ARP 096 - AR Vehicle Storage Options

ARP-096-Storage-300x200.jpg

Welcome to Episode #096 of the AR15 Podcast. I’m your host J.W. Ramp and with me today is Anthony Hardy.  This is the podcast about your favorite black rifle!  This show is for you; whether you're building your first AR or you’ve been building ARs for years. There is something we can all do to take our black rifle to the next level.  

Brownells helps make this show possible.

Don’t forget that Brownells, with their 100% lifetime satisfaction guarantee, is there for you anytime you have a problem, like when you can’t remove the taper pins from your new barrel to slip off the front sight base and you now have to find a new barrel.

Shop for AR-15 parts at Brownells.  Go to: ar15podcast.com/parts

Product of the Week:

CMMG - AR-15 .22 LR CONVERSION KITS

Brownell’s Back in Black Rifle Event

Main Topic:  Vehicle Storage Options

          Considerations

  • Legality (loaded guns, SBRs)
  • Security
  • Concealment (tinting, etc)
  • Insurance (Home vs Auto, read YOUR policies)

          Interior

Exterior

Feedback:

Brian M:        (EP 93) Thanks, really enjoyed this episode. (EP 94) Good timing on this episode.  It was nice to hear how realistic i should be in terms of the  economics of reloading.

Andrew: Hey guys, great shows.  Suggestion; how about a show on AR belt-fed's like Ares Defense MCR-16.  See recent Recoil magazine featuring the Ares Defense upper.

Jon: I want to thank you for taking the initiative to educate and inform. I think the best episode is #092 covering SBR's and AR pistols. I have an Adams Arms 7.5" upper on a billet lower I built so this episode really hit home when the legalities of owning a short barrel were covered.  I have a couple of show suggestions:

MSR Training - qcb, vehicle, home invasion etc. having a plan and using some range time for training to stress situations could save lives. Obviously shooting competitions are a good way to train but I would suggest covering specific live fire drills that make better shooters.

Reliability - there are a ton of doityourself AR fans and people who just bought a run of the mill production AR that have run into reliability issues. The proper way to begin diagnosing different reliability issues. There are several easily identified classifications of weapon failure. Short stroke or failure to feed and failure to eject as well as more dangerous double feeds and squibs. How to identify, diagnose and fix these issues are different depending on the type of operating system but also very similar in that gas issues are very common.

I would like to share some of the details of my AR pistol build.  I had some short stroking issues from the start. I took my upper to several local FFL's and was told to run heavier projectiles, use a comp, change my buffer and buffer spring etc. One person told me "whatever you do don't send it back to AA." Once I heard that I had to send it back in. They have good customer service and paid insured shipping both ways.  I got my upper back and it ran the 55 grain 556 winchester but would only feed 2-3 of the 55 grain federal .223.  I bought a Noveske KX3 and still had the same outcome, .223 was causing a short stroke. So I asked AA to take another look. In all fairness they asked me to ship my lower out this time so they could work with the complete firearm.  I reluctantly sent both my lower and upper in to AA.  It came back to me in less time than before, which made me really happy. The first time it was out for about 3 weeks this time it was less than 2 weeks from the time I sent it to the time it came back. I added the Magpul MS4 (which is excellent for applying forward pressure to stabilize), ALG combat trigger and an Eotech XPS2-0 (which adds substantial weight btw).  The next time to the range and it was feeding everything flawlessly.  Thanks to AA for a great product that they stand behind and thanks to the AR15 podcast for all the fun listening material and info.  I think I may go with a .300 AAC Blackout next.  Build on!

Chris: After listening to the recent podcast I ran across this

http://www.forgottenweapons.com/suomi-m31-and-underbarrel-flamethrower/

While not a production item, it does show that you can have a Flame thrower mounted under a carbine, so it should be even easier in today's world to accomplish this.

Myles: Hey, I just had to write in concerning your latest episode.

Are flame throwers legal in this country. Well, kind of. Believe it or not they are very hard to regulate because not only is it shockingly easy to build one. But there are several civilian uses for them. No I am not going to tell you how to build one. If you want to be chased down a hallway by a fireball you have to do all that work yourself.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flamethrower#Private_ownership

I know it's a Wikipedia link but it's the best I could do on short notice.

But with that being said flamethrowers are an awful weapon for a wide variety of reasons. They are heavy, dangerous to the user and a decidedly short range proposition. In reality or fiction I have only ever heard of one instance of a flamethrower being mounted to a gun. In the movie Spawn I seem to recall an under barrel launcher of some kind of flammable slime. But that wasn't technically a flamethrower. It just sprayed around goop that you could light on fire.

I think one would be much better served with some manner of incendiary device like a flare launcher if you want a fire-starter mounted on your gun.

Also, the Zip 22 contraption you talked about. Some acquaintances of mine have had experience with those. They are useless and somewhat dangerous to the user in a stand alone configuration. At least the early ones were. Perhaps it could have been useful as an integrally suppressed addition to a long gun. But with laws in this country being what they are you would probably be better off with say a suppressed Ruger 22 pistol.

Ps, I forgot to mention the last time I wrote. Another issue with the Ruger 556E. The one I had, had loctite on the muzzle device. So I needed to take it to a gunsmith who used a heat gun to get it off. Hmm, another use for a flamethrower perhaps?

Ian:  You guys continue to do a great job! I can’t believe you only received one piece of listener feedback last week, not cool man, lets pick it up people!

A couple of observations/ questions:

I really enjoyed the SHTF episode, although some might say Peter has a tendency to take over the conversation, he’s a great guest to have on, and always livens things up. What’s his background, and is he on other shows on the network?  Reminded me a little bit of the Optics episodes (still my all time favorite), a bit of a free-for-all with everyone talking over each other.  Maybe you should include more Bourbon in the future!

I’d like to hear what JW’s opinion is on this considering it seems all he does is train, spend time on private ranges and shoot houses, and admire his growing stamp collection!  Must be nice.  JW what is the most common manual of arms taught for clearing a jam/ changing mags when you need to lock the bolt back.

It always makes me nuts to have to take the rifle off target, my strong hand off the grip in order to lock the bolt carrier to the rear. never seemed very well thought out.

So with that in mind have you noticed all the new lowers/ rifles coming out lately that feature the ambi bolt catch/ release. For me one of the most useful features to have and a long time coming.

For right handed shooters the bolt catch can be engaged and released with the right index finger, leaving the left hand to work the bolt and change mags.

JW, you rock, and Reed thanks again.

Oh, and the rock guitar outro is always awesome.

Outro: