Reloading Podcast 091 - Casting Series Part 2: Safety

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio network.   Tonight the guys are talking about the safety equipment needed for casting.

  1. Todd Senne: I'm sure you've talked about this before, but I couldn't find an episode in the archives. I have some small primer 45 ACP brass I want to reload for plinking. Can I just use the regular recipe and use the small primer instead of a large? I haven't found any small primer recipes in any of the reloading manuals I have (Lyman, Speer and Lee). Might be a good show topic.  Thanks
  2. Safety Equipment:
    1. Safety glasses or preferably a full face shield
    2. hat (to cover neck)
    3. PANTS (no shorts)
    4. long sleeve Shirt or t-shirt with welding sleeves
    5. gloves (welders gloves or better)
    6. LOCATION is huge.  Do this in a well ventilated area preferably outdoors, or at least in a garage/shed area with great ventilation.  
    7. Exhaust fans of some sort
    8. dust mask/respirator
    9. LeadOff hand soap

 

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Thank you for listening.

 

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RLP 053 - Hardness of Lead Alloys

Tonight the guys are discussing bullet alloy hardness.

  • Lyman #2 alloy is 90% lead, 5% tin, and 5% antimony, the easiest and simplest way to make it, is to use 9 pounds of pure lead, and a 1 pound bar of 50/50 solder which contains a significant amount of antimony.
  • Linotype is composed of lead with 4% tin and 12% antimony. It’s considered by most to be too hard and too expensive to use for bullets undiluted.
  • Stereotype alloy 7% tin 15% antimony 78% lead, more durable intended for long print runs and curved printing plates.
  • Monotype is 10% tin 16% antimony 74% lead.  Hardest of the 3 and of course the most expensive.
  • The principal concept is to understand that what’s important here is bullet fit, and bullet hardness can be, and should be matched to the pressures that will be built up in the chamber of your gun when fired.
  • Links to a couple of YouTube videos on Hardness testing:
  • Video #1
  • video #2 video #3

 

  • Question: Shot 5 shot groups at 200 yds mixed with ladder test. The most accurate group was outside a vertical node. It was most accurate but not in cluster of other loads. Do you go w midpoint of vert node or best group. 308 168 amax re15 at 200 yds test. Best group 44 gr but best node was 42.5-43.5. 44 grain was .4 Moa which was 1/2 size of other groups.  #2. Second ladder with varget showed tightest group dead center of node. If this is the case do you still trickle all your loads since wiggle room looks decent .2 gr up and downPlease remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon, Brownells, and Sinclair.  it really does help the show and the network.

Thank you for listening.

How to get in contact with us:

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

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The Reloading Room

Reloading Podcast Google+

Mike Iselin on Facebook

Mike's Google+ Page

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Google+

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Google+

 

RLP 042 - Preparation for Casting Bullets

Tonight Jim and Mike are talking about the process for acquiring lead, rendering scrap lead, for eventually casting bullets

  1. acquiring lead.
    1. New
      1. Rotometals (can supply antimony and tin)
    2. recycled,
      1. Wheel weights (getting harder to find as places are switching to other metals)
      2. other casters (Facebook Group Cast Bullets & Bullet Casting, eBay)
      3. recycling centers (scrap yards)
      4. old Linotype
  2. Tools
    1. Heat source
    2. rendering pot (must be substantial you’re going to be putting a lot of heavy metal in the thing!)
    3. slotted spoon chefs grade
    4. safety equipment (Personal Protective Equipment aka PPE)
    5. ingot pans
    6. locking pliers and adjusting pliers
    7. ladle 1cup ladle is about 2 lb. of lead
    8. ball peen hammer
    9. Well ventilated area, preferably outside
  3. storage
    1. Kitty litter buckets
    2. five gallon buckets
    3. milk crates
    4. if at all possible keep the lead alloy bone dry.

 

Please remember to use the affiliate links for Amazon, Brownells, and Sinclair.  it really does help the show and the network.

Thank you for listening.

How to get in contact with us:

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

Reloading Podcast on Instagram

The Reloading Room

Reloading Podcast Google+

Mike on Facebook

Mike's Google+ Page

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Google+

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Google+

RLP 020-Casting Bullets

bullets
bullets

Tonight Jason gave Jim the boot for the week and we are, actually Jason and Shane are, talking about bullet casting.

What type of equipment do I need?

casting supplies

What does Jason use?

Pro-Melt Casting furnace

Lyman 4500

NOE bullet molds

X-Lox 2500

where can i get lead?

Local Tire shops

Ebay

local indoor ranges

local outdoor ranges

Old Printing presss

what is the bhn (Brinell Hardness Number)

Use antimony or tin to increase BHN of lead.

Inexpensive to start out, you need molds, but can melt lead another way.

Use a dutch oven on a coleman stove

Lee Dipper

Water and Lead do not mix, the explosion is worse than grease and water.

Cast bullets and bullet casting facebook page

How to get in contact with us:

Reloading Podcast website.

Reloading Podcast Facebook

The Reloading Room

Reloading Podcast Google+

Mike's Google+ Page

Jim Fleming on Facebook

Jim Fleming on Google+

Jason Trumbo on Facebook

Jason Trumbo on Google+