to and around 40kg (90lb).

 

The 85 grain Barnes TSX produces the deepest penetration of all 6mm projectiles but wounding is slightly narrower, decreasing in performance at ranges beyond 200 yards. This bullet is best utilized on heavily muscled / boned medium game to help promote full expansion and violent wounding of which, the 85 grain TSX is fully capable of.  

 

The 100 grain Partition is a particularly useful load, especially at .244/6mm muzzle velocities. This bullet is fast expanding, ideal for lean animals but also relatively deep penetrating, ideal for stout animals. This is another load which does its best work inside 175 yards where velocity remains above 2650fps.


 

Hand Loading

Brass for the .244/6mm is still produced by Remington however 7x57 brass can also be re-sized and trimmed to suit. Suitable powders for light weight varmint projectiles include those in the IMR 4064 and Varget (ADI2208) range. For 80 to 105 grain projectiles, medium slow burning powders in the 4350 range work best. Long magazine custom rifles have the advantage of being able to utilize slow burning powders in the 4831 range without suffering powder compression. This powder is best suited to 100 and 105 grain bullets.


As already stated, the .244/6mm can be divided into two levels of performance; factory rifles versus custom long magazine rifles. Further categorization includes variations in barrel length and the limitations posed by the varying twist rates. The table given in the performance section of this text is an attempt to take many of these variables into account and to some extent, help explain why published data for the .244/6mm Remington also varies considerably.


The .244/6mm Remington produces similar performance with component projectiles to its cousin the .243 Winchester. To this end and to avoid repetition, projectile performance is discussed in great detail within that text.


One separate mention must go to the 105 grain Hornady A-Max. In rifles of suitable twist rate and barrel length, this longster can be driven at 3100fps. The BC of the A-Max is a huge .5, far greater than other .243 projectiles. Expansion on game is violent, velocity and energy retention down range are high, along with low wind drift. For those wanting a lighter medium game load specifically for open country hunting / extended ranges, the A-Max is an excellent projectile with superior wounding to competitive brands at the 300 yard mark and beyond. Please bear in mind however, this projectile was not designed as a hunting bullet and cannot be expected to produce deep penetration on stout bodied game.


 

Closing Comments

The .244/6mm Remington is becoming increasingly rare as time passes but has managed to retain a small fan base. Like the .243, this cartridge has both great strengths and considerable weaknesses. The key, is learning how to minimize the latter and optimize the former. Game anatomy, game killing, accuracy, trajectory and wind drift are all factors that 6mm users need to learn inside and out. Of course - the same should apply to all hunters regardless of whether they use a higher powered cartridge. Perhaps the weaknesses of the 6mm’s are in fact their greatest strengths if viewed as a learning tool.

 

Suggested loads: 6mm/.244 Remington Barrel length: 22

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

2 FL Rem 100gr Core-Lokt .242 .356 3030 2038

3 FL Fed 85gr Barnes TSX .206 .333 3270 2018

4 FL Fed 100gr SP. .242 .355 3030 2038

5 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3300 2055

6 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3100 2027

7 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3050 2065

8 HL 85gr Partition/GK/TSX .206 .315 (Av) 3400 2181

9 HL 95gr SST or Nosler BT .230 .355 3200 2160

10 HL 100gr Partition .242 .384 3150 2203

11 HL 105gr A-Max .254 .500 3100 2240  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths  

1 Yards 100 225 300 325 350  

  Bt. path +2 0 -5.4 -8 -11  

2 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

3 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

4 Yards 100 150 269 310 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -7.4 -10.6 14.3  

5 Yards 100 150 292 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -4.7 -7.4 -10.4  

6 Yards 100 150 280 320 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -6 -9 -12.5  

7 Yards 100 150 275 315 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.7 0 -3 -6.5 -9.5 -13  

8 Yards 100 150 308 350 375 400 425  

  Bt. path +3 +4 0 -3 -5.5 -8.5 -12.7  

9 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.9 0 -3 -5 -7.6 -10.7  

10 Yards 100 150 288 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5 -7.8 -10.9  

11 Yards 100 150 290 330 350 375 400  

  Bt. path + 3.8 0 -3 4.6 7.2 10    

 

 

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2306 1181

2 300 7.7 2306 1181

3 300 7.4 2460 1142

4 300 7.7 2308 1183

5 300 7.8 2450 1133

6 300 7.8 2369 1184

7 300 6.9 2378 1255

8 300 7.5 2531 1209

9 300 7.1 2453 1270

10 300 6.6 2463 1347

11 300 5 2569 1539 Note: Loads 8,9,10,11 for custom rifles with 24” barrels.




Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons 

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



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Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 254 - Pins and Heat

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking decapping pins, annealing, and a good starting book.

  1. Jayson Friedman posted in TRR …. Any advice on loading 124grn 9’s sub and still cycling the sig p365 slide.

  2. Kole Everhart posted in TRR --- Thank you for all the help, I was able to get new decapping pins on order. What's the budget approach to dealing with crimped primer pockets?


    1. A few suggestions from the members:

      Anthony Stonecipher Heavy duty decap pin.
      Glen Meisner Sharp drill bit in your hand.
      Jon Denning Decap then swage or ream so you can reprime. You will not be able to reprime if you don’t.
      Michiel Ayers Mighty Armory makes a de-cap and swager in one unit, great product.

    2. RCBS swager combo 2

    3. Dillon Super Swage 600

  3. Kole Everhart posted in TRR: In need of help. I bought 223 rcbs ar series dies and had the decapping pin break almost instantly. RCBS offers a couple different styles of decapping pins, does anyone know which ones I need?

  4. Eric Robertson posted in TRRG I’m hand-annealing, and feel like I can get decently consistent results (hand drill on slow speed rotating the case in a deep well socket, neck and shoulder over a propane torch, counting to a metronome). I’ve been dropping the rounds into a dish of water to quench them when I finish the heating. Any issue with that? Should they “air” cool?

    1. Tempilaq

  5. Tyler N Trisket posted in TRRG: I'm looking to get into reloading I've been saving my brass from federal for when I get equipment and knowledge. 9mm 223 and 50ae. What's recommended to start with on the research path like books or links to articles?

    1. ABC's of Reloading

  6. Todd Ferns posted in TRRG: I’m in need of some help I cast for and reload for a 1911 with powder coated bullets I just picked up a sig p320. Can I run cast bullets through that barrel. I know you can’t with a glock but I’m not sure about a sig. please help.



Hi My name is Travis and I'm sending this message to weigh in on the issue of chamber pressure as it pertains to the length of a barrel given the same calibre, bullet, brass, etc... and whether you would see higher pressure.

The chamber pressures from one to the other will be the same essentially unless there is a major discrepancy or variation in chamber dimensions. The barrel length will increase the duration to which the pressure is able to take effect on the bullet as it pertains to acceleration. But when you will see the highest pressure is when the ignition occurs, and the pressure rises in the case before the bullet is dislodged from it's static location I.E crimped in its case. Jim mentioned previously how the bullet "Welds it self to the brass" when he was talking about his 280AI loads concentricity and how it would take adjusting seating depth slightly to release the mechanical lock of the bullet in the brass this is what is the cause of the high initial pressure. As the vessel increases the pressure will drop as was stated. The vessel being the space in the chamber and barrel behind the bullet as it leaves the barrel. The powder does have a greater amount of time to burn but as the bullet is down the barrel further it will help overall velocity but it won't make the pressure reach the initial pressure seen in the chamber at ignition before the bullet is dislodged. Additionally this is why jamming a bullet into the lands can be so dangerous as this is one of the biggest reasons that one will see extreme pressure spikes. My best regards to you all from Down here in DIckeyville Wisconsin not too far from Mike over near Madison WI, Keep up the good work guys..

I'm an avid handloader for precision shooting, and I do my fair share of "reloading" as well for plinking pistol rifle, and shotgun. Ranging from 9mm up to 300 RUM.





Cartridge corner: .22-243 Winchester


.22-243


History


The .243 Winchester cartridge released in 1955 was without a doubt, an immense success. The demand for the .243 ensured large supplies of inexpensive, readily available brass and this in turn made the .243 an ideal candidate for wildcatting.


By the early 60's wildcatters were experimenting with versions of the .243 case necked down to .224. Of these, two wildcats were standardized by reamer and reloading die makers. Both designs remain popular to this day. The first version is the .243 necked down to .224 with no other change and is designated as the .22-243 Winchester. The second version was created by Paul Middlestead of California and features a sharper 30 degree shoulder, which in turn gives a longer neck for flexible bullet seating. This latter cartridge was named the .22-243 Middlestead and is currently the more popular of the two.


Performance

The .22-243 is of course most effective as a varmint cartridge. On medium game, performance is relative to shot placement, bullet construction and range. The .22-243 can be a very spectacular killer with attention to the above factors. On light bodied game this cartridge is fast killing out to 125 yards and clean killing out to around 325 yards (impact velocities of 2600 fps and above)


The .22-243 seldom produces hydrostatic shock, especially in comparison to the parent .243 cartridge.  Recoil is lower than the .243 but not to a greatly noticeable degree. Noise from the ultra supersonic crack of projectiles traveling at 3800fps can be extremely painful when hunting in the field without earplugs.

More notes on performance can be found in the .220 Swift text which is the main body text for the ultra velocity .22’s


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Factory Ammunition

No factory ammunition is produced for this wildcat cartridge.


Hand Loading

In either version, the .22-243 gives higher velocities than hand loads for the Swift and performs similarly to the .223 WSSM. The .22-243 does it's best work with the same powders that give top performance in the Swift and WSSM. ADI 2208 (Varget) and 4064 work well with bullets up to 55 grains while ADI 2209 or IMR 4350 work well with 60 grain bullets and heavier.


From a 24” barrel, safe working maximum velocities include 4150fps with 50 grain bullets, 3900fps with 55 grain bullets while 60 to 65 grain bullets can be driven over 3700fps. 69 to 70 grain bullets achieve between 3400 and 3500fps while the heavy 80 grain Hornady A-Max can be driven at up to 3300fps.

Because rifles of this caliber must be custom built, the .22-243 owner has an advantage in having a choice of barrel twist rate. If the rifle is to be used on varmints through to light medium game. 1:12 twist barrels offer the possibility of experimenting with low stability FMJ projectiles. The 1:9 twist optimizes the use of heavier bullet weights.


To avoid repetition, readers are advised to study projectile performance as discussed throughout the other .224 references in this knowledge base.


Closing Comments

The .22-243 is a common sense wildcat capable of turning out first class accuracy. This cartridge should seriously be considered by anybody wishing to obtain an ultra flat shooting varmint cartridge. As a medium game cartridge, the .22-243 is particularly well suited to the light bodied animals weighing around 40kg (90lb) but certainly does not offer superior performance to the parent .243 Winchester cartridge.


Suggested loads: .22-243 Barrel length: 24”

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 HL 53gr Barnes TSX .151 .231 3900 1790

2 HL 55gr FMJ .157 .272 3900 1857

3 HL 60gr Nosler Partition .171 .228 3750 1873  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths

1 Yards 100 150 256 296 350 400

Bt. path +1.6 +2 0 -2 -6 -11.5

2 Yards 100 150 267 310 350 400

Bt. path +1.5 +2 0 -2 -5 -9

3 Yards 100 150 251 291 350 400

Bt. path +1.6 +2 0 -2 -6.6 -12  

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 9.6 2570 776

2 300 8 2717 901

3 300 10 2443 795  

Note: Load No.2 can be used to plot trajectory for of 55gr Hornady V-Max.


22 243 final.jpg

Imperial Metric

A .473 12.01

B .471 11.96

C 30deg

D .454 11.53

E .260 6.60

F 1.560 39.62

G .300 7.62

H 2.045 51.94

Max Case 2.045 51.94

Trim length 2.035 51.7  



Reviews:



Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon and Brownells from the Webpage  it really does help the show and the network.


Patreons

  • New Patreons: Nick M

  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Bill N, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C

  • RLP pledge link


Thank you for listening.



How to get in contact with us:

Google Voice # 608-467-0308

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

Reloading Podcast on MeWe

Reloading Podcast on Gun Groupie

The Reloading Room

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Travis Buck on Facebook

Buckeye Targets

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook



Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast

Reloading Podcast 253 - carpet or concrete

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are debating carpet vs concrete and the process for prepping.

  1. Hey guys,I’m looking at this from a prepping angle, what can be done to make ammo go bang more often than not?  I understand making just to SAAMI spec will ensure chambering. But are there other steps one could take in addition to ensuring the dimensions are correct?  Furthermore I understand that general practice for self defense ammo is premium factory loaded ammo, does this de-prioritize having self reloaded ammo in a prepper’s inventory? Tying the two thoughts together, can any amount of reliability work to reloaded ammo (even crossing from reloading to handloading) overcome one’s trust in premium factory self defense ammo for life or death situation?  Love the show. Keep up the good work

  2. Spent Primers posted in RLPG MeWe: Moving again! New house, new reloading room. Fresh 9.5x12 foot, air conditioned canvas. Should I yank the carpet? I reload rifle, pistol and shotshell but am clean and careful. What do y'all think?

  3. Eddie Almond posted in RLPG FB ---- A quick question. If reloading a rifle and your bullets have a cannelure do you have to crimp. Just curious I mistakenly bought a box of a 100 with a cannelure and was just wandering. By the way it’s 223 bullets.

  4. ??I just purchased a new tikka t3x rifle in 6.5creedmoor. I also purchased 50 new Peterson brass in LR primer pocket. I started load development with two different powders; reloader 16 and reloader 17. This is my second 6.5creedmoor so this caliber isn’t new to reloading for me. I use Redding competition shell holders and national match die set.  Bullet: 143eldx Reloader 17 has a max charge of 41.4 grains in the hornady 10th. I started out with 40.2gr of reloader 17 and moved up to 42.4gr in .2 gr increments. I noticed a very slight ejector mark (mostly visable and couldn’t feel with finger nail) starting at 40.2gr with a velocity of only 2640fps. I kept moving forward as there is no way this seemed correct. The next piece at 40.4 showed no mark. Went through the rest and some showed slight marks and some didn’t all the way up to 42.4. Next I started with reloader 16 at 41.6gr and worked my way up to 44.0gr. Noticing similar results, but no ejector marks until about 42.6gr. Bouncing back and forth between .2gr increments showing slight pressure signs via ejector mark. Nothing extensive, just slight when it showed until I got to 44gr. 44gr showed a mark that could be felt via finger nail, albeit not extreme, but noticeable. There is no load data for this bullet but there is plenty data regarding 140 and 142gr bullets on Alliant a website, which is how I can up with my starting charge. Max for 142gr sierra match king is 43.9gr.Sorry for the long winded email. The whole reason for this long email is frustration. Why do some cases show pressure signs lower on powder charge, but other higher on powder charge not show pressure? Before anyone asks, I full length resized the new brass. Could this be a brass issue? Thanks for any input, Jon Sorry I forgot to add that I’m seating to 2.900” and this eldx touches that lands at 2.925” I’m also using a standard cci 200 primer







Cartridge corner: 280 Remington aka 7 mm Express Rem. (name is no longer used due to confusion with 7 mm Rem Mag


History


The .280 Remington was introduced in 1957. Various sources suggest that Remington engineers were interested in creating a high powered 7mm cartridge for several years before reaching their long term goal. The resulting cartridge was based on the .30-06 case necked down to 7mm (.284”). Although the 7mm-06 wildcat had been in existence for quite some time, the commercial version differed in that the shoulder was set slightly further forwards than the famous .270 Winchester, to avoid the danger of .280 ammunition being accidentally fed into .270 Win caliber rifles.


Initially, the .280 was chambered in the Remington Model 740 semi automatic rifle. To function smoothly in the auto loader, factory ammunition was loaded to mild pressures. The first factory load featured a 150 grain bullet at an advertised velocity of 2810 fps but in sporting rifles, true velocities were closer to 2670 to 2740fps. The already popular .270 Winchester was loaded to higher pressures, giving much higher velocity, thus the .280 was poorly received by hunters. Later, Remington introduced a 165 grain round nosed bullet at an advertised 2820fps but at true velocities of around 2680 to 2750 and with a poor aerodynamic form, this did nothing to help the .280.


A further blow to the general acceptance of the .280 occurred after the release of the 7mm Remington Magnum in 1962, a cartridge which went on to become one of the most popular cartridges in American history. By the mid 1960's the .280 was available in all of Remington's action configurations however the cartridge still failed to gain attention. By the mid 1970's production of .280 ammunition almost ceased completely.


In 1979, Remington increased the powder charges of .280 factory ammunition and re-named the .280 cartridge as the 7mm Express Remington in an effort to bring attention to this newly improved performance. During the name change initial confusion resulted in one production run of barrels having 7mm06 stamped on them. Over time, due to confusion between the 7mm Express Remington and the 7mm Remington Magnum, the cartridge finally went back to it's original name, the .280 Remington.


It was a long time before hunters began to notice that the .280 had both the potential to fire heavy bullets of a similar weight to the .30-06, while still having the high shock at extended ranges and flat trajectory of the .270 Winchester. Twenty years after its introduction hunters finally began to realize that the .280 was a strong contender as an all-round medium game cartridge and for a brief period, during the late 1980's, demand for .280 caliber M700 rifles exceeded production. Outside of the U.S, hunters began to notice the growing popularity of the .280 in the States via published literature and by the early 1990's, hunters from all over the world started to take more interest in the performance of the .280 cartridge.


In gun magazine columns of the 1990’s, technical editors were bombarded with letters asking about the performance of the .280 versus the long time worldwide favorite .270 Winchester cartridge. A hot topic for some time was the question of whether the forwards shoulder and slightly wider bore of the .280 could achieve higher velocities than the .270. Arguments then began over the fact that the .280, while having slightly higher velocity, had poorer ballistic coefficients than the .270 which therefore cancelled out any velocity gain. This argument was relevant to the 140 grain bullet weight, popular with both .270 and 7mm users at that time.


Ultimately, the .280 showed an irrelevant 20-50fps gain in velocity over the .270 in barrels of equal length with 140 to 150 grain bullets. The true strength of the .280 was its ability to utilize longer, sleek 160-162 grain bullets. By 2000, much of the popularity of the .280 Remington had once again waned. Fans of the .270 stayed with the .270, fans of the .30-06 stuck to the .30-06 while 7mm fans chose either the compact 7mm08 or the highly emphatic 7mm Remington Magnum or the later 7mmWSM.


Today, the .280 retains moderate popularity. Factory ammunition users still have a rather limited choice of somewhat lack luster ammunition however hand loaders have never had it better. In recent years, the availability of extremely high BC 7mm projectiles has breathed new life into the .280. The combination of high BC’s combined with mild recoil, have made the .280 and .280 Ackley Improved wildcat, highly favored cartridges for long range hunters wanting to build light and set limits on recoil accordingly, recoil to both the shooter and rifle platform. The .280 is also suitable for high power long range competition however recoil and throat wear are considered extreme in comparison to currently favored cartridges.


Most major firearm manufacturers now offer factory standard rifles in .280 Remington. Weatherby and Sako have traditionally utilized 1:10 inch twist barrels which for hand loaders can be too slow for optimum accuracy with 160 grain bullets. The Winchester M70 rifles in circulation feature 1:9.5 twist barrels while Remington currently (2012) use a 1:10 twist barrel, optimized for the many 140 grain factory loads. The 1:10 twist is somewhat of a shame considering that the 1:9 twist rate is ideal for 120-180 grain bullets.


Regarding pressures, SAAMI currently rate the .280 Remington at 60,000 psi versus 65,000 psi for the .270 Winchester (transducer method). This converts to 50,000 CUP for the .280 versus 52,000 CUP for the .270. These figures represent the Maximum Average Pressure (MAP), meaning the recommended maximum pressure level for loading commercial ammunition. This does not however mean to say that factory ammunition is actually loaded to these pressures.

Performance


As has already been stated, factory ammunition for the .280 Remington can be somewhat mild. Most off the shelf loads tend to feature a basic 140 or 150 grain soft point load with a relatively low BC and less than optimal muzzle velocity. Out to moderate ranges, such loads tend to produce a broad wound, adequate penetration and fast killing on medium game. As ranges exceed 250 yards, kills can become quite slow.  This is also very typical of the basic 130 grain factory SP loads for the .270 Winchester. With both cartridges, select premium factory loads produce excellent performance however these are often priced beyond the reach of the average hunter. As always, hand loads give excellent performance at a much lower cost than premium factory loads.

With hand loads, the .280 can be adapted to a variety of game, from varmints to large framed, heavily built medium game. Loaded with fast expanding, sleek 140 to 150 grain bullets, the .280 is a fast killer of light framed medium game. That said, the .280 produces optimum performance with 150 to 162 grain bullets.  Deep penetrating projectiles such as the 150 grain Scirocco, 154 grain InterBond or 160 grain Nosler Partition give excellent results on both light and tough medium game out to ranges exceeding 300 yards.


At long ranges and where twist rates allow, the soft 162 grain Hornady A-max produces violent wounding, performing very well out to ranges of around 700 yards when used by intermediate experienced long range shooters, continuing to produce desirable performance out to ranges of around 1200 yards in expert hands.

The only disadvantage of the .280 Remington, in comparison to the parent .30-06 cartridge, is that for large heavily muscled animals the .30-06 user has a choice of 180 to 240 grain projectiles of both soft or heavy construction. To this end, the .30-06 is a more versatile cartridge for hunting heavily bodied game weighing 320kg (700lb) and heavier.


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Factory Ammunition


Remington currently produce four loads for the .280 including, the 140 grain Core-Lokt at an advertised 3000fps, the 140 grain Accutip at 3000fps, the 150 grain Core-Lokt at 2890fps and the 165 grain Core-Lokt round nose bullet at 2820fps. These velocities are seldom achieved in older 22” barreled sporting rifles which tend to produce velocities 140fps below advertised specifications. More recently, rifle manufacturers have produced 24” barreled sporters and from these, loads tend to be closer to Remington’s advertisements but still around 70fps slower than test barrel figures.


Both the 140 and 150 grain Core-Lokt bullets are outstanding medium range, medium game loads. Unfortunately both bullets have immensely poor BC’s, producing delayed kills beyond 150 yards (2600fps) although wounding is vivid. Beyond 250 yards wounding is narrow and kills can be very slow. The Core-Lokt loads are best suited to hunters on a limited budget and with some understanding to limitations, careful shot placement (forwards shoulder) minimizes any unwanted results.


The 165 grain round nose bullet is an adequate woods load for medium game weighing up to 150kg (330lb) as well as Elk at 320kg (700lb) but not suitable for more aggressive animal species weighing more than 150kg. Unfortunately the 7mm bore diameter does not derive any direct benefit from round or flat nose bullets unless the bullet tip features a means of enhancing trauma (Norma 170 grain Vulcan). As for bullet deflection through brush, high SD pointed 7mm 160 to 175 grain projectiles are just as reliable as traditional brush busting bullets and calibers. To this end, while the 165 grain Core-Lokt is reliable and effective at close to moderate ranges on quite a wide range of game, a pointed projectile would show greater versatility.


The Premium 140 grain Accutip is quite an outstanding performer. This bullet, although designed for longer range work, is at its most spectacular at close to moderate ranges. Beyond 200 yards jacket core separation can sometimes occur however, deep, heavily raking penetration is usually a requirement when snap shooting at close ranges. In most cases, at longer ranges, the Accutip will produce a free bleeding exit wound on lighter medium game weighing less than 70kg (155lb) and arrest against offside skin on game weighing up to 90kg (200lb). Wounds become narrow below 2400fps (320 yards) and much narrower at 2200fps (440 yards) although shots that strike bone at 2000fps tend to produce excellent results. The Accutip is not well suited to game heavier than 90kg (200lb).


Winchester currently offer one load for the .280, the 140 grain Supreme Ballistic Silvertip at a true 3040fps in 24” barrels. For some reason, as effective as the 140 grain BST is on light framed game, this bullet is very lack luster. The BST is often used to take large, heavily bodied deer but is not particularly well suited to this application due to the light bullet construction and lack of controlled expansion. Instead, the BST excels on light bodied animals, weighing less than 70kg (155lb) out to 450 yards.


Current offerings from Federal include the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip at 2990fps, the 140 grain Nosler Accubond at 3000fps, the 140 grain Barnes TSX at 2890fps, the 150 grain American Eagle (previously Hi-Shok) at 2890fps, the 150 grain Nosler Partition at 2890fps and the 160 grain Accubond at 2800fps. Federal also produce a 140 grain Fusion brand load at 2990fps. While federal were once quite atrocious with regard to published versus true velocities, this company are now very honest and transparent. The above velocities are true for 24” barrels while 22” sporters tend to lose around 70fps.


The Winchester and Federal versions of the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip load are for the most part, identical. The difference between the two is that the Winchester load features Olin’s Lubalox bullet coating which eliminates copper fouling and enables maximum velocities with mild pressures. The 140 grain Accubond is a superb medium game bullet, producing a desirable combination of wounding versus deep penetration on medium game out to 450 yards. This bullet does its best work on game weighing less than 90kg (200lb) however hunters continue to push the use of this bullet well beyond this weight, sometimes to the detriment of the bullet maker when results are less than desirable. The 140 grain TSX is ideally suited to large, heavily bodied medium game. On lighter medium game, the TSX is fast killing above 2600fps or 125 yards, but beyond this range, rear lung shots often producing delayed kills, regardless of wide internal wounding.


Federal’s 150 grain American Eagle bullet is now an old bullet design. Its form is much the same as the Core-Lokt but the Federal is more brittle and at close ranges tends to shed during penetration, rather than mushroom. Past 150 yards kills can be slow due to the less than optimal BC of .415 resulting in low hydrostatic and hydraulic shock. This is a basic load for factory ammunition users on a limited budget but also a good load for testing 100 yard accuracy due to Federals high quality controls.


The 150 grain Federal Nosler Partition load produces excellent performance across a wide range of game weights from the lightest of game, through to animals weighing around 150kg (330lb). The Partition produces its most spectacular results inside 150 yards but with its soft front section continues to produce wide wound channels out to 250 yards (2400fps), gradually deteriorating in performance at the 2200fps (360 yards) mark. The Partition can be pushed to 3000fps with hand loads to maximize performance but as a factory loading, this velocity is difficult to reach without potential pressure problems.


For heavier game, the Federal 160 grain Accubond load is effective but again, carefully developed (and chronographed) hand loads tend to produce greater velocities of 2900fps and slightly higher if pushed to maximum limits. Nevertheless, at 2800fps, the Accubond achieves relatively deep penetration without excessive weight loss. Wounding is best inside 2400fps or 250 yards and rather than a widely diffused violent wound, as occurs with the Partition, the 160 grain Accubond tends to produce more centralized wounding, not unlike the basic Remington Core-Lokt and Hi-Shok at moderate ranges. The 160 grain Accubond is not an exceptionally deep penetrator, in no way similar to the Barnes 140 grain TSX but on game weighing between 80 and 320kg (180-700lb), the Accubond is a good all round bullet.


Federal’s more recent invention, the 140 grain Fusion bullet is somewhat mild at 2990fps and having a poor BC of .390, loses velocity very quickly. The Fusion projectile is a core bonded design (perhaps even copper electro-plated) but is brittle in nature and prone to excessive (with regard to its design goals) weight loss during penetration. The Fusion bullet is slow to expand and on lighter animals, can fail to initiate hydrostatic shock at impact velocities of 2850fps yet cannot be expected to penetrate vitals from tail on shots on animals weighing 40kg (90lb). Federal would do well to drop this design and utilize their 150 grain Hotcor with cannelure, giving both better shock, deeper penetration and greater economy for end users.


Hornady, recognizing the need for high velocity .280 loadings have no listings in their custom line and instead feature two loadings in their light magnum line, now re-branded as Superformance. These include the 139 grain GMX at 3070fps and the 139 grain SST at 3090fps. Both loads achieve their stated velocity in 24” barrels, losing around 70fps in 22” barrels. The SST is a spectacular killer when driven at these velocities although it is best suited to lighter medium game, up to body weights of about 70kg (155lb) as a safe maximum. The GMX is quite the opposite, like the Barnes TSX, better suited to heavily muscled game if any error in shot placement is a possibility beyond 150 yards. It would be good to see Hornady offer the 154 grain SST and InterBond as a dual option for the .280 as both projectiles work extremely well from this cartridge platform.

Hand Loading


Although some of the most recent .280 factory loads deliver near maximum velocities, hand loading is still by far the most economical means of obtaining optimum performance from this cartridge.


Several factors determine velocity potential of the .280. As can be expected, short free bore, 22” barreled rifles can be much slower than longer barreled, long free bore rifles. From 22” barreled rifles, maximum safe working velocities include 3000fps with 140 grain bullets, 2900fps with 150 grain bullets and 2800fps with 160 grain bullets. Rifles with 24” barrels will normally give 50fps increase above these figures for 3050fps, 2950fps and 2850fps respectively.   


To some extent custom barreled .280 rifles are both more common and of greater popularity than factory rifles. SAAMI specifications give the .280 a relatively short free bore, ideal for the full range of bullet weights from 120 to 180 grains. But for those who wish to utilize bullets weighing between 150 and 180 grains, the SAAMI specification can be a handicap. It is therefore advisable, if custom building a .280 rifle for maximum down range energy, to have the free bore cut to a length suited to this application. That said, it is imperative to check magazine box lengths to see if a long COAL is actually workable.


A small selection of rifle actions with suitable box magazines for a long .280 include the Winchester long action M70 (all variants), Remington M700 Long, Sako long (internal magazine models) or the economical Howa Long action (Weatherby Vanguard). All of these rifles have internal box magazines greater than 90mm (3.5" ) in length. Barrels with a 1:9" twist rate are extremely versatile giving top accuracy with bullets weighing between 120 and 175 grains.


Good ‘dummy’ max COAL’s for chamber cutting include: the Hornady 154 or 162 grain Interlock seated to touch the rifle lands at 87mm or 154-162 grain InterBond or SST seated to touch at 89mm. A freebore cut to either of the above specs (both equate to the same COAL) works well with the 150 grain Scirocco, the full range of 160-175 grain hunting bullets and the 180 grain VLD. If the rifle is to be used for dedicated long range hunting with the 168 grain VLD or A-Max, a max COAL of 87.5mm is the most versatile. These COAL’s optimize case capacity based on a 1mm (40 thou) bullet jump. Those who prefer minimal bullet jump should shorten the above suggested max COAL’ accordingly.


From a long freebore, 26” barreled custom rifle, typical velocities include 3100fps with 140 grain bullets, 3000fps with 150 grain bullets, 2950fps with the 154 grain SST and InterBond, 2900fps with the 162 grain A-Max and SST, 2850fps with the 168 grain VLD and 2750fps using the 180 grain VLD. Long barreled .280 caliber rifles produce relatively low felt recoil, low recoil torque to bedding surfaces and a reduction in perceived noise.


Brass for the .280 Remington is readily available although cases are just as easily fire formed from .270Win brass. Optimum powders for 120 to 150 grain bullets or short free bore rifles are the medium slow burners in the ADI 2209 / H4350 range. Optimum burn rates for heavy bullets include powders in the ADI 2213sc / H4813sc range.  


The .280 can be loaded with light 120 to 130 grain bullets for use on varmints to light game however most 139-140 grain bullets give just as spectacular (usually more so) killing along with superior exterior ballistics. Nevertheless, where a light recoiling down load is required, the two most outstanding performers are the 120 grain Nosler ballistic Tip loaded to between 2700 and 2900fps and the 130 grain Sierra Single shot pistol loaded to 2700fps to 2800fps.


For the .280, the most useful range of Sierra projectiles include the 140 grain and 170 grain Pro-Hunter, the 140, 150, 160 and 175 grain GameKing bullets along with the 150 and 175 grain MatchKing bullets. Of these, the 150 and 160 grain GK are good open country medium game bullets, especially suited to hunters on a tight budget. The 150 grain bullet is ideally suited to goat/sheep while the 160 grain bullet is better suited to deer in the 70 to 120kg (154-264lb) range.

Sierra seem to have a knack of creating highly effective round nose bullets and the 170 grain Pro-hunter, although not a commonly used projectile, delivers excellent performance at close ranges on medium game.  The economical Pro-Hunter is far tougher than Hornady’s round nose bullets, a sometimes highly desirable feature considering the stress placed on a projectile with a wide frontal area and its exposed lead core on impact. The tough jacket and cannelure of the Sierra are effective at arresting bullet expansion during penetration. Naturally, the faster the Sierra is driven, the more spectacular the wounding although at full .280 velocities of 2700fps, penetration can be compromised if tail on shots on medium game weighing up to 80kg (180lb) are to be expected.

Sierra’s 175 grain GameKing projectile is too stout for fast killing of medium game at .280 velocities. The same can be said for the 150 and 175 grain MatchKing projectiles. About the only creature that can make the SMK work as a long range hunting projectile is the humble pig. A wild pig has a dense body to initiate bullet expansion but is not normally so heavy in the body as to be classed as a large heavy game species - although exceptions do of course frequently occur.


The Speer 145 grain Hotcor projectile works well in the .280 out to moderate ranges but is slightly handicapped by a low BC of .416. To counter this Speer produce a 145 grain BTSP which can be used in conjunction with the Hotcor. On lighter medium game, these two projectiles offer a unique level of performance, producing very fast killing and excellent penetration. It would be nice to see the 145 grain Hotcor permanently replaced by the 150 grain Hotcor with cannelure which Speer manufacture for Federal, along with the creation on a 150 grain BTSP counterpart.


The 160 grain Hotcor can sometimes prove too stout for fast killing of light or lean bodied animals at all velocity levels. Wounding is extremely violent at close ranges yet light animals will often run great distances before succumbing to blood loss. This projectile is especially well suited to game weighing between 80 and 150kg (180-330lb) and adequate for heavier game of up to 320kg, though not as reliable as the 160 grain Nosler Partition design. Nevertheless, this is a very good bullet for medium weight game and can be used in conjunction with the Speer 160 grain BTSP to increase flexibility.


The 160 grain Speer BTSP is an excellent longer range projectile for medium game. From a potential muzzle velocity of 2900fps, the BTSP disintegrates readily and is therefore not suitable for the large, heavily muscled animals such as Elk, more so at close ranges. This projectile comes into its own at impact velocities of between 2600 and 2200fps (170 to 410 yards) if it is to be used on a wide range of body weights. Wounding gradually begins to deteriorate as velocity approaches 2000fps (545 yards) but if bone is hit, killing can be very fast.


Nosler’s 140 grain Partition and Ballistic Tip are both adequate performers in the .280 however the best of the lightweights is the 140 grain Accubond ideally suited to lighter bodied medium game, up to a maximum body weight of 150kg (330lb) out to ranges of around 350 yards. The Nosler 150 grain Ballistic Tip is a good performer on light animals at extended ranges. This projectile is stouter than the Speer BTSP projectiles but delivers deep, broad wounding out to 350 yards. It is not the most flexible of projectiles but is versatile on all body weights up to around 70kg (155lb).

The Nosler 150 grain Partition produces a unique level of performance. Bullet weight and construction are ideal for medium weight deer species. For hunters having problems with slow killing at normal hunting ranges, the 150 grain Partition produces a benchmark level of violent wounding, adequate penetration and fast killing. This projectile is versatile over a wide range of body weights up to 180kg (400lb) down to impact velocities of 2200fps.

Of  the 160 grain Accubond and 160 grain Partition, the Partition is a far more violent projectile - a pity considering the excellent BC of the Accubond. Both are highly useful projectiles in the .280 Remington however to some extent, the former Partition design can sometimes prove to be the more dramatic killer of the two when either launched at lower than magnum velocities or at extended ranges, it really is an outstanding killer of both light and larger medium game. Both are adequate for use on Elk sized game although not quite as emphatic as the .300 Magnum/Nosler offerings. Neither projectile seems to out penetrate the other by an noticeable degree. A mention must also go to the 175 grain Partition, a fast expanding projectile producing deep penetration - aided by mild muzzle velocities when used in the .280.

Besides Nosler, Hornady produce some very useful projectiles, well suited to .280 velocities. Entry level projectiles include the 139 grain Interlock flat base and Interlock BTSP. Both are adequate light game bullets, certainly not as spectacular as Hornady’s more recent designs. Both the FBSP and BTSP are very soft, losing over 50% weight after impact. These projectiles are best suited to hunters on a limited budget.

The 139 grain SST and 139 grain InterBond are very useful together. Both have the same form factor and BC, in most instances shooting to the same POI out to all ranges. The .280 (and 7mm Rem Mag) wring maximum performance from the 139 grain SST/InterBond combination. The SST produces spectacular results on lean animals out to 375 yards (2400fps), maintaining broad internal wounding out to 480 yards (2200fps). Beyond this range kills can be very delayed if shoulder bones are not struck. That said, it is possible to push the use of this projectile out to 600 yards (2000fps) with quite acceptable results.

The 139 grain InterBond produces wide wounding and high shock at impact velocities above 2600fps (250 yards), gradually losing its ability to create wide, fast bleeding wounds as velocity approaches 2400fps (375 yards). At impact velocities of 2100fps, with rear lung shots on light or lean medium game, the InterBond is only able to expand to a frontal area diameter of approximately 10mm (.400”), producing lung wounds of a similar diameter. The InterBond is therefore much better suited to either close to moderate ranges or tough animals, in lieu of a heavy bullet and shift in POI.

The 154 grain flat base and 162 grain BTSP Interlock projectiles are both excellent lighter medium game projectiles. Although the 162 grain BTSP is designed to produce reliable penetration at magnum velocities, this projectile is not really suitable for heavily muscled, large medium game, regardless of the lower .280 velocities. Instead, this projectile really shines as an economical medium game bullet, doing its best work on animals weighing up to 80kg (180lb).

Hornady’s 154 grain SST and InterBond are another excellent combination. The InterBond should be annealed for best results (see 7mm Rem Mag) while the 154 grain SST does not show any noticeable improvements from this process. Both of these projectiles have a relatively high BC of .525 and from a muzzle velocity of 2950fps, the SST delivers excellent wounding out to 450 yards (2200fps) and much further if major bones are encountered to initiate expansion. The InterBond is most effective inside 320 yards (2400fps). These two projectiles are able to tackle a wide range of body weights and ranges, the SST is ideal for game weighing up to 90kg (200lb), the IB adequate for heavy bodied deer species such as Elk. The IB is similar in terminal performance to the 160 grain Accubond, regardless of differences in metallurgy and design.

The Hornady 162 grain SST can be made into quite a useful all round projectile once annealed. After this process, retained weight usually averages 50% which may not be very high however potential incidents of jacket core separation are eliminated. As with almost all 7mm projectiles, the 162 grain SST produces hydrostatic shock on medium game species at impact velocities of above 2600fps which in the .280 at up to 2900fps, equates to 175 yards. As with other SST designs, wide wounding occurs down to velocities of 2200fps (440 yards) however with rear lung shots, kills can be slightly delayed beyond the 2600fps barrier, becoming slower as velocity decreases. The 162 grain SST is particularly well suited to all body weights up to 150kg (330lb).

For long range hunting, the 162 grain Hornady A-Max is outstanding. Penetration on light bodied game at close ranges is thorough but on large animals, full cross body penetration (exit wounding) cannot be expected. As the A-Max breaks the 2600fps mark (200 yards), it comes into its own. The 162 grain A-Max adequately destroys the vitals of heavy bodied deer species such as Elk at extended ranges but is not quite as deep penetrating as either the 180 grain 7mm VLD or heavy .30 caliber A-Max and VLD projectiles.  The 162 grain A-Max is somewhat better suited to light to mid sized medium game if consistently satisfying results are to be expected.


From an MV of 2900fps, the A-Max produces very wide wounding out to 825 yards (1800fps), gradually decreasing in performance though still producing thorough wounding and clean killing at 1400fps (1200 yards). Generally speaking, for long range shooting, intermediate experienced shooters tend to have less wind drift errors at velocities above 1800fps. Below 1800fps, a far greater level of skill is required in order to read wind correctly and place shots accurately.

One projectile that deserves consideration is the Swift 150 grain Scirocco. This is a sleek bullet with a high BC of .515 along with a bullet weight suited to a huge range of the worlds most common game species (goat/sheep/deer/antelope). The Scirocco looks entirely different to the 154 grain InterBond yet both have near identical wounding characteristics, the annealed IB being slightly superior with regard to penetration. Nevertheless, the Scirocco, driven at 3000fps, stays above the 2600fps mark out to 225 yards and continues to produce a highly traumatic wound out at 300 yards. The Scirocco is particularly good for light yet tough animals within these ranges. Swift also manufacture 140, 160 and 175 grain A-Frame bullets, the latter 160 and 175 grain projectiles producing excellent performance on large medium game out to moderate ranges of 250 yards.

The .280 can drive the Barnes range of TSX projectiles at high velocities yet the light 120 grain TSX and Tipped TSX are the best choice for this cartridge when used on lean bodied deer. The 120 grain TTSX driven at 3300fps, is most effective out to 250 yards (2600fps). For those who can read winds, the 120 grain TTSX driven forwards into shoulder bones, continues to produce wide wounding and fast killing out to 330 yards (2400fps). Beyond this velocity barrier, wounding is narrower than that which can be achieved with a frangible projectile. The 140, 150 and 160 grain TSX are more suited to game weighing over 90kg (200lb) and all three will produce exit wounds on game weighing up to 320kg (700lb). The 160 and 175 grain TSX are adequate for head and neck shooting large heavy game if necessity dictates that the .280 must be used.


Berger produce three long range hunting bullets for the 7mm bore, the 140 grain VLD, 168 grain VLD and 180 grain VLD. Of these, the 168 grain VLD is the most useful in the .280 Remington, obtaining a balance of high velocity, high BC and SD and excellent terminal performance at extended ranges. The 168 grain VLD has a low surface bearing area and is relatively easy to work with when looking for maximum muzzle velocities combined with optimum accuracy. In many cases this bullet can be pushed as fast or even slightly faster than a 160 grain bullet.

Like the A-Max, the 168 grain VLD is best suited to light to mid weight deer species. The major difference between the A-Max and the VLD, is that the VLD tends to (but not always), break down into smaller fragments than the A-Max. The 168 grain VLD has slightly greater potential to produce shallow penetration if used at close range on large bodied game however, using the VLD in this way, works against its strengths. At very close ranges, neck and head shots on large bodied game eliminate undesirable results. As velocities approach 2600fps (around 175 yards), the 168 grain VLD boasts spectacular performance.  Exit wounds on light to mid weight game are often up to above 3” in diameter (as also happens at point blank ranges on lean bodied game).

The 180 grain VLD bullet can be driven at around 2700-2750fps in standard configuration 24” barreled .280 rifles. From custom 26-27” long range hunting rifle barrels, the 180 grain VLD can be pushed to 2850fps (full 32” target barrels can comfortably achieve 2950fps). Unfortunately,  the 2011 orange box VLD needs to hit bone to prevent pin hole wounding at long ranges. Hopefully, Berger will produce a more frangible 180 grain VLD duplicating the original bullet in the future. If this can be achieved, regardless of whether the 180 grain bullet is driven at 2700fps or 2850fps, the VLD will once again be an exceptional performer down to 1400fps across an immensely wide range of body weights.


One common chambering for custom rifles is the .280 Ackley improved. This pushes the shoulder forwards to 40 degrees and minimizes body taper. The Ackley improved is sometimes quoted as giving a 100fps gain in velocity over the standard cartridge. In some instances, the higher velocity comes more as a result of maximum loading. Those who are contemplating the AI version, to avoid disappointment, should not expect velocity gains of more than 50fps. One of the greater benefits of the Ackley is minimizing case growth and the need for trimming, especially useful for hand loaders using progressive reloading operations such as the Hornady Lock N Load reloading station.

Closing Comments


The .280 Remington is an outstanding medium game cartridge. While the popularity of this cartridge has always remained limited in mainstream hunting circles, the .280 is a popular choice among custom rifle builders. The only trap is that because of its excellent exterior ballistics, many hand loaders have a tendency to want to push this performance further, to 7mm Remington Magnum velocities. If a given rifle cannot produce optimum desired velocities without excessive pressure, the hunter must come to terms with the fact that they may need to move to a more powerful cartridge. The .280 can be built with a long barrel and long free bore to produce both high velocity and low recoil, however it does have its velocity limitations, not weaknesses, but limitations.


As a long range medium game hunting cartridge, the .280 is limited by the abilities of the shooter to read wind more so than any limitation of cartridge wounding power. The same can be said of the 7mm-08, both cartridges have the capacity to produce broad wounding out to considerable ranges.

The .280 cannot produce wounds as wide as the larger bores when used on large heavily built game. Shot placement and bullet selection are as always, key factors when using the .280 on large body weights.

Suggested loads: .280 Remington Barrel length:24”, 26”

No ID Sectional Density Ballistic Coefficient Observed  MV Fps ME

Ft-lb’s

1 FL Rem 140gr Core-Lokt .248 .390 2930 2668

2 FL 139gr SST Superf .246 .486 3090 2946

3 HL 154gr SST/IB .273 .525 2900 2875

4 HL 160gr Partition .283 .475 2850 2885

5 HL 162gr A-Max .287 .625 2850 2921

6 HL 162gr A-Max .287 .625 2920 3067  

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths

1 Yards 100 150 260 300 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -5.6 -8.6 -12 -16

2 Yards 100 150 286 330 350 375 400 425

Bt. path +3 +3.8 0 -3 -5.1 -7.8 -10.8 -14.2

3 Yards 100 150 265 305 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4.8 -7.5 -10.6 -14.1

4 Yards 100 150 257 297 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.5 0 -3 -5.9 -8.8 -12.2 -16

5 Yards 100 150 264 305 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4.9 -7.5 -10.6 -14

6 Yards 100 150 272 312 325 350 375 400

Bt. path +3 +3.6 0 -3 -4 -6.5 -9.4 -12.6  

No At yards 10mphXwind Velocity Ft-lb’s

1 300 7.7 2249 1573

2 300 5.6 2516 1954

3 300 5.6 2388 1949

4 300 6.4 2293 1868

5 300 4.7 2420 2107

6 300 4.6 2484 2219  




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Reloading Podcast 252 - you going to coat that

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking powder coating vs HiTek and other things.

  1. In the AR-15 platform, could loads that are too light cause doubles?

  2. Joe Commesso posted in RLPG MeWe: Is anyone hitting 150 yards consistently with a 45 Colt lever action rifle?

  3. Russ Harrison posted in RLPG MeWe: Travis mentioned on the last live cast that he preferred powder coating over HiTek coated. I shoot the HiTek coated Acme bullets. What is the difference between the two coatings? I also presumed that they were the same thing.

    1. https://www.powderbuythepound.com/



  1. Paul Lowd posted in RLPG FB: Lyman has apparently decided to jump into the progressive press market.





Cartridge corner: The 204 Ruger was developed from the .222 Remington Magnum, which has the second largest case capacity in the family that began with the .222 Remington.[3] Only the European 5.6×50mm Magnum is larger, which itself is a lengthened version of the 222 Remington Magnum. The 222 Remington Magnum provides about 5% more usable (below the neck) case capacity than the most popular member of the family, the NATO 5.56×45mm (.223 Remington). To make the 204 Ruger, the 222 Remington Magnum case was necked down to .204 inches (5 mm) and shoulder moved forward and angle increased to 30 degrees.[4] Bullets available in .204 caliber range from 24 to 55 grains (1.55517g to 3.56g).[5] The Hornady factory load is listed at 4,225 ft/s (1288 m/s) with a 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet.[6] To achieve these velocities, the factory uses a proprietary powder composition known internally as SMP746, specially formulated by Primex, and not currently (2013) available to handloaders. The propellant features a de-coppering agent that helps prevent fouling. Reloading data from Hornady, using commercially available powders, indicate velocity peaking at just under 4,200 ft/s (1,300 m/s) with the 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet in longer barrels. Many AR-15 rifle manufacturers now offer the .204 Ruger as an alternative chambering alongside the usual 5.56×45mm/.223 Rem.

The .204 Ruger was the second Ruger-named cartridge produced by a partnership between Ruger and Hornady, the first being the big bore .480 Ruger revolver cartridge introduced in 2003 for the Super Redhawk. With the backing of a major gunmaker and a major ammunition company, the round was an instant success, with other ammunition makers and firearms makers quickly adding the new chambering. Ruger's initial offerings included the bolt action Model 77 MKII, and the single shot Ruger No. 1, and Hornady offered loadings with 30-and-40-grain (1.9 and 2.6 g) bullets.

The .204 Ruger has proven to be a very accurate and efficient cartridge: an early tester reported 1/2 MOA groups at 100 yards (91 m) with the Hornady loads and a Ruger #1 Varmint rifle. This is not surprising, considering that the first cartridge in the family, the .222 Remington, was a top benchrest shooting cartridge for many years after its introduction.

The .204 Ruger was intended primarily for varmint rifles, which require bullets with flat trajectories but not much mass or kinetic energy. The .204 was "splitting the difference" between the popular .224 varmint rounds such as the .220 Swift and .22-250 Remington, and the tiny .172 caliber rounds such as the .17 Remington and the .17 HMR. The resulting cartridge provides somewhat higher velocities than any of these, giving a maximum point blank range of more than 270 yards (250 m).

Velocity[edit]

Ruger's claim to being the velocity king with the .204 was based on two points.

First, no other high performance 20 caliber cartridge was commercially produced. Second, the ammunition used to achieve the 4225 ft/s was available only from Hornady using a special powder not available to the general public.[7]

Note that handloaders typically achieve velocities more in the area of 4,100 ft/s (1,200 m/s) using a 32-grain (2.1 g) bullet.[8]

Note also that handloads using a 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet in other commercial cartridges such as the .22-250 Remington also achieve velocities similar to those of the .204 Ruger. The advantage of the .204 Ruger is that it achieves these velocities with less powder, less recoil, and less heat than the larger cartridges. The 204 Ruger has a maximum range of approximately 500 yards (460 m).

Hornady now offers a 24-grain lead free cartridge that claims 4400 fps from a 26" barrel.[9] However, Hornady's 35 gr NTX .22-250 claims 4450 fps from a 24" barrel.

.204 Ruger 32 GR V-MAX 83204

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

4225/1268

3645/944

3137/699

2683/512

2272/367

1899/256

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

0.6

0.00

-4.1

-13.1

-29.0


.204 Ruger 40 GR V-MAX 83206

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

3900/1351

3482/1077

3103/855

2755/674

2433/526

2133/404

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

0.7

0.00

-4.3

-13.2

-28.1


.204 Ruger 45 GR SP 83208

Muzzle

100 yd

200 yd

300 yd

400 yd

500 yd

Velocity/Energy

(fps) / (ft-lbs)

3625/1313

3188/1015

2792/778

2428/589

2093/438

1787/319

Trajectory (inches)

-1.5

1.0

0.0

-5.5

-16.9

-36.3



Type

Rifle

Place of origin

USA

Production history

Designer

Ruger/Hornady

Designed

2004

Produced

2004–Present

Specifications

Parent case

.222 Remington Magnum

Case type

Rimless, bottleneck

Bullet diameter

.204 in (5.2 mm)

Neck diameter

.2311 in (5.87 mm)

Shoulder diameter

.3598 in (9.14 mm)

Base diameter

.3764 in (9.56 mm)

Rim diameter

.378 in (9.6 mm)

Rim thickness

.0449 in (1.14 mm)

Case length

1.850 in (47.0 mm)

Overall length

2.2598 in (57.40 mm)

Rifling twist

1-12

Primer type

small rifle

Ballistic performance




Bullet mass/type

Velocity

Energy


32 gr. (2.1 g) BT

4,225 ft/s (1,288 m/s)

1,268 ft⋅lbf (1,719 J)

40 gr. (2.6 g) BT

3,900 ft/s (1,200 m/s)

1,351 ft⋅lbf (1,832 J)

45 gr. (2.9 g) SP

3,625 ft/s (1,105 m/s)

1,313 ft⋅lbf (1,780 J)

40 gr. (2.6 g) Hornady V-Max, Norma

3,806 ft/s (1,160 m/s)

1,195 ft⋅lbf (1,620 J)


Source(s): Hornady[1] Norma[2]



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Reloading Podcast 251 - does that trimmer really work

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about trimmers.

  1. Still new to reloading and I am limited on space for all my equipment. What is your opinion on the lee case trimmers? I am working on saving the money for a case prep center. Not sure if you have done a podcast on trimmers. Thank you Chris

  2. I just purchased a new tikka t3x rifle in 6.5creedmoor. I also purchased 50 new Peterson brass in LR primer pocket. I started load development with two different powders; reloader 16 and reloader 17. This is my second 6.5creedmoor so this caliber isn’t new to reloading for me. I use Redding competition shell holders and national match die set.  Bullet: 143eldx Reloader 17 has a max charge of 41.4 grains in the hornady 10th. I started out with 40.2gr of reloader 17 and moved up to 42.4gr in .2 gr increments. I noticed a very slight ejector mark (mostly visable and couldn’t feel with finger nail) starting at 40.2gr with a velocity of only 2640fps. I kept moving forward as there is no way this seemed correct. The next piece at 40.4 showed no mark. Went through the rest and some showed slight marks and some didn’t all the way up to 42.4. Next I started with reloader 16 at 41.6gr and worked my way up to 44.0gr. Noticing similar results, but no ejector marks until about 42.6gr. Bouncing back and forth between .2gr increments showing slight pressure signs via ejector mark. Nothing extensive, just slight when it showed until I got to 44gr. 44gr showed a mark that could be felt via finger nail, albeit not extreme, but noticeable. There is no load data for this bullet but there is plenty data regarding 140 and 142gr bullets on Alliant a website, which is how I can up with my starting charge. Max for 142gr sierra match king is 43.9gr.Sorry for the long winded email. The whole reason for this long email is frustration. Why do some cases show pressure signs lower on powder charge, but other higher on powder charge not show pressure? Before anyone asks, I full length resized the new brass. Could this be a brass issue? Thanks for any input, Jon Sorry I forgot to add that I’m seating to 2.900” and this eldx touches that lands at 2.925” I’m also using a standard cci 200 primer

  3. Spent Primers posted in RLPG MeWe: Moving again! New house, new reloading room. Fresh 9.5x12 foot, air conditioned canvas. Should I yank the carpet? I reload rifle, pistol and shotshell but am clean and careful. What do ya'll think?





Cartridge corner: 44 Special


This week’s source is Wikipedia, again, because Jim couldn’t find the cartridge in Ballistic Studies...


The .44 Special or .44 S&W Special is a smokeless powder center fire metallic revolver cartridge developed by Smith & Wesson in 1907 as the standard chambering for their New Century revolver, introduced in 1908.


Development history

On the late 19th century American frontier, large .44- and .45-caliber cartridges were considered the epitome of handgun ammunition for self-protection, home defense, and hunting. Black-powder rounds such as the .44 American, .44 Russian, .44-40 Winchester, and .45 Colt enjoyed a well-earned reputation for effective terminal ballistics, accuracy, and reliability.[4]


At the start of the 20th century, Smith & Wesson decided to celebrate by introducing a brand new revolver design which they called the New Century.[5]


Smith & Wesson wished to pair their new revolver design with a worthy new ammunition chambering.[5] At the time, smokeless powder was state of the art in ammunition technology. Older black-powder ammunition was in the process of being converted to smokeless. Smith & Wesson's popular .44 Russian cartridge had established a reputation for superb accuracy and was a renowned target load, and they decided to use an improved smokeless powder version as the basis for the new round. Due to the lower energy density of the early semi-smokeless powders, prior efforts to convert the .44 Russian to smokeless had produced less than stellar ballistic performance. Smith & Wesson addressed this issue by lengthening the .44 Russian cartridge case by 0.190-inch (4.8 mm) and increasing the powder capacity by 6 grains (0.39 g).[6] The resulting design, which S&W called the .44 Special, had a case length of 1.16-inch (29 mm).[5]


Ballistics

Unfortunately the ballistics of the new cartridge merely duplicated the 246-grain (15.9 g) bullet @ 755 ft/s statistics of the .44 Russian, when the powder capacity of its case would have supported performance rivaling that of the .45 Colt and close to the .44-40. Nevertheless, the .44 Special retained its progenitor's reputation for accuracy.[3]



Black Powder Factory Cartridges c 1907-20[7]

The SAAMI maximum pressure standard for the 44 SW special is 15,500 PSI.[8]


The .44 Associates


Keith Semi-Wadcutter Hollow Point developed by Elmer Keith/Harold Croft c 1929-31

Almost from its introduction, firearms enthusiasts and cartridge handloaders saw that the potential of the .44 Special chambering was far from being realized and by the end of the 1920s were loading it to much higher velocities than factory standards.[5] Led by articles in firearms periodicals penned by gun writers such as Elmer Keith and Skeeter Skelton, a loose cadre of enthusiastic fans who called themselves the ".44 Associates" formed.[5] Trading information such as .44 Special handloading data and tips regarding the conversion of revolvers to .44 caliber, they promulgated the belief espoused by many firearms authorities and experts that the .44 Special chambering is one of the best overall in the handguns.[4][5][9][10]


Currently a variety of factory ammunition loadings are available in .44 Special, including bullet weights of 135, 165, 180, 200, 240, 246, and 250 grains (16 g) at various velocity levels.[14] Special high performance terminal ballistic loads are also offered, such as the Hornady JHP, Winchester Silvertip JHP, Speer Gold Dot JHP, Federal LHP, Cor-Bon JHP, and various other jacketed hollow point and soft point designs.


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Reloading Podcast 250 - I Feel the Need for Speed

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about a load going a mile a second.

  1. A mile a second, huh?

LFD Research


Project Appleseed


Cartridge corner: 300 Remington Ultra Magnum

.300 Remington Ultra Magnum

History


In 1913 Charles Newton introduced the world’s first high capacity .30 caliber cartridge, based on the 11.2mm Mauser cartridge necked down to .30 caliber. Newton’s cartridge was initially named the .30 Adolph Express after New York rifle builder Fred Adolph but later renamed as the .30 Newton. Case capacity of the .30 Newton was in every way similar to the modern 7mm, .308 Norma and .338 Winchester magnum cartridges however the Newton cartridge did not feature a belted case head. Unfortunately, Charles Newton was plagued with troubles in business. His cartridges never truly saw the light of day and with the introduction of the .300 H&H in 1925, the .30 Newton faded into history.

By the late 1980’s a more informed shooting public was now well aware that a powerful cartridge did not need a belted case. Belted cases may have been handy for wildcat case forming operations and indeed, the belted magnums had proven to be winners at 1000 yards. However the belt no longer served the purpose that it was designed for with the heavily tapered H&H cartridge designs and it’s more recent role as a marketing ploy, the belted case head had run its course.

The 1980’s saw Aubrey White and Noburo Uno of North American Shooting Systems (NASS), based in British Columbia Canada, begin the development of magnum capacity cartridges based on the .404 Jeffery’s Nitro Express. By 1995, basing his designs on the formed brass purchased from Noburo Uno, Don Allen of Dakota Arms had designed a full line of non belted 2.5” case length magnum proprietary cartridges for his Dakota rifles. At the same time, cartridge and rifle designer John Lazzeroni was developing a line of prototype cartridges which later became a line of both long 2.788” magnums and short 2.030” magnums.

In 1999 Remington released the .300 Remington Ultra magnum based loosely on the 404 Jeffery case design. The creation of the .300 Remington Ultra Magnum circumvented the proprietary status from the existing .404 based cartridges while spawning major competition with Winchester.  A main feature of both the Remington and Winchester magnums was a rebated rim, allowing these cartridges to work with existing magnum bolt faces. Remington's initial factory loading for the .300 RUM (discontinued) featured the 180gr Nosler Partition at an advertised 3300fps from a 26” barrel. These figures for the 180 grain bullet weight were later revised to 3250fps.

The .300 RUM quickly gained popularity with hunters throughout the western world. A powerful cartridge, producing impressively fast kills on light through to large medium game at close to exceedingly long ranges, this cartridge was for many, an introduction to the idea of long range hunting. Nevertheless, the .300 RUM was not without its idiosyncrasies. Excessive barrel wear, high operating costs, excessive recoil and other contributing factors put the .300 RUM into the same class as high performance race engines. For many hunters, these negative factors have become a major detraction. What was once a love affair with a potent .30 caliber magnum becomes a divorce within 600 rounds. Regardless of this, the .300 RUM is still enjoyed for its strengths by a wide range of hunters with differing needs and will most likely continue to retain a great deal of popularity for decades to come. Of the small bores, the .300 RUM is a true powerhouse.

Performance


The strengths of the .300 RUM can be found in its ability to drive long, heavy .30 caliber projectiles at immensely high velocities. The RUM can launch 180 grain bullets at over 3300fps and 200-210 grain bullets at 3100fps and faster.  This power can essentially be utilized in two ways.

On large bodied medium game weighing around 90kg (200lb) and up to 400kg (880lb) and using controlled expanding projectiles, the .300 Rum can be utilized to deliver extremely traumatic wounding within ordinary hunting ranges, effecting the fastest possible, humane kills.

Using long for caliber, fast expanding or frangible projectiles, the .300 RUM can be used as a highly effective long range hunting cartridge for all game up to maximum body weights of around 400kg (880lb).   

The ability to produce fast killing on medium to large bodied game weighing between 90kg and 320kg (200-700lb) gives the .300 (and other 300 magnums) an advantage over the 7mm RUM (as well as other 7mm magnums). The science involved is rather straight forwards once it is fully understood but requires careful consideration and study in order to achieve this understanding.

Ahead is a basic example and description of incidents of killing, comparing the 7mm RUM to the .300 RUM with relevant factors in chronological order:

150kg (330lb) deer.

7mm RUM (and magnum family).

Range inside 300 yards.

Conventional soft point (Interlock / Gameking), SST or A-Max of 160-162 grains.

Bullet impacts chest but meets so much resistance that not enough energy is available for the production of hydrostatic shock.

Animal stays standing or runs, time to death around 45 seconds.

Inspection of carcass reveals internal wounding was excellent, vitals destroyed.

150kg (330lb) deer.

300 RUM  (and magnum family).

Range inside 300 yards.

Conventional soft point (Interlock / Gameking), SST or A-Max of 180-208 grains.

Bullet impacts chest, produces hydrostatic shock, instant coma, followed by death.

Inspection of carcass reveals internal wounding was excellent, vitals destroyed

Please refer to the game killing section for more detailed information on the exact mechanics of hydrostatic shock, an often misunderstood term.

In the example just given, the .300 RUM produced immensely fast killing in comparison to the sevens. Nevertheless, this does not mean that the same 30 caliber projectiles will give the same results on light bodied deer. Regardless of the power of the .300 RUM, projectiles such as the 180 grain GameKing and Prohunter can produce delayed killing on light framed game by having too much momentum (bullet construction), not meeting enough resistance on impact, resulting in a lack of hydrostatic shock. As always, bullet weights and bullet construction must be matched to the job at hand. Again, referring to the example given, a change to the 160 grain Partition in the 7mm Magnum would have effected immediate collapse of the 150kg animal.

The .300 RUM most definitely has negative aspects. Excessive throat wear is a problem and can occur very quickly. If a rifle is shot in strings for practice, the early signs of accuracy loss can be seen in as little as 300 rounds. With care and attention to barrel heat, friction prevention and bore finish, optimum accuracy can be maintained for approximately 600 rounds. With great care, barrel life can be extended further, for up to 900 rounds. This 600 to 900 round figure is perhaps the most sound barrel budget, but again, bore care and shooting habits are key factors. With cleaning procedures, one could easily reason that the less abrasives used on an already fast wearing abrased bore the better. But the opposite is true, constant polishing prevents the barrel steel at the throat of the RUM’s from becoming porous.

Heated arguments do occur regarding barrel life of the RUM’s. Readers are in this regard asked to consider how such factors as lubricants, polishing methods, barrel steel, barrel contour and shooting strings can effect results. Yet another factor is how shooters define acceptable accuracy. While one shooter may find .75MOA acceptable, another may find this level of accuracy abysmal for long range shooting. When all of these factors are taken into consideration, one can see how easily barrel life results can vary from rifle to rifle and from shooter to shooter.

Remington utilize extremely long free bore to achieve high velocities in the RUM’s. This free bore acts as a gas expansion chamber, allowing for a long peak pressure wave. The .300 RUM uses up to .400” free bore, dictated by the available internal magazine lengths of typical magnum action rifles. In custom rifles, the magazines of the Winchester and Remington rifles can be altered to partially alleviate this potential problem thanks to the Wyatt Outdoors extended magazine box. But in standard form, the shooter can only experiment with ammunition and projectile brands and hope that a given projectile will enter the rifling squarely rather than off center and produce desirable accuracy.  

Generally speaking, the longer the projectile, the more it can be guided into the rifling squarely by the RUM case neck. Some rifles do produce desirable accuracy with lighter weight projectiles, experimentation and realistic expectations are the key.

A third negative factor of the .300 RUM is the immense recoil however this can be tamed via muzzle brakes. In unbraked rifles, a weight of 10.5lb field ready is about the minimum for which an experienced shooter can expect consistency of POI at long ranges, requiring sound shooting techniques and sturdy sling tensions as recoil inertia is still evident. Brakes for the .300 RUM should be side ported, rather than spiral ported, the latter having the potential to throw ground debris into the shooters face and across the rifle action unless a ground mat is used.

The velocities of the .300RUM can place extreme demands on projectiles, requiring stout construction for close range impact as well as fast expansion for longer range shots. The higher the impact velocity, the greater the target resistance, resulting in increased stress placed on projectiles. Again, matching bullet weights and bullet construction to game body weights and range is the key to success.

Like all .300 magnums, the .300 RUM is not designed for use on large dangerous game. When used on heavy game, as is reiterated throughout these texts, neck shots followed by head shots (head shots if range and conditions permit) produce the fastest, safest kills.

As with many cartridge designs, the .300 RUM has both its strengths and weaknesses. The trick is being able to understand and work to its strengths, exploiting the full potential of the available power. A high level of personal discipline is required to accurately shoot a stout recoiling magnum along with a sound rifle platform. To be sure, a .300 RUM rifle that groups 1.5” at 100 yards is far less effective in the field than a .308 Winchester that groups .5”.


300 RUM article



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Reloading Podcast 249 - You can't shoot cast in that.

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking cast bullets in Glocks.

  1. Hi guys. Long time listener and I greatly appreciate what you all bring to the shooting community. My question is about loading 9mm. I’ve been reloading 45 acp for years. I enjoy it, find it relaxing, and have developed loads for specific pistols for accuracy and function. Just purchased a Glock 19 gen 5 and was wondering if it’s worth reloading 9mm for it. Cost is not a deciding factor, but more so my confusion on their marksman barrel. Research tells me folks are scared of reloading lead cast for Glock’s, and of course Glock says no way. I think most of these concerns are for folks that don’t clean their barrels after every trip. Is it worth reloading 9mm any more?  And if so, as long as I am careful and work up loads properly, and clean my barrels after every trip, any reason not to use reloads in a Glock gen5? Any input would be great. Many thanks. John

  2. Hey guys, just got my first press(simple L-n-L classic) and I just cleaned a bunch of brass that I’ve been collecting(my own) for a year now. I’m wondering, I may not reload for a week or so, should I lube after it’s dried from cleaning, or wait till I’m actually going to load? Thanks. Will P.S. Every one of you are nuts and you need to go daily! WE NEED YOU!!!!





Cartridge corner: 25-35 WCF

Cartridge Type: Rifle

Height: 2.043"

Width: 0.506"

Average FPS: 2230

Average Energy: 1292

Average Gr: 117

Recoil: 1.18

Power Rank: 2.61 of 20

The .25-35 Winchester Center Fire (WCF) was designed in 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever action rifle. The parent case is a large rifle primer based off the .30-30 with a .258 inch (6.6mm) round. The ballistic performance based off four grain type of velocities for a 24" barrel are 3,026 ft/s (60 gr), 2,815 ft/s (75 gr), 1,513 ft/s (90 gr), and 2,357 ft/s (117 gr).

Production on the .25-35 WCF cartridge ceased after 1940, but Winchester reintroduced it in 2005 just before the company ran into financial trouble. Browning picked up the rights to manufacture rifles for the .25-35 WCF under the Winchester name, and commercial factory loaded rounds are still available. Handloading brass/rounds are available from dealers such as Sierra, Hornady, along with Mt. Baldy Bullet Company.

The .25-35 WCF can kill medium sized game up to 100 yards distance and small game up to 200 yards distance. It is better suited as a small game or varmint hunting rifle when using commercial rounds. Hand loading rounds have been able to produce higher velocity shots with deeper penetrating wounds on targets further out than 100 yards.



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Reloading Podcast 248 - It's Phil's Fault

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering questions about not normal bullet weights.

  1. Hey guys, been listening to the show for a long time. You fellas do a great job at getting out good information while keeping it entertaining, as long as you can keep the old man awake that is. Keep up the good work and the friendly jabs.  How do you guys recommend loading bullets you don't have data for?  I'm shooting 357 Maximum and have great luck with the speed 180g hot cores but would like to try some of lehigh defense bullets. I've loaded both the 105g controlled fracturing and the 140g extreme penetrator in regular 357 magnum and have had good luck on both coyotes and deer (respectively). I'll be shooting these out of a TC Contender by the way. While lehigh publishes data for these bullets in 357 magnum they don't have data for 357 maximum. How do I go about using those lighter monolithic bullets in my max?

    1. Bonus data, I was able to run my loads through a magneto speed. I don't have my spreadsheet with me but out of a 16.5" barrel the 180g speer hot cores were cranking out at 1770 fps (in a maximum case) while the 357 magnum loads were 1780 for 140g and 2210 for the 105g. Thanks, Sean M

  2. Hello all... loading 44 mag and I'm needing some piece of mind with a question that's bugging me....Book says shot out of 8 inch barrel should be 1340 fps, when I shoot out of 18inch Henry big boy.  I get 1560fps average. I fully understand faster velocity for barrel length. But my question is does it change pressure or is pressure consistent with load data no matter barrel length? HogHead

  3. I have seating depth question for my 458 Socom loading. I have had a lot of success reloading and making accurate and reliable rounds from all the information I can collect. I have the Barnes 300gr TTSX and Lehigh Defense 300gr match. Very similar CNC copper bullet and load data created for both by Western Powders. The Barnes data seats the bullet 0.100 deeper in the case and 34.07 gr of Reloader 7 at 98% case fill producing 4.45 FPS more velocity per grain of powder. Lehigh bullet data load is a lot more powder to compacting the load and slower. What’s your opinion on reducing OAL of the Lehigh bullet to match the Barnes seating depth and powder load to produce similar velocity with the lower charge? Patrick H



Cartridge corner: American firearms manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company introduced the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in 1887.[4] The round owes its origin to the .22 BB Cap of 1845 and the .22 Short of 1857. It combined the casing of the .22 Long of 1871 with the 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet of the .22 Extra Long of 1880, giving it a longer overall length, a higher muzzle velocity and superior performance as a hunting and target round, rendering both the .22 Long and .22 Extra Long cartridges obsolete. The .22 LR uses a heeled bullet, which means that the bullet is the same diameter as the case, and has a narrower "heel" portion that fits in the case. It is one of the few cartridges that are accepted by a large variety of rifles and handguns.

Popularity in the United States[edit]

The .22 LR cartridge is popular among novice shooters and experts alike. Its minimal recoil and relatively low noise make it an ideal cartridge for recreational shooting, small-game hunting, and pest control. .22 LR cadet rifles are commonly used by military cadets and others for basic firearms and marksmanship training. It is used by the Boy Scouts in the United States for the rifle shooting merit badge.[5]

The low recoil of the cartridge makes it ideal for introductory firearms courses. Novice shooters can be surprised or frightened by the noise and recoil of more powerful rounds. Beginners shooting firearms beyond their comfort level frequently develop a habit of flinching in an attempt to counter anticipated recoil. The resulting habit impedes correct posture and follow-through at the most critical phase of the shot and is difficult to correct. With high recoil eliminated, other errors in marksmanship technique are easier to identify and correct.

Available for this round are AR-15 upper receivers and M1911 slide assemblies. Many handgun manufacturers have an upper pistol conversion kit to make it shoot .22 LR ammunition. These conversions allow shooters to practice inexpensively while retaining the handling characteristics of their chosen firearms (with reduced recoil and muzzle blast). Additionally, .22 LR cartridge conversion kits allow practice at indoor ranges which prohibit high-power firearms. Owners of guns that use gas systems, such as AR-15 sport style rifles, normally avoid firing non-jacketed .22 LR cartridge ammunition, as the use of unjacketed ammunition may cause lead-fouling of the gas-port inside the barrel and costly gunsmithing procedures.

A wide variety of .22 LR ammunition is available commercially, and the available ammunition varies widely both in price and performance. Bullet weights among commercially available ammunition range from 20 to 60 grains (1.3 to 3.9 g), and velocities vary from 575 to 1,750 ft/s (175 to 533 m/s). .22 LR is the least costly cartridge ammunition available.[6] Promotional loads for plinking can be purchased in bulk for significantly less cost than precision target rounds. The low cost of ammunition has a substantial effect on the popularity of the .22 LR. For this reason, rimfire cartridges are commonly used for target practice.

.22 LR cartridges are commonly packaged in boxes of 50 or 100 rounds, and is often sold by the 'brick', a carton containing either 10 boxes of 50 rounds or loose cartridges totaling 500 rounds, or the 'case' containing 10 bricks totaling 5,000 rounds. Annual production is estimated by some at 2–2.5 billion rounds.[7][8] The NSSFestimates that a large percentage of the US production of 10 billion cartridges is composed of .22 LR.[9] Despite the high production figures there have occasionally been shortages of .22 LR cartridge in the continental United States, most notably during the 2008–13 United States ammunition shortage.

Performance[edit]

Two .22 LR rounds compared to a .45 ACP cartridge

Performance depends on barrel length and the type of action. For example, it will often perform differently in a bolt-action rifle than in a semiautomatic rifle. The .22 LR is effective to 150 yd (140 m), though practical ranges tend to be less. After 150 yd, the ballistics of the round are such that it will be difficult to compensate for the large "drop". The relatively short effective range, low report, and light recoil has made it a favorite for use as a target-practice cartridge. The accuracy of the cartridge is good, but not exceptional; various cartridges are capable of the same or better accuracy. A contributing factor in rifles is the transition of even a high-velocity cartridge projectile from supersonic to subsonic within 100 yd (91 m). As the bullet slows, the shock wave caused by supersonic travel overtakes the bullet and can disrupt its flight path, causing minor but measurable inaccuracies.

When zeroed for 100 yd (91 m), the arc-trajectory of the standard high-velocity .22 LR with a 40-gr bullet has a 2.7-inch (69 mm) rise at 50 yd (46 m), and a 10.8-inch (27 cm) drop at 150 yd (140 m).[10] A .22 LR rifle needs to be zeroed for 75 yd (69 m) to avoid overshooting small animals like squirrels at intermediate distances.[10]

As a hunting cartridge, rimfires are mainly used to kill small game up to the size of coyotes.[11] Although proper shot placement can kill larger animals such as deer or hog,[12] it is not recommended because its low power may not guarantee a humane kill.[13] The largest recorded animal killed with a .22 long caliber rifle was a grizzly bear in 1953.[14]

American firearms manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company introduced the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in 1887.[4] The round owes its origin to the .22 BB Cap of 1845 and the .22 Short of 1857. It combined the casing of the .22 Long of 1871 with the 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet of the .22 Extra Long of 1880, giving it a longer overall length, a higher muzzle velocity and superior performance as a hunting and target round, rendering both the .22 Long and .22 Extra Long cartridges obsolete. The .22 LR uses a heeled bullet, which means that the bullet is the same diameter as the case, and has a narrower "heel" portion that fits in the case. It is one of the few cartridges that are accepted by a large variety of rifles and handguns.

Popularity in the United States[edit]

The .22 LR cartridge is popular among novice shooters and experts alike. Its minimal recoil and relatively low noise make it an ideal cartridge for recreational shooting, small-game hunting, and pest control. .22 LR cadet rifles are commonly used by military cadets and others for basic firearms and marksmanship training. It is used by the Boy Scouts in the United States for the rifle shooting merit badge.[5]

The low recoil of the cartridge makes it ideal for introductory firearms courses. Novice shooters can be surprised or frightened by the noise and recoil of more powerful rounds. Beginners shooting firearms beyond their comfort level frequently develop a habit of flinching in an attempt to counter anticipated recoil. The resulting habit impedes correct posture and follow-through at the most critical phase of the shot and is difficult to correct. With high recoil eliminated, other errors in marksmanship technique are easier to identify and correct.

Available for this round are AR-15 upper receivers and M1911 slide assemblies. Many handgun manufacturers have an upper pistol conversion kit to make it shoot .22 LR ammunition. These conversions allow shooters to practice inexpensively while retaining the handling characteristics of their chosen firearms (with reduced recoil and muzzle blast). Additionally, .22 LR cartridge conversion kits allow practice at indoor ranges which prohibit high-power firearms. Owners of guns that use gas systems, such as AR-15 sport style rifles, normally avoid firing non-jacketed .22 LR cartridge ammunition, as the use of unjacketed ammunition may cause lead-fouling of the gas-port inside the barrel and costly gunsmithing procedures.

A wide variety of .22 LR ammunition is available commercially, and the available ammunition varies widely both in price and performance. Bullet weights among commercially available ammunition range from 20 to 60 grains (1.3 to 3.9 g), and velocities vary from 575 to 1,750 ft/s (175 to 533 m/s). .22 LR is the least costly cartridge ammunition available.[6] Promotional loads for plinking can be purchased in bulk for significantly less cost than precision target rounds. The low cost of ammunition has a substantial effect on the popularity of the .22 LR. For this reason, rimfire cartridges are commonly used for target practice.

.22 LR cartridges are commonly packaged in boxes of 50 or 100 rounds, and is often sold by the 'brick', a carton containing either 10 boxes of 50 rounds or loose cartridges totaling 500 rounds, or the 'case' containing 10 bricks totaling 5,000 rounds. Annual production is estimated by some at 2–2.5 billion rounds.[7][8] The NSSFestimates that a large percentage of the US production of 10 billion cartridges is composed of .22 LR.[9] Despite the high production figures there have occasionally been shortages of .22 LR cartridge in the continental United States, most notably during the 2008–13 United States ammunition shortage.

Performance[edit]

Two .22 LR rounds compared to a .45 ACP cartridge

Performance depends on barrel length and the type of action. For example, it will often perform differently in a bolt-action rifle than in a semiautomatic rifle. The .22 LR is effective to 150 yd (140 m), though practical ranges tend to be less. After 150 yd, the ballistics of the round are such that it will be difficult to compensate for the large "drop". The relatively short effective range, low report, and light recoil has made it a favorite for use as a target-practice cartridge. The accuracy of the cartridge is good, but not exceptional; various cartridges are capable of the same or better accuracy. A contributing factor in rifles is the transition of even a high-velocity cartridge projectile from supersonic to subsonic within 100 yd (91 m). As the bullet slows, the shock wave caused by supersonic travel overtakes the bullet and can disrupt its flight path, causing minor but measurable inaccuracies.

When zeroed for 100 yd (91 m), the arc-trajectory of the standard high-velocity .22 LR with a 40-gr bullet has a 2.7-inch (69 mm) rise at 50 yd (46 m), and a 10.8-inch (27 cm) drop at 150 yd (140 m).[10] A .22 LR rifle needs to be zeroed for 75 yd (69 m) to avoid overshooting small animals like squirrels at intermediate distances.[10]

As a hunting cartridge, rimfires are mainly used to kill small game up to the size of coyotes.[11] Although proper shot placement can kill larger animals such as deer or hog,[12] it is not recommended because its low power may not guarantee a humane kill.[13] The largest recorded animal killed with a .22 long caliber rifle was a grizzly bear in 1953.[14]


22 Long Rifle – subsonic hollow point (left), standard velocity (center), hyper-velocity "Stinger" hollow point (right)

Type

Rimfire cartridge

Place of origin

United States

Production history

Designer

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company

Designed

1887

Specifications

Parent case

.22 Long[1]

Case type

Rimmed, straight[1]

Bullet diameter

0.223 in (5.7 mm) - 0.2255 in (5.73 mm)[1]

Neck diameter

.226 in (5.7 mm)[1]

Base diameter

.226 in (5.7 mm)[1]

Rim diameter

.278 in (7.1 mm)[1]

Rim thickness

.043 in (1.1 mm)[1]

Case length

.613 in (15.6 mm)[1]

Overall length

1.000 in (25.4 mm)[1]

Rifling twist

1:16"[1]

Primer type

Rimfire[1]

Ballistic performance




Bullet mass/type

Velocity

Energy


40 gr. (2.6 g) Solid[2]

1,200 ft/s (370 m/s)

131 ft⋅lbf (178 J)

38 gr. (2.5 g) Copper-plated HP[2]

1,260 ft/s (380 m/s)

134 ft⋅lbf (182 J)

32 gr. (2.1 g) Copper-plated HP[2]

1,430 ft/s (440 m/s)

141 ft⋅lbf (191 J)

31 gr. (2.0 g) Copper-plated RN[3]

1,750 ft/s (530 m/s)

204 ft⋅lbf (277 J)

30 gr. (1.9 g) Copper-plated HP

[3]

1,640 ft/s (500 m/s)

191 ft⋅lbf (259 J)


Test barrel length: 18.5"

Source(s): [2][3]




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.22_Long_Rifle




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Reloading Podcast 247 - It weighs on us...

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking scales and some load questions.

  1. Jason Svoboda Posted in RLPG:

    Hey everybody, my Lyman analog scale just broke. What are your recommendations for a new scale? Prefer digital. (How did he break a beam scale?)

    1. WAOAW Digital scale

  2. Denny Rice Posted in RLPG:

    I know someone has probably ask this before, but I am pretty new to the hobby.. I need to purchase a digital scale for my reloading room, any suggestions would be grateful. Thanks.

  3. Kevin Smith posted in RLPG:
    “Can you load 115 grain bullets in a standard 243 brass 100 grain gunpowder yes or no way”

  4. Nate Segar posted in TRRG:

    What would happen, all other things being the same (powder, primer, bullet, and OAL) if a reloaded .380 was fired in a 9mm chamber?  

    I use range brass for reloading 9mm, and every once in a great while a .380 case will slip through. As far as I know none have made it as far as being fired.

  5. Ron Carpenter posted in TRRG:

    I bought some new Lake City 223 brass and I can only get about 3 reloads out of it before the necks crack. Is that about right? My Nosler and Norma brass goes way past that.

  6. Bruce Estabrook posted in TRRG:

    Any reason I can't run these in my 460 S&W T/C Encore pistol? Don't see any data in my Hornady book just the 200 gr FTX.

  7. John Musbach posted in TRRG:

    I'm ready to try stainless pin, any recipes? Some people don't use pins at all? Any help would be appreciated.

    1. Southern Shine Media





Cartridge corner: 250-3000/.250 Savage


History


The .250 Savage was designed by U.S wildcatter and cartridge designer Charles Newton for the Savage model 99 lever action rifle.


The premise behind the .250 design was to utilize a light, small caliber bullet weight, driven at extremely high velocity (for 1915) with the belief that such a combination would be more effective than current deer hunting cartridges. It was hoped that the new cartridge would be a breakthrough in cartridge design.

During this time, hunters were already marveling at high velocity cartridges including the 30-30, .30-40, .30-06, the .303 British throughout the Commonwealth along with the 7mm and 8mm Mauser, nearly all of these being military derivatives.

Using a 25 caliber (.257") 87 grain bullet, Newton designed the new cartridge to break the 3000fps barrier. Newton also had a catchy slogan which he was determined to use - the .250-3000. Arthur Savage, founder of the Savage Arms company, wasn't so sure about the idea and believed a 100 grain bullet would be more suitable for deer. Ultimately, Newton was unable to drive the 100 grain bullet at the 3000fps slogan he wished to market and managed to persuade Savage to adopt the 87 grain load. The design was settled and in 1915 the .250-3000 was introduced.


The .250-3000 became extremely popular for a time, then gradually lost favor. Hunters, not only in the U.S but throughout the world adopted the Savage for its advertised virtues but soon found the cartridge wanting. The lightly constructed 87 grain factory load would sometimes suffer bullet blow up on impact and fail to penetrate the onside muscle and bone of a variety of deer species. Wounding was often both narrow and shallow and game animals would run after being hit with well placed shots. To add to the frustration, many hunters found the light recoiling, fast handling and highly accurate Savage rifle extremely nice to use. Hunters were loathe to part with the Savage rifle but loathe to use the cartridge on deer.


Eventually, a 100 grain load was created for the .250 but by this time, the cartridge already had a bad rap. Nevertheless, a small portion of hunters continued to enjoy using the .250 on light bodied game, favoring the light recoil of the .250 combined with the desirable qualities of the Savage 99 rifle. As can be expected, the .250 was a great cartridge for training young hunters and it is in this last role that the .250 Savage has survived through to the present.


In main stream hunting circles, the final decline of the .250 occurred as a direct result of the 1950’s introduction of the .243 Winchester. The .243 fired identical weight projectiles but at higher velocities along with superior sectional densities for deeper penetration on game as well as higher ballistic coefficients producing greater down range energy.


Performance

The history of the .250 Savage speaks for itself with regards to performance on game. The .250 is a very mild powered cartridge and for best performance on game weighing above 50kg (120lb) is completely reliant on extremely careful shot placement. In its hey day, the Savage rifle was not designed to be fitted with a scope and even today, very few .250 Savage rifles feature scopes which compounds problems with exact shot placement accordingly.

Unfortunately, 87 grain .257” projectiles really do lack suitable SD’s and BC’s for hunting medium game, especially as ranges exceed 150 yards. 100 grain projectiles are much better suited to hunting light bodied deer but due to velocity limitations of the .250 Savage, wounds tend to be narrow and while kills out to moderate ranges can be considered clean, chest shot game will often travel long distances before expiring.

This cartridge is much closer in performance to the .223 Remington than the .243 Winchester or .257 Roberts.  That said, the .250 Savage does of course duplicate the performance of the .243 and .257 when the latter are used at longer ranges. In like fashion, the 100 grain bullet produces fastest killing when either striking the CNS or to maximize wounding and bleeding, placed to strike the forwards locomotive muscles and bones of the foreleg. Readers are encouraged to read both the .223 and .243 texts in order to gain a thorough understanding of game killing with small calibers.



Factory Ammunition

Both Remington and Winchester produce 100 grain soft point loads for the .250 Savage at an advertised 2820fps (24” test barrels) for realistic velocities in 22” barrels of around 2750fps. Both are adequate lighter medium game loads when used with care.


Hand Loading

Most hunters in the possession of .250 Savage caliber rifles tend to be hand loaders and of these, many develop loads specifically for use by young family members.


Powders in the W760, 4350, H414 range produce the best balance of high velocity versus low pressure for the now aging .250 Savage rifles. Using these powders, 85/87 grain bullets can be driven at just over 3000fps, 100 grain bullets to 2800fps and 117/120 grain bullets at 2600fps. In some instances, reloaders have been able to utilize modern powders to drive 100 grain bullets at 3000fps. Though it is only a 200fps increase, the difference in the field is noticeable. Nevertheless, 3000fps with a 100 grain bullet must be treated as an exception rather than the rule and reloaders must always be careful regarding older rifles.


Today, all .257 caliber projectiles under 100 grains are designed purely for varmints. It is worth noting, the original Winchester Western loads designed for and which failed on deer were of a similar construction. Sierra produce a 75 grain Hollow point and 87 grain soft point, Speer produce the 87 grain soft point and TNT hollow point while Hornady offer a 75 grain hollow point, the 75 grain V-Max and an 87 grain soft point. Nosler produce an 85 grain Ballistic tip and of the varmint bullet offerings, this is perhaps the most useful light game bullet for use on animals weighing between 40 and 60kg (90-130lb) out to moderate ranges.


For game weighing up to a maximum of 80kg (180lb), the most consistent performing projectiles are the 100 grain conventional bullets. The mild velocity of 2800fps minimizes the risk of bullet blow up which opens up a wide range of choices. The higher muzzle velocities of 3000fps are not overly harsh on 100 grain projectiles either, all of today’s projectiles are designed to be launched from the spectacular .25-06 at velocities in excess of 3300fps.


Soft projectiles such as the 100 grain Hornady Interlock Remington’s Core-Lokt are both reliable performers in the .250 Savage. That said, the Nosler 100 grain Ballistic Tip and Sierra GameKing both produce wider, faster bleeding wounds.


Speer produce three styles of 100 grain projectile, the extremely soft BTSP, a hollow point and the more consistent 100 grain Spitzer. The BTSP and hollow point are much more akin to varmint projectiles than light medium game projectiles and neither should be used on game weighing more than 40kg (90lb).


Premium 100 grain projectiles include the Swift Scirocco and A-Frame, the Barnes TSX and Nosler Partition. Of these, the Nosler Partition, as old as this design is, is still the best choice for heavier deer. The Partition has an extremely soft front core and gives not only fast but also full expansion at low impact velocities and energies.


At the heavier end of the scale, 110 to 120 grain projectiles leave the muzzle of most .250 Savage rifles a little too slowly to impart wide, fast bleeding wounds. That said, the more frangible designs can make for a decent close range woods load. These include the 115 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip, the 117 grain Sierra GameKing and 117 grain Hornady SST. Penetration with all of the above loads is generally deep at low impact velocities and at point blank ranges, bleeding is fast yet with minimal meat damage. Stouter choices include the 120 grain Speer Hotcor and the 115 and 120 grain Partition projectiles. Both, when fired at 2600fps, are capable of tail to chest penetration on lighter deer species. In this respect the .250 Savage compares very favorably with the .30-30.


Closing Comments

The .250 Savage was an important step in the development of the modern hunting cartridge. From the .250, ballisticians and hunters were able to learn about velocity versus bullet weight and velocity versus bore size in the pursuit of effective game killing. Thousands of deer were taken with the .250 up until the late 1950’s but make no mistake, many hundreds of animals suffered overly slow kills.  

For several of today’s hunters, the .250-3000 holds classic appeal and there is no doubt that the Savage 99 was a fine rifle, both aesthetically and in function. Light bodied game are still harvested with the .250, often by youths under the watchful eye of an experienced parent. The .250 can either produce consistent or abysmal results. The hunter can maximize performance by setting game weight limitations as well as being vigilant in angling shots to destroy not only vitals but also locomotive muscle and bone.






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Reloading Podcast 246 - Moist Nuggets

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are covering reloading apps and Mosin Nagant chambers.

                                                                       

  1. Reloading phone apps: I just found Dillon precision app in App Store, they have one in google play. Very versatile. AmmoSeek Is pretty good at finding component prices too. Dillon app can even calculate power factor. I need to check on a shot timer for range. Daniel

  2. Message: Hello Gentlemen, Love the show. Question: I measured my mosin chamber using Sinclair chamber length gauge. I'm reloading once fired 7.62x54r brass. My fired brass is more than .030 shorter than the Sinclair gauge measurements. Do I trim my brass to a similar length or keep the once fired brass as is until I reach the trim to length? I ask because my once fired brass is not all uniform in case length. If I load these as is, will accuracy suffer due to the brass being different lengths? Hope that makes sense! I realize a mosin is hardly a precision instrument but learning the basics before trying on a better firearm. Thanks! Erik

  3. Hey guys, I have been listening for a while now and like what you guys are doing. I have been reloading since I was 12 with my dad. I have only reloaded rifle rounds for hunting various critters in Oregon and now Idaho. 220 Swift, 243 win, 260 rem, 25-06, 270 win, 30-06, 300 rum and most recently added the 280 Ackley.  It seems that you guys are mostly into pistol stuff but I hear of an old timer in your midsts that has a 280 Ackley. Lol. I’m just curious of your personal process of getting your loads up and running. This is my wife’s new elk rifle and have worked up a load for the 168 gr AccuBond long range bullets. I was just interested in how you set yours up.  Rem 700 action, 24 in kreger w 1 in 9 twist sitting in a bell and Carlson stock. Timney trigger. Keep up the good work!! Tyler in North Idaho


Cartridge corner:   . none




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Reloading Podcast 245 - Whidden Gun Works

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking with John Whidden of Whidden Gun Works.

  1. Whidden Gun Works

Cartridge Corner Notes:

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Reloading Podcast 244 - Grab that powder and get loading

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are helping you figure out powder choosing methods.

  1. Matthew Schinzing
    Any suggestions on the best way to choose between powders in a c  aliber. Specifically between reloader 15 and cfe223 in 6.5 grendel pushing a 129gr pill. I’m using a 16” barrel so I think a faster burn rate would be better but I don’t know how they compare.

  2. Greg Lacey posted in RLPG
    Looking for powder recommendations for 6.5 Grendel. I am using Varget under a 120 gr Hornady ELDM. I am getting around 2350 ft/sec. I am wanting to get the velocity up to decrease wind effect at longer distance. What powders are giving good accuracy and velocity with 120 and 130 gr bullets? Also hoping to have good temp stability.

    If I am able to get the performance out of them I am also looking to step up to a 130 gr pill. Have looked through several reloading manuals, but not wanting to try every powder in there. So far my short list for 130s is: IMR 8208 XBR, Win 748, BLC-2, and Accurate 2520.

    Thanks for your input!

  3. Tim Denton RLPG
    I finally got to listen to your podcast 243 today and I was listening to your discussion about the guy not hitting the target at 700 yards but grouping quit nicely at 500 yards. So it made me start thinking about the transition into and out of Mach also known as transonic. Transonic happens in between 0.8 and 1.2 Mach (Amazing I remember this from my Aerospace college years lol). So depending on the object "bullet" he is in transonic between 900 and 1350 ft/sec. Now this is at sea level, 64 degrees F and in dry air and I did check myself with wikipedia. As a side note our pilot instructors call the transonic area "Where Elvis lives" and you don't want to stay in that area very long it would shake your plane a lot. Well I hope this helps and keep up the great work guys I really enjoy the podcast.

  4. Zack Gates  RLPG 17 Mar 19

    37.6 but SD was 11.5. Seating depth was 2.200. Could changing seating depth make my SD better? Shooting 6.5 CM with 140 gr Berger elite hunters.





Cartridge Corner Notes:375 Winchester

History


The .375 Winchester was released in 1978 as the initial chambering for Winchester’s Big Bore 94 lever action rifle. The .375 was a revised high power version of the .38-55 Winchester-Ballard black powder cartridge which, in 1894, was one of the initial chamberings of the then new Winchester M94 lever action rifle.


Designed byby U.S gunmaker Charles H Ballard; historical authorities generally agree that the .38-55 Ballard was first introduced in 1884. Ballard’s first major innovation was the creation of an extremely well designed single shot rifle action. After patenting his action in 1861 Ballard sold the rights to use his design to various gun makers. In 1875 John M Marlin adopted the Ballard action which was used as a basis to build accurate rifles. In 1881 Marlin formed the Marlin Firearms company and it is around this time period that the first references can be found of the .38-55 Ballard proprietary cartridge being offered in the Marlin single shot No.4 Perfection.


The .38-55 Ballard earned a reputation as an extremely good cartridge for target shooting out to 300 yards. It was smaller than some of the more common bores in use at that time but produced a good trajectory and low recoil. The most common load consisted of a 255 grain .375 caliber bullet at 1200fps.


With the continued popularity of the .38-55 Ballard, Winchester adopted it as one of the two initial chamberings for their new M1894 Winchester rifle. This rifle is now most famous for its .30-30WCF chambering. After its adoption by Winchester the .38-55 cartridge later came to be called the .38-55 Winchester-Ballard but was also sometimes referred to as the .38-55 Winchester or simply the .38-55 as it was not usually confused with other chamberings. After the turn of the century many of the old black powder cartridges lost popularity as hunters switched to bolt action rifles and bottle necked rimless cartridges. Winchester eventually dropped the .38-55 chambering. Even though its popularity was limited, it continued to maintain a small following amongst black powder cartridge fans which still exists today.


The 1960’s was a time of great creativity, though it was also at this time that Winchester began to instigate cost cutting changes. Nevertheless in 1963, in an attempt to modernize the lever action rifle, Winchester released the Model 88 lever action rifle chambered for the .284 Winchester cartridge. The .284 cartridge was a flat shooting and hard hitting 7mm, a great all-round cartridge, however sales of this rifle were poor and the M88 was soon dropped from production.


From the poor reception of the M88, Winchester designers came to the conclusion that the success of lever action rifle sales depended on classic designs. In 1978 Winchester released a new rifle and cartridge based on these principles. The new rifle was simply a beefed up stronger version of the original M94 lever action rifle and was named the Big Bore 94. Along with the revised rifle came a revised version of Winchester’s original M94 .38-55 chambering, the .375 Winchester.


Winchester factory loads for the .375 featured a 200 grain flat nose Powerpoint bullet at an advertised 2200fps and a 250 grain Powerpoint bullet at 1900fps. These velocities were recorded in a 24” test barrel and true velocities from 20” barrels were more in the region of 2100 and 1800fps respectively.


In 1981 the Winchester company was sold and renamed as the U.S Repeating Arms Company (U.S.R.A.C). Along with this change of hands came modifications to the Big Bore rifle (1982) incorporating side ejection to facilitate the mounting of a scope. The modified rifle was named the Big Bore XTR AE (angle eject). Two new Big Bore cartridges were also introduced at this time, the .307 and .356 Winchester, these were part of Winchester’s original intention to create a family of potent, high pressure cartridges for the Winchester lever action rifle.


Also at this time a fourth .400 caliber cartridge waited in the wings. But contrary to the hopes of the designers all three Winchester cartridges (.307, .356, .375) failed to obtain any lasting popularity. The .375 caliber rifle was the first to fall from production and by the mid 1990’s the .307 and .356 caliber rifles were also discontinued. Today these cartridges enjoy a small and quiet following amongst fans of unique lever action cartridges. Winchester continue to produce one of the two original factory loads for the .375, the 200 grain Powerpoint.


In comparison to the original .38-55 cartridge case, the .375 has thicker case walls and a stronger head. The case is .65” shorter than the .38-55, an odd decision as this potentially allows the .375 rated at 50,000CUP to be accidently chambered in a .38-55 caliber rifle, the .38-55 being rated at 30,000CUP. Due to the fact that the .38-55 case is longer than the .375, it is unsafe to fire .38-55 ammunition in the big bore rifle. That said, a small number of Big Bore rifles were reamed to .38-55 and stamped 38-55/ .375 Winchester. These rifles, of which I have owned one, can fire both ammunitions safely.


Document quoted link:

https://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/.375+Winchester.html?__utma=1.1129738760.1553037324.1553037324.1553037324.1&__utmb=1.4.10.1553037324&__utmc=1&__utmx=-&__utmz=1.1553037324.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|utmccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=-&__utmk=55234987


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Reloading Podcast 243 - It gets wobbly past 500

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are discussing press mounting systems and load questions.

  1. Good Morning,   Here is the issue, I have been shooting .308 for years. Just recently (a month ago) started reloading, my first time with the whole process. It has been a very fun experience. I went out to 700 yards for the first time with one of my newest rifles, a Mossberg MVP LC .308, 18.5 inch barrel with a 1/10 twist. I'm using a 165 grain A-MAX and sometimes a 168 grain ELD bullet. I ran into a problem, here goes the story.  I shoot lights out at anything from under 550 yards. Once I stretch past that I am lucky if I get two out of ten. People are trying to sell me on the idea that my barrel is too short, my bullet is too heavy and my FPS is too low. I'm currently chronographed at an average of 2300 feet per second. Some of the things they are saying (and I cant verify if true or false) : The barrel is not long enough and all the powder is not burning. (varget powder 39.5 grains) The bullet is too heavy and doesn't stabilize well past 550 yards (I have a 3 inch group at 550 yards on paper) we are not allowed to put paper targets past that because the terrain is hazardous to walk on.The Barrel is not long enough to stabilize that round (doesn't make sense because I have .305" grouping at 100yds) The wind affects a .308 more than any other round, you will never be as accurate as you want to be with that caliber.Push your velocity up to 2700 and see if that helps (2700 would require me to run the max load for that bullet) In conclusion, I have ran load tests, scope calibration tests, and even had my weapon cleaned and inspected by a gun smith who gave me a C.O.L. that would allow me to touch the lands. After three months of failing to be consistent at 700 yards I have decided to reach out to you. Are they giving me good or bad information? I know this is an awful lot of stuff, but I had nowhere else to get professional and accurate information specific to my needs.






Cartridge Corner Notes:.30-378 Weatherby Magnum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The .30-378 was originally designed by Roy Weatherby as an anti-personnel/anti-materiel military cartridge for a government contract.[4] The cartridge was created by necking down the .378 Weatherby Magnum to accept a .308 in (7.8 mm) diameter bullet. The United States Army’s Redstone Arsenal requested a rifle cartridge that could develop 6,000 ft/s (1,800 m/s) for the effects of light bullets against armor. The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum was able to attain over 5,000 ft/s (1,500 m/s). Using a slower burning and denser propellant, the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum surpassed the US Army’s requirement of 6,000 ft/s (1,800 m/s).[5]


However, the shooting public had to wait until 1996 for Weatherby to release the cartridge.[6] In the meantime, the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum had gone on to set world records in 1,000 yards (910 m) benchrest competitions. Earl Chronister, shooting a .30-378 Weatherby Magnum shot the first ever ten shot 10X with the first nine shot to 3.125 inches and the tenth flyer for an overall group of 4.375 inches. This record stood for over 30 years. Several variations of the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum were created by custom ammunition manufacturers, known as wildcatters. Hammond rifles and H-S Precision were among the several custom gun manufacturers who chambered and built rifles long before Weatherby got around to releasing the rifle to the public.[5]


In 1991 Shooting Times editor Layne Simpson met with Ed Weatherby, the son of Weatherby Inc. founder Roy Weatherby, and urged him to release the .30-378 Weatherby to the public as a standard chambering in the Mark V action.[3] In 1995 Layne Simpson built a rifle chambered for the .30-378 Weatherby and developed loading data and passed the data on to Norma Precision to provide a basis for their factory loaded ammunition.[5]



Design and specification

The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum utilizes the .378 Weatherby Magnum as a parent cartridge. The .378 Weatherby case was necked down to accept a .30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet while preserving the double radii shoulder of the parent case. The resulting case held a greater volume than any previous commercial cartridge.


When the cartridge was created by Roy Weatherby in 1959 there were no commercial propellants that suited the cartridge. Even the standard slow burning powder of the time IMR4350 which was used in the Weatherby line of cartridges was too fast to take advantage of the case capacity of the .30-378 Weatherby cartridge. The result was that performance advantage that was created by the volume of the .30-378 Weatherby was minimal over the competing .300 Weatherby Magnum cartridge, which had been introduced 25 years earlier. However, when launching 30 gr (1.9 g) bullets which are extremely light for caliber as the Redstone Arsenal contract specified, required the use of relatively faster propellants. However, the hunting public and target shooters used 150 gr and heavier bullets, which require slower burning powders due to the extreme overbore nature of the cartridge.


.30-378 Weatherby Magnum - SAAMI compliant (2013-11-30) dimensions

SAAMI compliant .30-378 Weatherby Magnum cartridge schematic: All dimensions in inches [millimeters].

SAAMI recommends a 6 groove barrel with a twist rate of 10 in (250 mm). The recommended bore diameter is .3005 in (7.63 mm) and groove diameter is .3080 in (7.82 mm) with each groove having an arc width of .118 in (3.0 mm).


Performance


The .30-378 has a much larger body diameter than the .300 Weatherby Magnum.

The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum is one of the most accurate rifle cartridges. The cartridge held the world record for accuracy at 1,000 yards (910 m) for over thirty years. Given factory ammunition, Weatherby guarantees 1.5 MOA accuracy from their Weatherby Mark V action rifles and sub-MOA (.99 MOA or better) accuracy from their Range Certified line of rifles and Vanguard rifle lines. Careful handloading – checking for bullet jacket concentricity, weighing of brass and bullets, uniformity of case length and overall cartridge length, choice of components, seating of bullet – can all increase the accuracy of the cartridge.


The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum is a long range cartridge. It is the most powerful - in terms of energy - .30 caliber production cartridge available.[7] It is also the flattest-shooting .30 caliber factory ammunition available. Dependent on the ammunition chosen the cartridge has a maximum point blank range of over 400 yd (370 m). The cartridge retains enough energy for deer-sized game at distances over 1,000 yd (910 m), and has enough retained energy for elk and moose-sized game at a distance of over 700 yd (640 m).[4]


Sporting usage

Like all Weatherby rifle cartridges the .30-378 Weatherby was designed to be a high performance hunting cartridge. When released to the public, it is intended for the hunting of all the big game species of North America, Asia and Africa, save dangerous game. Since this is a small bore caliber, hunting with the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum should be restricted to game less than 2,000 lb (910 kg).


Soon after the .30-378 Weatherby was designed it was adopted by the benchrest shooting community. It became popular among the 1,000 yards (910 m) shooting communities such as the Original 1,000 yards (910 m) Club of Pennsylvania and went on to shoot world records at that distance.[3][5]


The Thompson Long Range shooting school uses the .30-378 Weatherby due to its high accuracy and reliable performance.[8]



Type Rifle

Place of origin USA

Production history

Designer Roy Weatherby

Designed 1959

Manufacturer Weatherby Inc.

Produced 1996 - Current

Variants .30-.378 Magnum, .30/378 Arch, .30/378 Weatherby

Specifications

Parent case .378 Weatherby Magnum

Bullet diameter .308 in (7.8 mm)

Neck diameter .337 in (8.6 mm)

Shoulder diameter .561 in (14.2 mm)

Base diameter .582 in (14.8 mm)

Rim diameter .579 in (14.7 mm)

Case length 2.913 in (74.0 mm)

Overall length 3.690 in (93.7 mm)

Case capacity 133 gr H2O (8.6 cm3)

Rifling twist 1-10"

Primer type Large rifle magnum

Maximum pressure 63,817 psi (440.00 MPa)

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy

165 gr (11 g) BST 3,500 ft/s (1,100 m/s) 4,488 ft⋅lbf (6,085 J)

180 gr (12 g) BST 3,420 ft/s (1,040 m/s) 4,676 ft⋅lbf (6,340 J)

200 gr (13 g) Partition 3,160 ft/s (960 m/s) 4,434 ft⋅lbf (6,012 J)

Test barrel length: 26" (660 mm)

Source(s): Weatherby [1]

The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum is a .30 caliber, belted, bottle-necked rifle cartridge.[2] The cartridge was developed in response to a US Army military contract in 1959. While still unreleased to the public, the cartridge went on to set world records for accuracy including the first ten 10X in 1,000 yards (910 m) benchrest shooting.[3] It is currently the highest velocity .30 caliber factory ammunition available.



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Reloading Podcast 242 - Miguel from Freedom Seed Brass

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are Talking with Miguel from Freedom Seed Brass.

  1. Freedom Seed interview Freedom Seed Brass Promo Code 20 % discount using promo code Reloading Podcast

    1. History of

    2. Miguel’s personal reloading history

    3. Future plans

    4. Other questions

    5. EGW Chamber Checker

    6. support@freedomseedbrass.com

    7. https://www.instagram.com/freedomseedbrass/?hl=en

  2. Hello all... loading 44 mag and I'm needing some piece of mind with a question that's bugging me....Book says shot out of 8 inch barrel should be 1340 fps, when I shoot out of 18inch Henry big boy.  I get 1560 fps average. I fully understand faster velocity for barrel length. But my question is does it change pressure or is pressure consistent with lead data no matter barrel length?

  3. Winchester aging tool





Cartridge Corner Notes:.300 AAC Blackout


The .300 AAC Blackout (designated as the 300 BLK by the SAAMI[1] and 300 AAC Blackout by the C.I.P.[2]), also known as 7.62×35mm is a carbine cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. Its purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacities. Care should be taken not to use 300 BLK ammunition in a rifle chambered for 7.62×40mm Wilson Tactical.[3]


History


While 5.56×45mm NATO has enjoyed widespread acceptance in military circles, the nature of the missions encountered by some special operations groups often demand a round that provides better performance than that available in the high-energy standard velocity rounds and subsonic performance greater than standard 9mm (the ubiquitous pistol round also commonly used in many SMGs).[4]


To satisfy this need, AAC developed the 300 AAC Blackout in cooperation with Remington Defense—under the direction of AAC's Research and Development Director Robert Silvers and with the support of the company's founder, Kevin Brittingham.[5][6]


Meeting these goals allowed the development team to negate many of the perceived drawbacks inherent to other large caliber cartridges used in the M4. Colt Firearms and other arms makers had previously chambered AR-pattern rifles and carbines in various .30 caliber rounds but encountered problems. In the case of the 7.62×39mm, its relatively severe case angle caused feeding issues unless specially modified AK-47 magazines were used, and even then results were unsatisfactory[citation needed] Modified bolts were also needed owing to its larger case head diameter. Rounds such as the 6.8 SPC and 6.5 Grendel had similar part-interchangeability issues but did allow for the use of the standard M4/M16 30-round magazine albeit with a reduced capacity.[7]



300 AAC Blackout rounds shot from a suppressed M4 Carbine.

Wildcat cartridges such as the .300 Whisper series addressed these issues, but their widespread use in single shot handguns and lack of industry standard cartridge dimension meant that a great number of the popular loads on both the supersonic and subsonic end of the spectrum were less than ideal in the AR pattern weapons. Many of these rounds required an excessively long overall cartridge length that would prohibit feeding in a STANAG magazine while using powder charges that were not compatible with the pressure requirements of the M4 carbine. This was particularly noticeable when using subsonic ammunition in conjunction with a suppressor as short stroking and excessive fouling would occur similar to that which was seen in the earliest variants of the M16 in Vietnam.[8]


By keeping the M4/M16 in mind as the primary host during load development the designers could work up a host of cartridges that not only satisfied the ballistic requirements set forth, but also ensured mechanical reliability with the fewest changes to the weapon itself—with only a simple barrel change necessary for complete conversion.[9]


Robert Silvers, director of research and development for AAC said, "We started development in 2009, but most of the work was done in 2010. A military customer wanted a way to be able to shoot .30-cal. bullets from an M4 platform while using normal bolts and magazines, and without losing the full 30-round capacity of standard magazines. They also wanted a source for ammunition made to their specs. We could not have just used .300-.221 or .300 Whisper because Remington is a SAAMI company, and will only load ammunition that is a SAAMI-standard cartridge. We had to take the .300-221 wildcat concept, determine the final specs for it, and submit it to SAAMI. We did that, and called it the .300 AAC Blackout (.300 BLK)."[10]


300 AAC BLACKOUT was approved by SAAMI on January 17, 2011.


On October 23, 2011, SSG Daniel Horner of the USAMU used 300 AAC Blackout to win his 4th USPSA Multi Gun National Championship.[11]


SPECS:
Type Rifle

Place of origin United States

Specifications

Parent case .221 Fireball/.223 Remington

Case type Rimless, bottleneck

Bullet diameter 0.308 in (7.8 mm)

Neck diameter 0.334 in (8.5 mm)

Base diameter 0.376 in (9.6 mm)

Rim diameter 0.378 in (9.6 mm)

Case length 1.368 in (34.7 mm)

Overall length 2.26 in (57 mm)

Rifling twist 1:7

Primer type Small rifle

Maximum pressure (SAAMI) 55,000

Maximum pressure (CIP) 53,000

Maximum CUP 52000 CUP

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy

125 gr (8 g) OTM 2,215 ft/s (675 m/s) 1,360 ft⋅lbf (1,840 J)

220 gr (14 g) OTM 1,010 ft/s (310 m/s) 498 ft⋅lbf (675 J)

78 gr (5 g) Lehigh Defense CQ 2,800 ft/s (850 m/s) 1,358 ft⋅lbf (1,841 J)

90 gr (6 g) Barnes OTFB 2,550 ft/s (780 m/s) 1,300 ft⋅lbf (1,800 J)

110 gr (7 g) Hornady Black V-MAX 2,375 ft/s (724 m/s) 1,377 ft⋅lbf (1,867 J)

Test barrel length: 16 in



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Reloading Podcast 241 - pistol and rifle loads the same

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering the question, can I use the same load in my carbine/rifle as my handgun?

  1. Michael Meyn via Gmail

    Hello Gentlemen, I am getting ready to start loading for the wife’s BG38. Is there really much advantage to working up a ladder load for a short barreled revolver like the BG38. I ladder load everything else but am not sure if the short barrel will have enough accuracy to make it worth while? Your knowledgeable opinion would be appreciated!

  2. Craig Findlay sent via email
    Question.. 38 special/357 reloading

    Message: I shoot revolvers and lever action with .38 special and .357 magnum... any tips or thoughts on differences/similarities, and thoughts for reloading for both? any tips for one or the other or both? obviously, the barrel lengths have velocity effects, and maybe govern if the powder gets all burned or not... similar question regarding 30 carbine.. my M1 and Blackhawk....

thanks! love the show

  1. Rusty created a poll in RLPG

    Lead Free Barnes bullets in a 6.5CM what would you prefer for hunting mule deer? Lite and fast or heavier and slower. The solid bullets tend to need more velocity to expand properly and also seem to retain their weight better after impact. I am going to load all three options and see what my rifle likes and try to judge the impact energy somehow.

  2. Dave posted in TRRG CASE LUBE... Hornady One Shot or Redding Imperial?

  3. Joey Commesso posted in RLPG

    What's the best book to consult with for loading 45 lc. Lyman, Hornady and nosler aren't very helpful. I don't honestly know where to start. There has to be a load difference from a 45lc pistol and the Winchester cowboy action rifle right ? I'm loading for the rifle only.





Cartridge Corner Notes:


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Reloading Podcast 240 - More Questions

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Jeff posted in TRRG: Does anybody use 4350 with 150 gr bullets in 308? None of my manuals show this combo. I haven’t loaded much 308 but I’m going to soon. I have a bunch of 4350 and sure wanted to use it.

  2. Mark posted in CB&BC: What lead do YOU use to cast 45-70 bullets?

    The reason I ask, I have been using up my "Hard Ball" / Lyman #2 equivalent, and have been noticing more leading in the barrel than normal. The bullets are sized .002 over bore diameter, and a buddy mentioned that my lead might be too hard for the lower velocity I'm pushing them at.

    Should I switch my 'slower' bullets to a 1:20 or Wheel Weight mix to see if that solves my leading issue?

    1. Rooster Jacket

  3. Hi team,
    I found your show a fortnight ago and I'm having a blast listening to your back catalogue.

    I'm in Australia so my options are limited for what I can own but I have and reload for the following: howas 1500 in rem 223
    Howa 1500SA in 204 Ruger
    Ruger m77 in 6.5x55
    Marlin 1984 in 357
    Silver pigeon O/U

    I reload very manually using a Redding t7 but I treat it like a single. I have a Lyman g6 for measuring powder but also have a uniflow (not that I use it).
    I'm time poor so normally split my reloads into prep and then loading states as it's unlikely I'll be able to do it all in one hit.

    My current workflow is
    Universal decap
    Wet tumble clean
    Resize
    Trim /deburr/ tidy primers (remove crimp if needed)
    Short wet tumble to remove the lube
    Store until ready
    Then prime with a hand primer
    Use the g6 and a funnel to fill 50 rounds - checking with a torch
    Seat projectiles
    Repeat for the next batch of 50
    What's the best reloading workflow to get the most out of a turret and waste less time without compromising?
    Thank you Paul B

    1. ACT Coleman Trim It II

    2. FA Plat series Case prep






Cartridge Corner Notes: .35 Remington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The .35 Remington [8.9x49mm] is the only remaining cartridge from Remington's lineup of medium-power rimless cartridges still in commercial production. Introduced in 1906, it was originally chambered for the Remington Model 8 semi-automatic rifle in 1908.

It is also known as 9x49mm Browning and 9mm Don Gonzalo.

History

Over the years, the .35 Remington has been chambered in a variety of rifles by most firearms manufacturers, and continues in popularity today in the Marlin Model 336 lever-action. It is also a popular cartridge for single-shot hunting pistols like the Thompson/Center Contender and the Remington XP-100. For hunters looking for a good woods gun, (i.e., a medium power rifle with moderate recoil, for short to medium ranges) the .35 Remington is popular, taking second place to the .30-30 Winchester. It has a small but loyal following in the northeast and areas of the southern United States.

The cartridge uses a medium to heavy bullet and has moderate recoil based on a moderate pressure level of 33,500 CUP as set by SAAMI. The normal factory load consists of a 200 grain round-nosed bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2080 feet per second. This 200 grain bullet is nearly 18% heavier than the .30-30's 170 grain bullet, and has a 16% larger frontal area. This gives it a substantial increase in power over the .30-30, especially when used on larger game species.

Remington helped promote the advantage in power that the .35 Remington had over the .30-30 through a series of advertising campaigns in the early 1900s. One of their advertisements even publicized the ability of the .35 Remington to penetrate a 5/16″ steel plate, which the .30-30 Winchester could not do.

The .35 Remington is considered a fine round for deer, elk, black bear, and other medium and large game as long as ranges are reasonable. Hornady currently produces a .35 Remington load in their LEVERevolution line that features a rubber-tipped spitzer bullet which is safe to use in lever action or pump guns with tubular magazines.



.35 Remington

Munit07.jpg

Type   Rifle

Place of origin United States

Production history

Designer           Remington

Designed          1906

Manufacturer Remington

Specifications

Case type         Rimless, bottleneck

Bullet diameter .358 in (9.1 mm)

Neck diameter  .384 in (9.8 mm)

Shoulder diameter       .405 in (10.3 mm)

Base diameter   .458 in (11.6 mm)

Rim diameter .460 in (11.7 mm)

Case length     1.920 in (48.8 mm)

Overall length 2.525 in (64.1 mm)

Primer type     Large rifle

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type           Velocity             Energy

200 gr (13 g) Lead FN   2,084 ft/s (635 m/s)      1,929 ft⋅lbf (2,615 J)

180 gr (12 g) FN 2,122 ft/s (647 m/s)      1,800 ft⋅lbf (2,400 J)

200 gr (13 g) RN 2,071 ft/s (631 m/s)      1,905 ft⋅lbf (2,583 J)

200 gr (13 g) FTX (Hornady Flex Tip Expanding)[2]           2,225 ft/s (678 m/s)      2,198 ft⋅lbf (2,980 J)

Test barrel length: 24

Source(s): Accurate Powder [1]



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  • Current Patreons: Aaron R, Aaron S, AJ, Alexander R, Anthony B, Mr. Anonymoose, bt213456, Carl K, KC3FHH, D MAC, David S, Drew, Eric S, Gerrid M, Gun Funny, Jason R, Joel L, John C, Kalroy, Alexander R., Jason R. Ken C, Richard K, Brewer Bill, Mark H, Mark K,Vic T., Billy P., Matthew T., michael sp, Mike St, Mr. Attila the Hun, Patch Rat, N7FFL, Peter D, Richard C, Russ THE BIG BORE Russ H, T-Rex, Tim A, Tony S, Troy S, Winfred C



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Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

The Reloading Room

Reloading Podcast Google+

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Mike's Google+ Page

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Google+

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Google+

Jeremy Rowland on Facebook

Jeremy Rowland on google+

Trevor Furlotte on Facebook

SlamFire Radio on Facebook

Trevor Furlotte Gmail


Source: https://firearmsradio.tv/reloading-podcast