Reloading Podcast 248 - It's Phil's Fault

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering questions about not normal bullet weights.

  1. Hey guys, been listening to the show for a long time. You fellas do a great job at getting out good information while keeping it entertaining, as long as you can keep the old man awake that is. Keep up the good work and the friendly jabs.  How do you guys recommend loading bullets you don't have data for?  I'm shooting 357 Maximum and have great luck with the speed 180g hot cores but would like to try some of lehigh defense bullets. I've loaded both the 105g controlled fracturing and the 140g extreme penetrator in regular 357 magnum and have had good luck on both coyotes and deer (respectively). I'll be shooting these out of a TC Contender by the way. While lehigh publishes data for these bullets in 357 magnum they don't have data for 357 maximum. How do I go about using those lighter monolithic bullets in my max?

    1. Bonus data, I was able to run my loads through a magneto speed. I don't have my spreadsheet with me but out of a 16.5" barrel the 180g speer hot cores were cranking out at 1770 fps (in a maximum case) while the 357 magnum loads were 1780 for 140g and 2210 for the 105g. Thanks, Sean M

  2. Hello all... loading 44 mag and I'm needing some piece of mind with a question that's bugging me....Book says shot out of 8 inch barrel should be 1340 fps, when I shoot out of 18inch Henry big boy.  I get 1560fps average. I fully understand faster velocity for barrel length. But my question is does it change pressure or is pressure consistent with load data no matter barrel length? HogHead

  3. I have seating depth question for my 458 Socom loading. I have had a lot of success reloading and making accurate and reliable rounds from all the information I can collect. I have the Barnes 300gr TTSX and Lehigh Defense 300gr match. Very similar CNC copper bullet and load data created for both by Western Powders. The Barnes data seats the bullet 0.100 deeper in the case and 34.07 gr of Reloader 7 at 98% case fill producing 4.45 FPS more velocity per grain of powder. Lehigh bullet data load is a lot more powder to compacting the load and slower. What’s your opinion on reducing OAL of the Lehigh bullet to match the Barnes seating depth and powder load to produce similar velocity with the lower charge? Patrick H



Cartridge corner: American firearms manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company introduced the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in 1887.[4] The round owes its origin to the .22 BB Cap of 1845 and the .22 Short of 1857. It combined the casing of the .22 Long of 1871 with the 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet of the .22 Extra Long of 1880, giving it a longer overall length, a higher muzzle velocity and superior performance as a hunting and target round, rendering both the .22 Long and .22 Extra Long cartridges obsolete. The .22 LR uses a heeled bullet, which means that the bullet is the same diameter as the case, and has a narrower "heel" portion that fits in the case. It is one of the few cartridges that are accepted by a large variety of rifles and handguns.

Popularity in the United States[edit]

The .22 LR cartridge is popular among novice shooters and experts alike. Its minimal recoil and relatively low noise make it an ideal cartridge for recreational shooting, small-game hunting, and pest control. .22 LR cadet rifles are commonly used by military cadets and others for basic firearms and marksmanship training. It is used by the Boy Scouts in the United States for the rifle shooting merit badge.[5]

The low recoil of the cartridge makes it ideal for introductory firearms courses. Novice shooters can be surprised or frightened by the noise and recoil of more powerful rounds. Beginners shooting firearms beyond their comfort level frequently develop a habit of flinching in an attempt to counter anticipated recoil. The resulting habit impedes correct posture and follow-through at the most critical phase of the shot and is difficult to correct. With high recoil eliminated, other errors in marksmanship technique are easier to identify and correct.

Available for this round are AR-15 upper receivers and M1911 slide assemblies. Many handgun manufacturers have an upper pistol conversion kit to make it shoot .22 LR ammunition. These conversions allow shooters to practice inexpensively while retaining the handling characteristics of their chosen firearms (with reduced recoil and muzzle blast). Additionally, .22 LR cartridge conversion kits allow practice at indoor ranges which prohibit high-power firearms. Owners of guns that use gas systems, such as AR-15 sport style rifles, normally avoid firing non-jacketed .22 LR cartridge ammunition, as the use of unjacketed ammunition may cause lead-fouling of the gas-port inside the barrel and costly gunsmithing procedures.

A wide variety of .22 LR ammunition is available commercially, and the available ammunition varies widely both in price and performance. Bullet weights among commercially available ammunition range from 20 to 60 grains (1.3 to 3.9 g), and velocities vary from 575 to 1,750 ft/s (175 to 533 m/s). .22 LR is the least costly cartridge ammunition available.[6] Promotional loads for plinking can be purchased in bulk for significantly less cost than precision target rounds. The low cost of ammunition has a substantial effect on the popularity of the .22 LR. For this reason, rimfire cartridges are commonly used for target practice.

.22 LR cartridges are commonly packaged in boxes of 50 or 100 rounds, and is often sold by the 'brick', a carton containing either 10 boxes of 50 rounds or loose cartridges totaling 500 rounds, or the 'case' containing 10 bricks totaling 5,000 rounds. Annual production is estimated by some at 2–2.5 billion rounds.[7][8] The NSSFestimates that a large percentage of the US production of 10 billion cartridges is composed of .22 LR.[9] Despite the high production figures there have occasionally been shortages of .22 LR cartridge in the continental United States, most notably during the 2008–13 United States ammunition shortage.

Performance[edit]

Two .22 LR rounds compared to a .45 ACP cartridge

Performance depends on barrel length and the type of action. For example, it will often perform differently in a bolt-action rifle than in a semiautomatic rifle. The .22 LR is effective to 150 yd (140 m), though practical ranges tend to be less. After 150 yd, the ballistics of the round are such that it will be difficult to compensate for the large "drop". The relatively short effective range, low report, and light recoil has made it a favorite for use as a target-practice cartridge. The accuracy of the cartridge is good, but not exceptional; various cartridges are capable of the same or better accuracy. A contributing factor in rifles is the transition of even a high-velocity cartridge projectile from supersonic to subsonic within 100 yd (91 m). As the bullet slows, the shock wave caused by supersonic travel overtakes the bullet and can disrupt its flight path, causing minor but measurable inaccuracies.

When zeroed for 100 yd (91 m), the arc-trajectory of the standard high-velocity .22 LR with a 40-gr bullet has a 2.7-inch (69 mm) rise at 50 yd (46 m), and a 10.8-inch (27 cm) drop at 150 yd (140 m).[10] A .22 LR rifle needs to be zeroed for 75 yd (69 m) to avoid overshooting small animals like squirrels at intermediate distances.[10]

As a hunting cartridge, rimfires are mainly used to kill small game up to the size of coyotes.[11] Although proper shot placement can kill larger animals such as deer or hog,[12] it is not recommended because its low power may not guarantee a humane kill.[13] The largest recorded animal killed with a .22 long caliber rifle was a grizzly bear in 1953.[14]

American firearms manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company introduced the .22 Long Rifle cartridge in 1887.[4] The round owes its origin to the .22 BB Cap of 1845 and the .22 Short of 1857. It combined the casing of the .22 Long of 1871 with the 40-grain (2.6 g) bullet of the .22 Extra Long of 1880, giving it a longer overall length, a higher muzzle velocity and superior performance as a hunting and target round, rendering both the .22 Long and .22 Extra Long cartridges obsolete. The .22 LR uses a heeled bullet, which means that the bullet is the same diameter as the case, and has a narrower "heel" portion that fits in the case. It is one of the few cartridges that are accepted by a large variety of rifles and handguns.

Popularity in the United States[edit]

The .22 LR cartridge is popular among novice shooters and experts alike. Its minimal recoil and relatively low noise make it an ideal cartridge for recreational shooting, small-game hunting, and pest control. .22 LR cadet rifles are commonly used by military cadets and others for basic firearms and marksmanship training. It is used by the Boy Scouts in the United States for the rifle shooting merit badge.[5]

The low recoil of the cartridge makes it ideal for introductory firearms courses. Novice shooters can be surprised or frightened by the noise and recoil of more powerful rounds. Beginners shooting firearms beyond their comfort level frequently develop a habit of flinching in an attempt to counter anticipated recoil. The resulting habit impedes correct posture and follow-through at the most critical phase of the shot and is difficult to correct. With high recoil eliminated, other errors in marksmanship technique are easier to identify and correct.

Available for this round are AR-15 upper receivers and M1911 slide assemblies. Many handgun manufacturers have an upper pistol conversion kit to make it shoot .22 LR ammunition. These conversions allow shooters to practice inexpensively while retaining the handling characteristics of their chosen firearms (with reduced recoil and muzzle blast). Additionally, .22 LR cartridge conversion kits allow practice at indoor ranges which prohibit high-power firearms. Owners of guns that use gas systems, such as AR-15 sport style rifles, normally avoid firing non-jacketed .22 LR cartridge ammunition, as the use of unjacketed ammunition may cause lead-fouling of the gas-port inside the barrel and costly gunsmithing procedures.

A wide variety of .22 LR ammunition is available commercially, and the available ammunition varies widely both in price and performance. Bullet weights among commercially available ammunition range from 20 to 60 grains (1.3 to 3.9 g), and velocities vary from 575 to 1,750 ft/s (175 to 533 m/s). .22 LR is the least costly cartridge ammunition available.[6] Promotional loads for plinking can be purchased in bulk for significantly less cost than precision target rounds. The low cost of ammunition has a substantial effect on the popularity of the .22 LR. For this reason, rimfire cartridges are commonly used for target practice.

.22 LR cartridges are commonly packaged in boxes of 50 or 100 rounds, and is often sold by the 'brick', a carton containing either 10 boxes of 50 rounds or loose cartridges totaling 500 rounds, or the 'case' containing 10 bricks totaling 5,000 rounds. Annual production is estimated by some at 2–2.5 billion rounds.[7][8] The NSSFestimates that a large percentage of the US production of 10 billion cartridges is composed of .22 LR.[9] Despite the high production figures there have occasionally been shortages of .22 LR cartridge in the continental United States, most notably during the 2008–13 United States ammunition shortage.

Performance[edit]

Two .22 LR rounds compared to a .45 ACP cartridge

Performance depends on barrel length and the type of action. For example, it will often perform differently in a bolt-action rifle than in a semiautomatic rifle. The .22 LR is effective to 150 yd (140 m), though practical ranges tend to be less. After 150 yd, the ballistics of the round are such that it will be difficult to compensate for the large "drop". The relatively short effective range, low report, and light recoil has made it a favorite for use as a target-practice cartridge. The accuracy of the cartridge is good, but not exceptional; various cartridges are capable of the same or better accuracy. A contributing factor in rifles is the transition of even a high-velocity cartridge projectile from supersonic to subsonic within 100 yd (91 m). As the bullet slows, the shock wave caused by supersonic travel overtakes the bullet and can disrupt its flight path, causing minor but measurable inaccuracies.

When zeroed for 100 yd (91 m), the arc-trajectory of the standard high-velocity .22 LR with a 40-gr bullet has a 2.7-inch (69 mm) rise at 50 yd (46 m), and a 10.8-inch (27 cm) drop at 150 yd (140 m).[10] A .22 LR rifle needs to be zeroed for 75 yd (69 m) to avoid overshooting small animals like squirrels at intermediate distances.[10]

As a hunting cartridge, rimfires are mainly used to kill small game up to the size of coyotes.[11] Although proper shot placement can kill larger animals such as deer or hog,[12] it is not recommended because its low power may not guarantee a humane kill.[13] The largest recorded animal killed with a .22 long caliber rifle was a grizzly bear in 1953.[14]


22 Long Rifle – subsonic hollow point (left), standard velocity (center), hyper-velocity "Stinger" hollow point (right)

Type

Rimfire cartridge

Place of origin

United States

Production history

Designer

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company

Designed

1887

Specifications

Parent case

.22 Long[1]

Case type

Rimmed, straight[1]

Bullet diameter

0.223 in (5.7 mm) - 0.2255 in (5.73 mm)[1]

Neck diameter

.226 in (5.7 mm)[1]

Base diameter

.226 in (5.7 mm)[1]

Rim diameter

.278 in (7.1 mm)[1]

Rim thickness

.043 in (1.1 mm)[1]

Case length

.613 in (15.6 mm)[1]

Overall length

1.000 in (25.4 mm)[1]

Rifling twist

1:16"[1]

Primer type

Rimfire[1]

Ballistic performance




Bullet mass/type

Velocity

Energy


40 gr. (2.6 g) Solid[2]

1,200 ft/s (370 m/s)

131 ft⋅lbf (178 J)

38 gr. (2.5 g) Copper-plated HP[2]

1,260 ft/s (380 m/s)

134 ft⋅lbf (182 J)

32 gr. (2.1 g) Copper-plated HP[2]

1,430 ft/s (440 m/s)

141 ft⋅lbf (191 J)

31 gr. (2.0 g) Copper-plated RN[3]

1,750 ft/s (530 m/s)

204 ft⋅lbf (277 J)

30 gr. (1.9 g) Copper-plated HP

[3]

1,640 ft/s (500 m/s)

191 ft⋅lbf (259 J)


Test barrel length: 18.5"

Source(s): [2][3]




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.22_Long_Rifle




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