Reloading Podcast 230 - Tirdy Tirdy

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  Tonight the guys are talkin tirty tirdy and some casting.

  1. Chris M. asked: “Mr Fleming, I have a 30-30 question perhaps you could bring up for discussion (if it’s not too much trouble) during a podcast. The question; 30-30 Winchester for a lever action uses a  308 bullet. Could a hand loader use any .308 bullet in that round? For example, I load 168gr ELD’s from Hornady in my .308 loads. Would I be able to use that in a 30-30? Or is it best to just stick with recommended bullet weights for said caliber? I’d love to hear all of your thoughts on this one.”

  2. Brandon posted in CB&BC: So now that hunting season has started or about to start for most, what is everyone’s hunting bullet of choice? My choice this year is the lee 310 gr fn 44 mag at about 10 bhn and moving at about 1,100fps (7.5” barrel) and 1500 fps (20” barrel)Shot from a Ruger Blackhawk hunter and Rossi 92.

  3. Jim posted in CB & BC: I just started researching... Are there any recommendations for resources to cast bullets with something other than lead? I don't mind reading and putting the work in, just wanted to see if there was a recommendation for research. TIA





Cartridge Corner Notes:.30-30 Winchester

The .30-30 Winchester/.30 Winchester Centerfire (7.62×51 mmR) cartridge was first marketed in early 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever-action rifle. The .30-30 (thirty-thirty), as it is most commonly known, was the USA's first small-bore, sporting rifle cartridge designed for smokeless powder.

Characteristics and use

When originally produced by Winchester Repeating Arms (WRA) and Union Metallic Cartridge Company (UMC), it was manufactured with a "metal patched" (jacketed) lead bullet weighing 160 gr. One year later, UMC produced a 170-grain bullet offering, which is still the most popular loading for the cartridge. Both 150- and 170-grain bullets continue to be very popular, as seen in the number of these weights offered by current manufacturers. Although, the 160-grain bullet weight has reappeared in modern cartridges from Hornady, as noted below. Jacketed bullets for the .30-30 are .308 inches in nominal diameter. Cast lead bullets for the .30-30 are also popular and usually are .309 inches in diameter.

The .30-30 is considered to be the "entry-class" for modern big-game hunting cartridges, and it is common to define the characteristics of cartridges with similar ballistics as being in ".30-30 class" when describing their trajectory. While it is very effective on deer-sized and black bear-sized game, most commercial loadings are limited in effective range to about 200 yd (183 m) for that purpose, except when using ballistic-tip ammunition. The cartridge is typically loaded with bullets weighing between 150 and 170 grains (9.7–11.0 g), but lighter loads are possible. Bullets of up to 180 gr (11.7 g) can be used, but the overall length restrictions of the lever-action rifles most commonly chambered for this round limit their usefulness.

In Canada and the U.S., the cartridge has also been used on moose, caribou, and pronghorn. Modern opinions in Canada on its suitability for moose are mixed. Paul Robertson, a Canadian hunting firearms columnist, says, "Too many moose have been taken with the [.30-30] to rule it out as good for this purpose, as well." In both Canada and the U.S. it has a long history of use on moose. It is generally agreed that the .30-30 is not a good choice for hunters who wish to shoot animals at longer ranges. The cartridge, with flat- or round-nosed bullets, does not meet minimum energy standards required for moose hunting in Finland, Norway, or Sweden. Hunting technique and style, as well as law and culture, dictate cartridge choices. Thor Strimbold, a Canadian who has made more than 20 one-shot kills on moose with a .30-30, advises most moose hunters to use more than minimal power if they can handle the recoil. While the .30-30 is legal for hunting moose in Newfoundland, Canada, game authorities do not recommend its use.

One of the primary reasons for the .30-30's popularity amongst deer hunters is its light recoil. Average recoil from a typical 150-grain load at 2,390 feet per second (730 m/s) in a 7.5 lb (3.4 kg) rifle is 10.6 foot-pounds (14.4 J) of felt recoil at the shooter's shoulder, about half that of a comparable rifle chambered for the .30-06 Springfield.


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